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Essay about Violence and Monarchy in The Literary Works of Oresteia

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Violence and Monarchy in The Literary Works of Oresteia


In the ancient myths from the Aegean seas, much political theory is derived. Lessons on the dangers associated with monarchical political forms are brought to light. The connection between gender and power along with violence, war and necessity raise questions to enact a democracy and depersonalize the government.

In the literary works of the Oresteia there is a relationship built between the perpetuated cycle of violence and monarchy. The cycle of vengeance began with the slaughter of Thyestes children and continued throughout the generations of hierarchy. The wisdom of the gods has instilled the right to vengeance after wrong doing as read in the Libation Bearers. “Almighty Destinies, by the will of Zeus let these things be done, in the turning of Justice. For the word of hatred spoken, let hate be a word fulfilled. The spirit of Right cries out aloud and extracts atonement due: blood stroke for the stroke of blood shall be paid. Who acts, shall endure. So speaks the voice of age-old wisdom.”(lines 306-314). The sla...


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