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The Place of Stunted Ironwood Trees Essay

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Second Simple Quiz
In the book, The Place of Stunted Ironwood Trees, by Dr. David P. Crandall, the Himba's world structure is manifested through detailed information of their ideals and their social world, where the reader can truly see their lives. These ideals and cultural background that the Himba have explain and define their families and marriages, structure of government and politics, religion and spiritual life, and their place in the social structure. Himba just like any societies have expectations and social norms that they are used to. The author uses individuals and their actions to describe the collective imaginary world that the Himba live and are accustomed to. The ideals and beliefs of the Himba, relating to their collective world, is based on their god Mukuru, their ancestors, and Omiti, which is the center and the basis of governing and maintaining the Himba society. The imaginary world of the collective Himba applies to the people of Himba and their individuals' perception, actions, and interpretations. They are however all different perceptions of their world and how they deviate from the social norm. The same ideas of different perception and deviance can be seen in the student of BYU away from the imaginary world of our society in the United States.
The imaginary world of the collective Himba can be described and defined by their deity, Mukuru, and his interaction and guidance of the Himba people. They believe that Mukruru is the Supreme Being that guide them and assist them in their lives. "We live because Mukuru gives us life, and when we die we are not lost" (Crandall 24). The Himba believe that it is the will of Murkuru that they live and they will be saved when they are dead. "The Himba believed that ...


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... away from the norm.
Himba’s collective world revolves around Mukuru, the ancestors, and omiti. Most people in the Himba society try to follow the system in their society; some diverge and deviate away through different interpretations and perspectives. The Himba society, like other societies in our world has expectations and contributions that each individual makes in the society. Each individual in the society contributes through their own perspective of the world. Although, people have different opinions and deviance, they live and work together through the common belief of the Himba Society. The individuals in the Himba society that have personal views and opinions of the world reinforce individualism and the different traits that all human beings share. In any society in our world we see individualism and traits that distinguishes us as individuals.







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