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Essay about The War on Drugs: Drug Sentencing Reform

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Drug Sentencing Reform
The Judiciary Branch of the United States government is responsible for interpreting the law. Those involved with this branch determine the meaning of the laws and decide what to do with those who break them. Because of a drug movement that took place through the 1980s, the courts have severely punished those who break laws associated to drugs; Congress is now trying to step in to change the way the Judiciary Branch is forced to punish such criminals. Congress has been busy the past couple of years evaluating the proper sentencing of those convicted of drug crimes. Many men and women of Congress are joining forces in an attempt to come up with a solution to propose as an amendment. Our elected leaders believe the need for the reform of drug crimes is due because of the number of cases and number of years those convicted are spending in prisons. Because of the drug wars that took place in the United States, the minimum sentence has been set so high today. Drug reform is needed in the United States, and those convicted of drug crimes with improper sentences need to have their sentence reduced. 1
The war on drugs began with the presidential term of President Nixon in the 1970s. According to drugpolicy.org, “He dramatically increased the size and presence of federal drug control agencies, and pushed through measures such as mandatory sentencing and no-knock warrants. Nixon temporarily placed marijuana in Schedule One, the most restrictive category of drugs.” While Nixon made it a major crime to possess and distribute drugs, including marijuana, several states went against his belief and decriminalized the use of marijuana. However, presidents weren’t done with their say in the use of drugs. President Ronald Re...


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... long. As it turned out, to her surprise, she was sentenced to 30 years in prison. A young lady with no criminal background was sentenced to three decades behind bars. But after the recent change in nonviolent drug charges, she had her sentence cut to 21 years, and she was released from prison. She has now returned home to her adult children. Nodd stated, “I didn’t need 20 years to learn my lesson. It would have taken me a month behind bars because it killed me to leave my kids.” Because of the old structured minimums that are set before our judges and juries, people like Nodd have to suffer unjust consequences.



Works Cited

http://www.progressive.org/mag_abramsky0606
http://www.drugpolicy.org/new-solutions-drug-policy/brief-history-drug-war
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jag-davies/drug-war-pew-poll_b_5077423.html
http://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp/drugpolicyreform



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