Preview
Preview

Virginia Woolf and Contemporary Feminism Essay

:: 2 Works Cited
Length: 916 words (2.6 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Virginia Woolf (1882 – 1941), a prominent English writer and feminist, was considered one of the twentieth-century’s most remarkable modernist novelists. The well-known works of Virginia Woolf are often closely related to the development of feminist reproach. With that being said, she was a rather distinguished writer in relation to the modernist movement as well. Virginia Woolf certainly restructured the novel, experimenting with her flow of thoughts and imageries. Although, not always appearing to be the work of clear organization or even solid structure for that matter. This allowed her to portray the inner lives (emotional and psychological motives) of her characters through an element of familiarity.
During the course of her life, Virginia Woolf endured severe fits of mental illness, believed to have been the effect of what is typically characterized as bipolar disorder. While her fairly unique style of writing was largely influenced by way of the symptoms she experienced though her disorder, those same symptoms likewise triggered horrible mood swings. This behavior repeatedly led to periods of recuperation in her home which caused her imagination and ingenuity to be compromised in relation to her writing.
Throughout her lifetime, Virginia Woolf wrote nine novels: The Voyage Out, Orlando, To the Lighthouse, Mrs. Dalloway, Jacob’s Room, Night and Day, The Years, The Waves and Between the Acts. In addition to novels, she wrote many pieces of non-fiction as well: The Death of the Moth and Other Essays, Women and Writing and A Room of One's Own.
With that being said, A Room of One's Own (1929), a book-length essay, is regarded by most as one of Virginia Woolf’s most famous pieces (in terms of criticism and feminist literary). ...


... middle of paper ...


...e literary world in relation to its conventions concerning women writers, her feminism, which consist not just of her obvious feminist politics but her captivation and concern with gender characteristics, molded her writing greatly. This, in turn, contributed greatly to the contemporary feminism of her time as she took personal experiences in life and used them as an inspiration throughout her writing. With that being said, perhaps her single most important work of feminist literary criticism, A Room of One's Own contributed most as it explores the circumstantial and historic possibilities and personal experiences of Virginia Woolf concerning contemporary feminism and literary achievement.



Works Cited

Woolf, Virginia. A Room of One’s Own. eBooks@Adelaide. 4 Mar. 2014. Web. 7 Apr. 2014.
Woolf, Virginia. “Virginia Wolf.” The Literature Network. 7 April 2014. Web.



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay on Orland by Janet Woolf - The effect marriage in Virginia Woolf’s Orlando has upon the modern individual will be the focus of this essay, whilst also considering the role the wedding ring plays in defining the terms of marriage. Woolf portrays Orlando as a modern individual largely because she is free from a number of social conventions and familial pressures other women of the time are subjected to. Despite this, it is the pressure of marriage that she cannot escape: even after she has married Shelmerdine, Orlando is thinking of ways to live her life as before....   [tags: feminism, marriage]
:: 5 Works Cited
1661 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Life and Work of Virginia Woolf Essays - From the early death of her mother at age 13 to the sexual abuse from her own half brothers led to the many mental and emotional breakdowns that made Virginia Woolf, “one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century…” (“Virginia Woolf” n.page.). Woolf’s, “Kew Gardens”, is a classic short story written in 1919 that shows the importance of women’s rights and illustrates that even when you are surrounded by people you still can feel empty and alone. This significant story reflects Virginia’s life filled with depression even though she was a great success and had a happy marriage....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, ]
:: 1 Works Cited
1357 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Brief Overview of Feminism Essay example - A Brief Overview of Feminism Feminism can be roughly described as a movement that seeks to enhance the quality of women’s lives by impacting the norms and moves of a society based on male dominance and subsequent female subordination. Although feminist literary writings began to gain popularity in the 20th century, feminist characters have been around for ages. “Feminist criticism’s self transformations over the past several decades as it engages with both critiques from within and encounters from without- encounters with psychoanalysis, Marxism, Post-Structuralisms, ethnic studies, post-colonial theory, and lesbian and gay studies- have produced a complex proliferation of work no...   [tags: essays papers] 565 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay about The Death of the Moth, by Virginia Woolf - The battle against death, while can be portrayed as magnificent, is ultimately pathetic and insignificant. Like a boulder tipping precariously off a cliff, one can exhibit the ardent desire to survive, yet against the fragility and impermanence of life, this desire is a pitiful effort in the face of impending failure. The hopelessness of such a situation is depicted in “The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf, in which the moth incessantly endeavors to overcome the irresolvable dilemma of breaking through the barriers that contain it and visit the outside world....   [tags: The Death of the Moth, Virginia Woolf] 725 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Duchess And The Jeweler by Virginia Woolf Essay - The Duchess and the Jeweler is the story of the world's greatest jeweler who had promised his mother to become the richest jeweler in the world in his childhood but now that his dream has materialized he does not feel satisfied. So trying to achieve satisfaction, knowingly he buys fake pearls from a Duchess in exchange for passing a whole weekend with her daughter whom he is in love with. The purpose of this essay is to show how Virginia Woolf has successfully presented the inner mind of the characters, their struggle and their communication through the least amount of verbal communication among them....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Duchess Jeweler] 1572 words
(4.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf - To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf When speaking of modernism in the work Virginia Woolf, scholars too readily use her innovations in style and technique as the starting point for critical analysis, focusing largely on the ways in which her prose represents a departure from the conventional novel in both style and content. To simply discuss the extent of her unique style, however, is to overlook the role of tradition in her creation of a new literary identity. In To the Lighthouse, Woolf's invention reveals itself instead as a reinvention, a recasting of the conventional through the use of the traditional....   [tags: Lighthouse Virginia Woolf Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
2170 words
(6.2 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Viriginia Woolf Essay - Viriginia Woolf (this essay has problems with the format) One of the greatest female authors of all time, Virginia Woolf, produced a body of writing respected worldwide. Driven by uncontrollable circumstances and internal conflict, her life was cut short by suicide. Her role in feminism, along with the personal relationships in her life, influenced her literary works. Virginia's relationships throughout her life contributed, not only to her literature, but the quality of her life as well. Perhaps the greatest influence in Virginia's life is her mother, Julia Stephen....   [tags: Author Viriginia Woolf feminism relationships]
:: 4 Works Cited
1952 words
(5.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Virginia Woolf's Orlando and the Relationship between Virginia and Vita - Virginia Woolf's Orlando and the Relationship between Virginia and Vita It has been said the novel Orlando is the longest love-letter ever written; a celebration of the bond between women. The relationship between Virginia Woolf and Vita Sackville-West is well documented and known to have been intimate. That Virginia was passionate and giddy about her relationship with Vita is also known and displayed in Orlando. But Orlando also offers a rare intimate glimpse into the mind of Virginia Woolf. An unselfconscious work, it reveals her mind, talent at play....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
2738 words
(7.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Virginia Woolf - Moving Beyond a Convoluted Memory of Her Parents Essay - Virginia Woolf - Moving Beyond a Convoluted Memory of Her Parents Why would I start with Julia Duckworth Stephen to get to Virginia Woolf. One answer is Virginia’s often quoted statement that "we think back through our mothers if we are women" (Woolf, A Room of One’s Own). Feminism is rooted not just in a response to patriarchy but also in the history of females and their treatment of each other. Part of feminism is a reevaluation of the value of motherhood. But what does Virginia’s mother have to do with Virginia’s writing....   [tags: Virginia Woolf]
:: 9 Works Cited
2260 words
(6.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Essay - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway It is apparent throughout the Virgina Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway that the character development and complexity of the female characters of the story are concentrated on far more than their male counterparts. It is my feelings that the magnitude of this character development comes about because of the observations and feelings of the main character Mrs....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Dalloway] 1125 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]