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The Transformation of Aunt Alexandra in To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

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People are always influenced by family members. Sometimes this influence is positive and sometimes it is negative, yet no matter what, it will change a person’s life. Change can be caused by that person fitting into the ways of a household, or be forced to act differently in the presence of others. Either way, that person will never be the same again. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, characters are constantly being influenced by family members. Aunt Alexandra, started off as a rude and bossy woman, but as she became closer to Atticus, Jem, and Scout, she changed into a more loving and compassionate person. In To Kill a Mockingbird, Aunt Alexandra is influenced by the Finches during her stay at their home.
When Aunt Alexandra first arrived at the Finch house, she took over as if she had been living there her whole life. When arriving home, Jem and Scout found her, “sitting in a rocking chair exactly as if she had sat there every day of her life.”(p. 168). From the very beginning, Aunt Alexandra felt she should be completely in charge. The first thing she said was, “‘Put my bag in the front bedroom, Calpurnia,’” (p. 169). Aunt Alexandra treated Calpurnia as if Calpurnia was her servant. Aunt Alexandra was a strong influence within the Finches home, from the beginning. It did not do much of anything in the end, yet Jem and Scout saw a different side of their father, Atticus. “Atticus suddenly grew serious. In his lawyer’s voice, without a shade of affection, he said: ‘Your aunt has asked me to try and impress upon [Jem] and Jean Louise that you are not from run-of-the-mill people, that you are the product of several generations’ gentle breeding−’”(p. 177). This may have been one of the first times that the children...


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...and stayed with Jem when no one else was there.
In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, the Finches strongly influenced Aunt Alexandra when she visited their home. By the end of the book, Aunt Alexandra was almost a completely different person because of her stay at the Finches. The whole reason for her visit was to change Scout, but instead she got changed herself. This was not what was meant to happen, but it did. This sort of thing happens in many families, as well. A family member come to change someone else, but ends up get changed instead. The ironic part of this is that when it happen, the family member who is changed, usually get positively influenced. In more cases than not, positive influence comes to people who strived to change the personality of others.



Works Cited

Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York, New York: Grand Central, 1982.


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