Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

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Wuthering Heights, written by Emily Bronte, has 323 pages. The genre of Wuthering Heights is realistic fiction, and it is a romantic novel. The book is available in the school library, but it was bought at Barnes and Nobles. The author’s purpose of writing Wuthering Heights is to describe a twisted and dark romance story. Thus, the author conveys the theme of one of life’s absolute truths: love is pain. In addition, the mood of the book is melancholy and tumultuous. Lastly, the single most important incident of the book is when Heathcliff arrives to Edgar Linton’s residence in the Granges unannounced to see Catherine’s state of health. Heathcliff’s single visit overwhelmed Catherine to the point of death.
(2) Emily Bronte’s purpose in writing Wuthering Heights is to depict unfulfilled love in a tragic romance novel and hence the theme of Wuthering Heights is love is pain. Emily Bronte reveals an important life lesson that love is not sufficient for happiness and if anything, stirs up more agony. This message is important because, although it is difficult to accept, the message is devastatingly honest. In Wuthering Heights, two characters named Heathcliff and Catherine loved each other immensely. However, their pride and adamance disabled them from making any progress on their romantic relationship. In fact, Heathcliff and Catherine purposely hurt each another through reckless and cruel actions. The author is exemplifying a recurring theme in history that love is associated with pain. The message allows readers to be aware that love is not constant perfection and happiness.
(4) Wuthering Heights’s mood is melancholy and tumultuous. As a result, the book gives off a feeling of sorrow and chaos. For example, Catherine’s marriage with Edgar Linton made Heathcliff jealous and angry. In retaliation, Heathcliff married Edgar’s sister, Isabella, to provoke Catherine and Edgar. Heathcliff and Isabella’s marriage ignited a chaotic uproar with Edgar and Catherine because Linton disapproved of Heathcliff’s character, and Catherine loved Heathcliff in spite of being married to Edgar. Inside, Catherine wanted to selfishly keep Heathcliff to herself. Their relationships all had tragic endings because Catherine died giving birth to Edgar’s child. Isabella also died, leaving behind her young son. Heathcliff and Edgar resented each other because of misery they experienced together. The transition of the mood in the story is from chaotic to somber.

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The characters first entered a clamorous and confusing atmosphere when Heathcliff married Isabella. However, somberness started to emerge in the story because of Catherine’s death.
(3) The most important part in the story is when Heathcliff visits Catherine unannounced to check on the state of her health. Because of Heathcliff’s unexpected intrusion in the Linton house, Catherine became overwhelmed with feelings; she felt a mixture of rancor, remorse, and above all, joy. She was rancorous and remorseful about never properly handling her feelings for Heathcliff. Catherine merely provoked Heathcliff so that he could show how much he cared about her. On the other hand, she was overjoyed that Heathcliff, her soulmate, came to see her after being deprived of him for a long period of time due to her husband. Because Catherine felt so many emotions, her body was incapable of handling it therefore she died. Catherine’s death greatly affected Edgar and Heathcliff; Edgar hated Heathcliff with a passion for being the cause of his beloved wife’s death, and Heathcliff’s spirit was entirely eradicated from losing the one person he loved most.
Wuthering Heights is a unique and passionate novel. It has great character development along with an amazing plot. The haunting tale written by Emily Bronte is one of the few novels that ruggedly depicts love in such a twisted and odd style. This book was chosen because it is reputable of being one of the greatest novels of all time. Readers who are interested in dark romance stories would definitely be interested in reading Wuthering Heights. Wuthering Heights is highly recommended for other readers in the class because the plot is intriguing and refreshingly different. It is a nice change from the cliché stories about heroes rescuing their damsels. Wuthering Heights is written in a raw and honest style.


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