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Success vs. Wishes in the Joy Luck Club Essay

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Imagine a relationship between a coach and a player. The job of the coach is to make his student better at the sport; therefore, he puts pressure upon the player and expects him to show off the skills that he teaches him. This pressure and expectation can lead to the player winning or losing depending on the player’s motivation. Also, depending upon the result of the competition, the coach and the player can have a strong relationship or a weak one with growing distances and irritation if the two do not get along. Likewise, in the novel, The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan, the mothers develop many expectations of their daughters as they begin to worry about their daughters’ future. Although having expectations from a child can lead to a negative effect in a relationship, it can also have a positive outcome in a relationship.
One type of effect the Chinese mothers’ expectations has in their relationship with their “Americanized” daughter is negative since the mothers are unable to achieve anything. An-Mei Hsu expects her daughter to listen and obey as the young ones do in Chinese culture, but instead receives a rebellious and stubborn daughter, “‘You only have to listen to me.’ And I cried, ‘But Old Mr. Chou listens to you too.’ More than thirty years later, my mother was still trying to make me listen’” (186-187). Instead of the circumstances improving, the mother is never able to achieve anything; her forcing and pushing her daughter to the Chinese culture goes to a waste. They are both similar in this sense because both are stubborn; the daughter learns to be stubborn through American culture and wants to keep herself the way she is, whereas the mother wants to remove this teaching from American culture and does not give u...


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... freedom which leads to disobedience; the point that English eventually leads to disobedience makes the mothers unhappy and becomes a factor that causes a difference between them. Hopes can lead to various outcomes; sometimes they are completed whereas sometimes they remain as wishes.
A person may have the desire to do everything but it is only one or two things he can do in life. Especially today, although nothing is impossible, it is highly unlikely for one to be able to do all the desired things in life because of how there are too many people competing for the same thing or it takes a lot of effort and dedication to keep up and work hard until reaching the goal. Therefore, humans are given the ability to choose between things because having too many expectations or too few is not good. When these hopes are shattered, they result in a very negative outcome.


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