Themes of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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There are many themes in the story Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Some of them are abandonment, neglect, revenge, and scientific knowledge, which are all related to each other in this novel.
Throughout the story you discover that a man named Victor Frankenstein wants to create a human life. He does not think through the repercussions of his desire only that he wants the power to create. After Frankenstein creates his creature, he is so frightened and disgusted by the creature?s appearance that he abandons it. In conclusion, Frankenstein abandons his creature because of its appearance.
To the creature, Frankenstein is his father and when he left him, he felt neglected and abandoned. The creature did not know how to take care of himself and was given no direction or leadership. He left not knowing where he would go or how he would survive. Frankenstein abandoned his creature as if it were an animal. When Frankenstein abandoned his creature, he didn't even think how the creature felt, he just deserted him. In other words, the creatures abandonment was neglect to its best interest.
The creature?s hatred grew from neglect and abandonment. Every person he came in contacted with immediately shunned him. Nobody could look past his horrifying appearance to see what was inside. His hatred then turned into revenge against his creator. The creature wanted Frankenstein to feel what he felt. This is where the revenge takes place and the creature killed everyone Frankenstein loved. The way people treated the creature just by his outwardly appearance is the way society in general views and treats people even today. Society is unjust and cruel at times to people who are less pretty, less thin, less attractive in general. The creature felt this every day of his life and lost the love of his creator and never found a suitable life partner all due to society shunning the less outwardly beautiful. Basically, the treatment from not only Frankenstein but also society led the creature to seek revenge on the one who created him.
Knowledge can be both good and bad. Frankenstein felt that the study of science was greater than another other subject because you can go further than the scientist before you had gone. What Frankenstein failed to understand is just because one becomes knowledgeable in science and has the ability to create something or do something new does not mean it is morally right to proceed with the knowledge.

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In this case, Victor Frankenstein had the ability to create a human being scientifically but truly did not have the right to do so morally. I believe this is why Frankenstein?s creation ended so terribly. Science can be both wonderful and dangerous and the scientist must learn to know the difference and act accordingly. In Conclusion, scientific knowledge of a thing does not give right to create it even if able to.
In this novel by Marry Shelley there are many themes. A few examples are abandonment, neglect, revenge, and scientific knowledge. All themes are connected to one another in this novel. The knowledge bring the creation, which he abandons. This abandonment is neglect to the creatures best interest, which leads to the creatures want of revenge against his creator.


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