The Bedroom inThe Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

  • Length: 451 words (1.3 double-spaced pages)
  • Rating: Excellent
Open Document

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Text Preview

More ↓

Continue reading...

Open Document

The Yellow Wallpaper - The Bedroom

As the story progresses in, The Yellow Wallpaper, it is as if the space of the bedroom turns in on itself, folding in on the body as the walls take hold of it, epitomizing the narrator's growing intimacy with control. Because the narrator experiences the bedroom in terms of John's draconian organization, she relies on her prior experiences of home in an attempt to allay the alienation and isolation the bedroom creates. Recalling her childhood bedroom, she writes, "I remember what a kindly wink the knobs of our big, old bureau used to have, and there was one chair that always seemed like a strong friend . . . I could always hop into that chair and feel safe" (Gilman 17). Ironically, Gilman's narrator cannot retire to the otherwise "personal haven" of the bedroom because she is always already there, enclosed within the attic room of John's desires, bereft of her own voice and personal history. The narrator's imagination is altogether problematic for John, who would prohibit his wife from further fancifulness: "[John] says that with my imaginative power and habit of story-making, a nervous weakness like mine is sure to lead to all manner of excited fancies, and that I ought to use my will and good sense to check the tendency. So I try" (Gilman 15-16). For Gaston Bachelard, who devotes himself to a phenomenological exploration of the home in The Poetics of Space, "imaginative power" is the nucleus of the home, if not the home itself. Memories of prior dwellings are for Bachelard a fundamental aspect of creating new homes based on a continuity with the past and past spaces. "[B]y approaching the house images with care not to break up the solidarity of memory and imagination," writes Bachelard, "we may hope to make others feel all the psychological elasticity of an image that moves us at an unimaginable depth" (6). Bachelard's "elasticity" infers that spatial depth and expansion are contingent upon a psychological flexibility of imagination. Gilman's narrator is notably denied this elasticity when her physician/husband attempts to prevent her from writing. "I did write for a while in spite of them," the narrator explains, "but it does exhaust me a good deal--having to be so sly about it, or else meet with heavy opposition" (Gilman 10).

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"The Bedroom inThe Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman." 20 Mar 2018
Title Length Color Rating  
Hysteria's Affects in ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’ by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - During our time in class, we have had the opportunity to study ‘The Yellow Wallpaper’, a short novel written by Charlotte Perkins Gilman; A popular feminist during the Victorian era. The story was first published in the 1892 issue of ‘The New England Magazine’. Gilman was born July 3rd 1860 and died August 17th 1935. She married Charles Walter Stetson in 1884. Her postnatal depression led up to her divorce in 1888. As it was for nearly all women in the Victorian era, Gilman was told she was suffering from hysteria....   [tags: Yellow Wallpaper, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, ] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Removing Wallpaper Reveals Wall in “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - The story “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman is about a female narrator who is suffering from some form of post partum depression that spirals out of control as her husband tries to help by secluding her, in the middle of nowhere for three months. Since the woman is already admittedly unsound, the seclusion makes her fixate severely on yellow wallpaper in her bedroom. Eventually as her story progresses, her fixation becomes an obsession and the wallpaper begins to do things completely improbable....   [tags: Yellow Wallpaper, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, ] 809 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Themes, Symbols, and Feelings in "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - In "The Yellow Wallpaper," by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, the protagonist symbolizes the effect of the oppression of women in society in the Nineteenth Century. In The Yellow Wallpaper, the author reveals the narrator is torn between hate and love, but emotion is difficult to determine. The effects are produced by the use of complex themes used in the story, which assisted her oppression and reflected on her self-expression. The yellow wallpaper is a symbol of oppression in a woman who felt her duties were limited as a wife and mother....   [tags: The Yellow Wallpaper, Charlotte Perkins Gilman]
:: 7 Works Cited
754 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Gilman - Analysis of The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Gilman The "Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Gilman is a great story about the repression of women in the late 1800's but is still representative of issues faced by women today. She writes from her own personal experiences and conveys a message that sometimes in a male dominated society women suffer from the relentless power that some men implement over women. The narrator is suffering from a mild depression that her physician husband has prescribed complete bed rest in order for her to recover....   [tags: The Yellow Wallpaper, Charlotte Gilman] 301 words
(0.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman Charlotte Perkins Gilman's, "The Yellow Wallpaper" is a partial autobiography. It was written shortly after the author suffered a nervous breakdown. This story was written to help save people from being driven crazy. Appropriately, this short story is about a mentally disturbed woman and her husband's attempts to help her get well. He does so by convincing her that solitude and constant bed rest is the best way to cure her problem....   [tags: Charlotte Perkins Gilman The Yellow Wallpaper] 1488 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman Many intellectual artists, who are widely acclaimed for their literary work, live in a world characterized by “progressive insanity” (Gilman 20). Charlotte Perkins Gilman was one such individual. A writer during the early 20th century, Gilman suffered from bouts of deep depression, due part to her dissatisfaction with the limitations of her role as wife and mother. Her writing, particularly her famous story “The Yellow Wallpaper” reflects experiences from her personal life....   [tags: Yellow Wallpaper Charlotte Perkins Gilman Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
2336 words
(6.7 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Response to The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - Response to "The Yellow Wallpaper" The woman behind this work of literature portrays the role of women in the society during that period of time. "The Yellow Wallpaper" written by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, is a well written story describing a woman who suffers from insanity and how she struggles to express her own thoughts and feelings. The author uses her own experience to criticize male domination of women during the nineteenth century. Although the story was written fifty years ago, "The Yellow Wallpaper" still brings a clear message how powerless women were during that time....   [tags: Charlotte Perkins Gilman The Yellow Wallpaper] 809 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Social Criticism in The Yellow-Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - Social Criticism in The Yellow-Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman Traditionally, men have held the power in society. Women have been treated as a second class of citizens with neither the legal rights nor the respect of their male counterparts. Culture has contributed to these gender roles by conditioning women to accept their subordinate status while encouraging young men to lead and control. Feminist criticism contends that literature either supports society’s patriarchal structure or provides social criticism in order to change this hierarchy....   [tags: The Yellow Wallpaper Charlotte Perkins Gilman] 1252 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Critical Analysis of The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman - A Critical Analysis of The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman 'The Yellow Wallpaper' written by Charlotte Perkins Gilman is a riveting story of a dejected woman locked away as if she were insane. Her passion is to write and by doing so we are able to follow her on a journey in which she is victimized by those closest to her. The significance of the story is tremendous as it delves into the underlying issues of 'a woman's place' and feminism in the 19th century. The story not only gave an insight into the public perception of mental illness but it later caused a famous psychiatrist, Silas Weir Mitchell to alter his treatment of neurasthema....   [tags: Yellow Wallpaper Wall Paper Charlotte Gilman] 1225 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Jane's Psychological Problems in Charlotte Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper - Jane's Psychological Problems in Charlotte Gilman’s "The Yellow Wallpaper" In Charlotte Gilman’s short story "The Yellow Wallpaper," Jane, the main character, is a good example of Sigmund Freud’s Studies In Hysteria. Jane suffers from symptoms such as story making and daydreaming. Jane has a nervous weakness throughout the story. Jane is a victim of a nervous disorder of the brain called hysteria. She is aware that she suffers from a series of mental and physical disturbances. She says that she has a " temporary nervous depression: -- a slight hysterical tendency- what is one to do?"(2)....   [tags: Charlotte Gilman Yellow Wallpaper Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1319 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]

Related Searches

Bachelard maintains that it is through literature, "through poems, perhaps even more than through recollections" that we "touch the ultimate poetic depth of the space of the house" (6). By forbidding her to write ("[H]e hates to have me write a word," writes the narrator, before putting away her journal) John endeavors to deny the narrator her voice, as well as her psychological experience of physical space(Gilman 13).

Return to