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Teaching about Prejudice through To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

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Why should To Kill a Mockingbird be published? One good reason is because To Kill a Mockingbird is a great read about the human dignity that connects people of all sorts. It helps students realize that life was not exactly fair in the 1930s. The lack of humane behavior is shocking and will arouse some students, plus increase their knowledge of history in the 1930s by way of telling the story through a child’s perspective.
In To Kill a Mockingbird, there were numerous examples of American realities that can relate to those of today. For instance, Southern women followed some sort of southern code of conduct, because most ladies conducted themselves in the same manner. They all grew into women who were well-mannered, wore frilly, lacy dresses, and were rather good at embroidery. An example of this is when Aunt Alexandra comes to the Finch house to help take care of Jem and Scout while Atticus is at the trial fighting for Tom Robinson. Aunt Alexandra explained that “It won’t be many years, Jean Louise, before you become interested in clothes and boys” (Lee 127). This comment suggests ...


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