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Your search returned over 400 essays for "to kill a mockingbird"
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Review of To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Review of To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird" made a significant impact on me as it made me aware of the necessity to offer tolerance and understanding to other people. "To Kill A Mockingbird" is set in Alabama, South America 1933-1935. 6-year-old Scout, a young girl living in the old tired town of Maycomb, narrates the novel. Using a young girl enables Harper Lee to explore the issue of racial prejudices in a humorous manner. The novel is about a series of events experienced by Scout as she matures over the two-year period concentrating mainly on the trial of Tom Robinson....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1533 words
(4.4 pages)
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Themes in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Some books are written to prove a point or some sort of idea. The novel, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, is an excellent example of proving a point or a theme. Themes in the book include courage, lady, standing in another man's shoes, it's not time to worry, education, and trash. All the themes stand out, however, three in particular are exemplified in the book. The three main themes in To Kill a Mockingbird are courage, lady, and standing in another man's shoes. The first theme is courage....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1105 words
(3.2 pages)
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Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee “To better understand a person you have to climb up inside their skin and walk around in it.” The quote previously stated by Atticus in the book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is an unveiling of the upcoming forms of prejudice. The setting for the novel is a fictitious town called Maycomb. This town is situated in Alabama. The racial prejudice shown in the novel has a lot to do with the town being situated in the southern United States. The backwardness and narrow-mindedness of the community fueled racism in Maycomb....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2869 words
(8.2 pages)
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Prejudice Runs Deep in To Kill A Mockingbird - Prejudice Runs Deep in To Kill A Mockingbird   To Kill A Mockingbird takes place in small town Maycomb, Alabama, a depression era town where people move slowly and twenty-four hours seems longer.  The narrator of the story is a six-year-old girl named Jean Louise Finch, a tomboy who hates wearing dresses and goes by the nickname "Scout."  Scout's being a tomboy is of no little significance because while we are treated to a sweet and affectionate portrayal of Maycomb at the novel's opening, we will find it is a town where racial prejudice, hostility and ignorance run deep below the surface.  Not only are the majority of the townspeople prejudiced against blacks, maintaining a feeling of su...   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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1665 words
(4.8 pages)
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Themes In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, may appear to be a simple story about childhood and life in a Southern town, but upon close examination it is a complex novel dealing with themes of education, moral courage, and tolerance. Through the eyes of Scout Finch, the young protagonist, novelist Harper Lee educates the reader about the importance of a moral education, as opposed to a formal education, the difference between traditional bravery and moral courage, and prejudice vs. tolerance. In the early chapters of the novel, Scout Finch joins her brother Jem at school....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1056 words
(3 pages)
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Essay on Character Parallels in To Kill a Mockingbird - Character Parallels in To Kill a Mockingbird       In real life there are many different types of people, some of them are similar to one another, while others can be opposite/different, just like in the book To Kill a Mocking Bird, by Harper Lee. There are many people in the book, some people are contradictory to one another (character foils), while others resemble each other (character parallels) in both good and/or bad ways. Atticus Finch and Aunt Alexander is an example of a character foil in the book....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 462 words
(1.3 pages)
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The Mrs Dubose Episode in To Kill A Mockingbird? - How important is the Mrs Dubose episode in To Kill A Mockingbird. 'To Kill A Mockingbird' is an important novel as it deals with numerous issues such as; growing up, prejudice, tolerance, understanding of others and courage. This well written story by Harper Lee focuses on a family living in Maycomb County, a microcosm of American Society concerned with only its own problems, in the 1930's. The main plot of this novel concerns a black man being wrongly accused and charged with the rape of a white woman and, due to the racial unfairness that took place at this time, he is convicted....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2287 words
(6.5 pages)
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Summary of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The book To Kill a Mockingbird was written by Harper Lee. It was published in 1960 then it went on to win the Pulitzer prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award winning film. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American Literature. There are so many characters in this book that I can't name all of them. Here are most of the characters. The Finch family contains of Atticus (The head of the household), Aunt Alexandra (Atticus's sister), (Jem) Jeremy (The oldest of Atticus's two children), (Scout) Jean Louise (The youngest of the two ....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1161 words
(3.3 pages)
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Racial themes in the film To Kill A Mockingbird - Racial themes in the film To Kill A Mockingbird Racial categories are created in the film To Kill A Mockingbird through a complex societal hierarchy founded in difference. Although all of Macon county lives in poverty, the town does not unite on the basis of this shared experience, but instead focuses on their differences, both real and imagined, to segregate themselves. The town operates under a general assumption that wealthier whites hold the most power and prestige, followed by poorer whites, while all blacks, regardless of financial station, are considered to be the lowest citizens....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 835 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Layers of Mrs. Dubose in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Layers of Mrs. Dubose in To Kill a Mockingbird        Toothpaste: it is made up of so many different ingredients. You can look at a tube of toothpaste, study it, observe the colors of the plastic container and notice the size and shape of it. You can guess all you want what's on the inside, but you will never know until it is squeezed. People: they are made up of so many different things. You can look at them, study their behaviors, and observe their appearances. You can make many assumptions about what they're like on the inside, but you will never know their true character until they are squeezed....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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1108 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird - Relationship of Two Characters - To Kill A Mockingbird - Relationship of Two Characters In the beginning, all was good and calm in the lives of the Finches. Members of the family included Atticus, Jem, Scout, Aunt Alexandra, and Calpurnia. The relationship of two of the main characters, Atticus and Jem, is of particular interest. In the beginning section of To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the relationship of Atticus and Jem is simple. Jem sees Atticus as older and less active then the fathers of his friends at school....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1048 words
(3 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay: Use of Symbolism - Use of Symbolism in To Kill A Mockingbird "I'd rather you shoot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you'll go after birds. Shoot all the bluejays you want , if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." This is what Atticus Finch tells his children after they are given air-rifles for Christmas. Uniquely, the title of the classic novel by Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird, was taken from this passage. At first glance, one may wonder why Harper Lee decided to name her book after what seems to be a rather insignificant excerpt....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1709 words
(4.9 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird - The Character of Atticus Finch - To Kill a Mockingbird - The Character of Atticus Finch Kind and understanding, strict but fair, Atticus Finch embodies everything that a father should be. A man of great strength and courage, he is Scout and Jem's hero; the steady presence that keeps them grounded and their only connection to the adult world. He is their teacher, their protector, and their friend. He takes on these responsibilities without hesitation, and cares far Scout and Jem the only way he knows how. Some say it's a misguided effort at parenthood, but the reader sees that Atticus' episodes with his children are what make him an exemplary father....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 564 words
(1.6 pages)
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Respect in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird -Respect Respect is something you earn by being a good person or doing something admirable. All of the citizens of Maycomb look up to Atticus and see him as a respectable person. Atticus is the character in the novel that has the most respect. He is a caring, loving father, the only member of Maycomb who will actually defend a negro, and he always displays respect for other people. Atticus is a great leader of his family, teaching his children morals and life lessons....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 485 words
(1.4 pages)
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Use of Minor Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird - In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, a range of both major and minor characters which are portrayed with varying personalities. These character's interactions help to explain the issues that this text is concerned with. In the novel, the protagonist, Atticus Finch, is a defence lawyer who is appointed to represent a black man, Tom Robinson, who is charged with raping a white woman. The novel is set during the 1930s in America, which was when segregation of blacks and whites was well manifested into the society of those days....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 680 words
(1.9 pages)
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Use of Symbols and Symbolism in To Kill A Mockingbird - Use of Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee effectively uses symbolism throughout her novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Jem's nursing of the flowers denotes his courage that he nurses in order to be able to tolerate people's criticism of his family, especially of his father. He was forced to take care of the camellias just as he was forced to live with anger, disappointment and a big question mark in his young heart about the workings of grownups. Atticus "never thought Jem'd be the one to lose his head over this" (110)....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1116 words
(3.2 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essays: Great Courage - Courage in To Kill A Mockingbird Courage is shown within the characters of To Kill A Mockingbird in several situations. The characters are challenged to face danger or pain without fear. The courage they display gives them strength and deepens their self-understanding as the novel progresses. Early in the novel, Scout illustrates the courage she embodies. On her first day of school, Scout acts as an ambassador for the entire class. She takes the duty of informing Miss Caroline of Walter Cunningham's situation....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1053 words
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The Trial in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The Trial in To Kill a Mockingbird The trial of Tom takes up a great deal of space in the novel because it gives Harper Lee a chance to do an in-depth exploration of characters and situations. The people involved in the case are Bob and Mayella Ewell, Tom Robinson and Atticus Finch. The alleged rape of Mayella by Tom allows Harper Lee to look in detail at issues of racial and social prejudice in Maycomb. Bob Ewell is the villain of the novel and, as a result of the trial, he tries to get revenge on Atticus and his family....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1127 words
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Bravery in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Bravery in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Bravery, a quality of spirit that enables you to face danger of pain without showing fear, felling no fear. No fear is what Atticus Finch showed throughout the whole novel. Bravery can be anything. Facing a bully, or even living up to your fears. Bravery is used in everyday life. Atticus Finch was the bravest person in this novel. Atticus was under a lot of pressure defending Tom Robinson by all the other white men in the town. Atticus stood up to the men, his own race and showed them that he wasn't going to back down from the case....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 522 words
(1.5 pages)
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Fear in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Fear in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Fear is an important force in the novel because it is the cause of most people's action. The main theme in the book is a result of fear such as the Tom Robinson case and Boo Radley. Ignorance breeds fear which in turn breeds prejudice. Fear is infectious, and each character in the book is affected by other people's fear. Hence, the people in Southern town are always afraid. Lee is able to explore fear in the novel most effectively by seeing how individual characters are affected by it....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1576 words
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Racism in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Racism in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee "Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up is something I don't pretend to understand" [1] This is Maycomb's usual disease; the disease is prejudice, which includes racism sexism, difference in class, piety and other prejudiced opinions formed in the small county of Maycomb. In Harper Lee's Novel racism is described through the eyes of a nine-year old girl Scout, which still has not been affected by the disease that is overcoming the town....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 891 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird, Chapter 20 Analysis - In chapter 20 of “To kill a Mockingbird”, Harper Lee wrote about the great divide between black and white people in Maycomb County, and why the public should not judge them too harshly. The Author explains all this through Atticus who is fighting on Tom Robinson’s behalf, that Tom did not rape Mayella Ewell. Atticus tried to persuade the jury beyond reasonable doubt, that Mayella was simply claiming Tom had raped her, to cover up for her wanting to kiss and tempt Tom Robinson (A black man). Atticus explained that Mayella had obviously broken no law, but “a rigid and time-honoured code of their society” and whoever broke this code would be “hounded from their midst as unfit to live with” (pa...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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To Kill a Mockingbird Essays - Atticus Finch - Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, Harper Lee's, To Kill a Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior, to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, and the struggle between blacks and whites. Atticus Finch, a lawyer and single parent in a small southern town in the 1930's, is appointed by the local judge to defend Tom Robinson, a black man, who is accused of raping a white woman. Friends and neighbors object when Atticus puts up a strong and spirited defense on behalf of the accused black man....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1095 words
(3.1 pages)
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Chapters 1- 6 of To Kill A Mockingbird - The first five chapters of To Kill a Mockingbird introduce the setting, atmosphere, theme, and many different characters, who have unique characteristics. The theme of prejudice is also developed in this introductory section. The Finch family and some of their neighbours are introduced as well, along with important elements such as the Radley house. The Radley house is an important element of mystery in the beginning chapters. As Scout was describing the setting, she described the mysterious house by saying, “The Radley Place was inhabited by an unknown entity the mere description of whom was enough to make us behave for days on end,” (Lee 6)....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 810 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essays: Discrimination and Prejudice - Discrimination and Prejudice in To Kill A Mocking Bird           Discrimination and prejudice were very common acts in the early and middle 1900's. Prejudice in this book is displayed by the acts of hate and misunderstanding because of someone's color. People of color were the majority that were treated unfairly. During this time in the southern states, black people had to use separate bathrooms, drinking fountains, sections in restaurants, churches, and even go to separate schools. Although much of the discrimination was directed towards blacks, there were plenty of accounts towards impoverished families by those that had money....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1388 words
(4 pages)
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Mrs.Dubose in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Mrs.Dubose in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird The character Mrs. Dubose is met by the reader in chapter 11 of the novel, and is used as a dramatic device through out that chapter. This technique from the author of Mrs. Dubose helps the reader to fully comprehend how much of a good neighbour she is to the Finch family, and also her true good qualities. From the beginning of chapter, Scout makes her feelings towards Mrs. Dubose very clear, by stating that "she was vicious", and that "Jem and I hated her"....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1145 words
(3.3 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird: Jem Grows Up - To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, has won many prestigious awards and is still a very classic and appreciated book in our society today. Jem, a character in the book, grows up and realizes that you have to step in someone else’s shoes to understand why they make the decisions that they make. Once Jem saw that the knot-hole in the tree was filled with cement he started crying because he stepped into Boo Radley’s shoes. Also, When Jem learned that Mrs. Dubose had died, he stepped into her shoes and then felt sorry for her....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 619 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Theme of Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Theme of Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird ‘To Kill a Mocking Bird’ teaches us about the deceit and prejudice amongst the residents of Maycomb County, all of whom have very contrasting and conflicting views. We are told the story through the eyes of little girl, Scout, and the day-to-day prejudices she faces amongst society. Her father, Atticus, is a white man defending a Negro, even though the town frowns upon such a thing. He is trying to bring order to the socially segregating views, both within the court and out....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee Prejudice Essays] 2555 words
(7.3 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Courage is the quality of mind that enables one to face danger with confidence, resolution, and gain a firm control of oneself. Many of the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird showed courage in their own way. Courage can come in many different forms: physical, mental, emotional and moral. Courage is not the only main theme displayed in To Kill a Mockingbird; prejudice and education are also very important themes exhibited throughout the progression of the novel....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird Harper Lee Essays Courage] 1052 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - A. Setting: 1. Year: 1940’s 2. Location: Maycomb, Alabama 3. Period of Time: Three Summer’s B. Point of Veiw: First Person C. Begining: Scout, the main character and narrorator of the story, Jem, her brother, and Dill, their neighbor friend that visited every summer, loved to act out stories they knew. They did all kinds of stories like Tarzan and Dracula. Signaling the end of summer and the absence of Dill, the school year began. Scout started school, having a very rough first day....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 523 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird In the novel by Harper Lee named, To Kill a Mockingbird, there is one main tragic event that occurs. The feelings and expressions dealt with in the novel are seen through the eyes of the main character, named Scout. In the novel Tom Robinson is a black male accused of rape in Maycomb County. During the same time period as the novel there were many historical events that were almost identical in setting and conclusion. There were many things that happened leading up to the court case that foreshadowed Tom Robinson’s inability to be found innocent of the charges....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Racism Essays]
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(3.9 pages)
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Scout's Maturation in Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird: An Essay about Miss Maudie’s Impact in Scout’s Life - As a child grows, many people influence their development as a person. Some people impact more than others, and a select few really leave their mark. In Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird,” several characters play this role. Among them, Miss Maudie Atkinson, a woman who proves herself a strong character, prevails as the one who has the greatest impact on Scout Finch, the protagonist of this novel. As Scout matures and grows up, her views on the world around her change. Through subtle yet effective ways, Miss Maudie teaches Scout many life lessons about being humble, judging, and attitude, all of which ultimately have a great effect on the kind of person Scout develops into and her outlook o...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 1167 words
(3.3 pages)
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How Atticus Tells Scout about Unjust, Prejudiced Courts in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The court systems had many flaws and injustices toward African Americans in the 1930’s. This story takes place in Maycomb County in the midst of the depression. In the first half of the book Atticus gets the Tom Robinson case and Dill, Jem, and Scout are extremely fascinated with Boo Radley. In the second half Harper Lee shows the true color of Maycomb through the case of Tom Robinson. All of this is told from Scouts perspective. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee, Atticus Finches influences on his daughter Scout is made clear through the importance he places on education, the admiral ways he practices law, and through his effective interactions with Maycombs residents...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 671 words
(1.9 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Scout Finch is not the stereotypical girl from the 1930’s. Agents the wishes of everyone around her, she grows up in overalls instead of dresses. Scout plays in the dirt and sand, instead of in the kitchen. In the novel To Kill a Mocking Bird, by Harper Lee, Scout is the wild spirited narrator, growing up in the small town of Maycomb. As she gets older, she learns mostly from her father Atticus how to interact with people. Scout learns to show dignity and respect to everyone, under any circumstances....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 563 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - It’s interesting to see the ways different authors depict how a character matures. In Harper Lee’s novel, To Kill a Mocking Bird we can easily see how she chose to do it. The novel is set in Alabama in the 1930’s, while black vs. white racism was a big issue and problem for many. Atticus is the father of Scout and Jem, young children who witness the discrimination first hand when their father, a white man, defends a black man in court. Lee does a great job developing the characters; especially the narrator, Jean Louise Finch (Scout)....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1068 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay - Modes of Communication in To Kill a Mockingbird Effective communication is a result of the utilization of different techniques to convey a particular idea or perspective. Different methods used to express a person's feelings are found throughout society and aid in creating a learned individual, family, and community. In the novel To Kill a Mocking Bird, Harper Lee uses several modes of communication to display her feelings on moral, political, and social issues. Lee's tactics parallel those used by one character in her novel, Atticus Finch....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 2012 words
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Prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was written by Harper Lee in 1960. Nelle Harper Lee was born on April 28, 1926 in Monroeville, Alabama, a city of about 7,000 people. She studied law at the University of Alabama and one year at Oxford University. After giving up working as a clerk for an airline she moved into a cold-water apartment in New York to concentrate on writing. She first handed this book to a publisher in 1957 but it was rejected so she took two further years to rework it before it was published as ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ in 1960....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 6279 words
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Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee is a story of national magnitude that contains complex characters. Harper Lee deals with the emotions and spirits of the characters insightfully. A few of these characters display courage at one point or another in the story. These flashes of courage come during turbulent times of the story, and often led to success. Atticus Finch displayed courage on numerous occasions. Without his wife he had to raise Jem and Scout alone for most of their lives....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee Essays] 1327 words
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Cultures in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ is a brilliantly written novel by Harper Lee. The novel is set in Alabama, USA, in the 1930’s and tells the story of a lawyer who defends a wrongly accused black man while trying to raise his two children, Scout and Jem, as they go through childhood and adolescence, life’s most active learning stages. The book is written through the eyes of Atticus’ naïve young daughter, Scout, and southern ways enhance the plot of the story to give it a realistic and historical perspective....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 4930 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - As readers, we saw Scout mature and grow as our narrator and as a person. She learned many things, but also lost many things. As she grew up and changed, she began to see how things really were, and gained the knowledge of the pure hate that one man can show another. Scout lost her innocence when she found this out. She began to see how cruel the world could be to someone who is a little different or strange. She saw this in the prejudice that was shown to Tom Robinson, Walter Cunningham, Miss Maudie and even herself....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2044 words
(5.8 pages)
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Hypothetical Sountrack for To Kill A Mockingbird - "Sugar We're Going Down" Fall Out Boy pp. 75-76 I chose "Sugar We're Going Down" because Atticus decides to defend Tom Robinson. Lines 9 and 10 say, "We're going down, down in an earlier round and sugar we're going down swinging." This relates to the book in that Atticus knows that he will lose the case, but will try his hardest because he knows it is the right thing to do. "Landslide" Fleetwood Mac p. 115-117 Lines 10 through 13 of the song "Landslide" talk about how things change and "children get older." Scout is bothered by how her brother is changing because he is getting older....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 830 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - It all started when a girl named Jean Louise Finch, (Scout) was telling the story about her brother and how he broke his arm at the elbow. She went back two years to where they had tried to “Make Boo come out.” Boo Radley, also known as Arthur Radley. Back before Jem and Scout were even born Arthur Radley and his family moved to Maycomb. There was Arthur, his older brother Nathan, and Mr. and Mrs. Radley. There was a story about the Radleys, saying that when their family moved into town, they were welcomed but chose to stick to themselves....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2844 words
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A Continuation of To Kill a Mockingbird - The day after my twelfth birthday, the money had almost completely burned a hole in my pocket. Scout and I started to town in the early afternoon to purchase a steam engine for me and a twirling baton for her. We took our normal path, right by Miss Dubose's house and unfortunately, she was out on the porch. "Where are you going at this time of day?" she shouted. "Playing hooky, I suppose. I'll just call the principal and tell him!" She looked like the ugliest thing I had ever seen. Oh, did I ever hate her....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 592 words
(1.7 pages)
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Symbols and Symbolism in To Kill A Mockingbird - Symbols, Themes and Characters - To Kill A Mockingbird - Symbols, Themes and Characters Now, you're probably wondering what is To Kill A Mockingbird all about. Well that is what I am going to be telling you about in this paper. You will find out that To Kill A Mockingbird is full of different themes, symbols, conflicts and many different characters. There is a theme of a coexistence of good and evil in this novel. Harper dramatizes Scout and Jem's transition from a perspective of childhood innocence. Many of the characters assume that people are good because they have never seen evil....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 926 words
(2.6 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essays: Boo and Tom Misunderstood - Boo and Tom Misunderstood in To Kill a Mockingbird In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, Atticus tells Jem and Scout to, "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird," he is referring to the notion that a mockingbird is a harmless creature and does nothing but sing and bring happiness to the world. Harper Lee takes the title for her novel from this passage because the imagery of the mockingbird is analogous to the characters of both Boo Radley and Tom Robinson....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1066 words
(3 pages)
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Us of Symbols in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Question; Describe an important symbol or symbols in the text you have studied and analyse how the symbol helped to develop ideas in the text. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee is a story of racial prejudice and social class set in a time when such narrow-mindedness was considered acceptable and apart of every day life in the small town of Maycomb, Alabama. Narrated and based around Scout (Jean Louise) Finch and the many ordeals she and her brother (Jem) face in the years of their growing up; out of the childhood innocence they once possessed to realise the true evils of their community and shed false pretences surrounding the innocence of two such characters as Boo Radley and Tom Robinson...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1191 words
(3.4 pages)
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Rabid Dogs And Hybrid Snowmen: Symbolism In To Kill A Mockingbird - The plots and themes of this classic American literature have come under consideration and review many times, but not enough readers take notice to all of the metaphors and symbolism that are intertwined with the text. While To Kill a Mockingbird has many values of equality on the surface, the hidden meanings and symbolism allow it to take a deeper stance than one might notice right away. A few notable examples are the encounter with the rabid dog, the mud-and-snow man, Atticus’s light at the prison house, and, of course, the references to mockingbirds....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird] 1133 words
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Connections between Boo and Tom in to Kill a Mockingbird - Connections between Boo and Tom in to Kill a Mockingbird ======================================================== Harper Lee seems to be telling toe different stories, that of Boo and Tom. Are there any connections between the storied. Although the novel seems to be telling two different stories, that of Tom Robinson and Boo Radley there are some connections between the stories. The first connection I'd like to highlight is that both Tom and Boo are Mockingbird figures. We know that Atticus and also Miss Maudie tell the children, and I quote, " Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy they don't do one thing but sing their hearts out for us....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 936 words
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The Significance of the Title To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The Significance of the Title To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee In this novel the most significant symbol is the mocking bird. A mocking bird is a type of Finch: a small, discrete bird with a beautiful song, which 'mocks' or imitates the other birds' song. One of the most explicit references made about mocking birds is that in chapter 10. Atticus is telling Scout and Jem how top use their shotguns for the first time, he says, 'Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit'em but remember it's a sign to kill a Mockingbird.' Harper Lee uses symbolism implicitly to liken mocking birds to certain characters and explicit references to describe the atmosphere cr...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1088 words
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Harper Lee's Treatment of Black People in To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's Treatment of Black People in To Kill a Mockingbird "To kill a mockingbird" is set in a small imaginary town in the southern states of America and is described to us as the sort of town which houses a lot of small minded people who only care for themselves. We see that these people have an apparent problem with anyone who is different from themselves; the main example being black people. It is likely that they feel threatened by those different from them as they cannot understand them....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1572 words
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Boo Radley and Tom Robinson in To Kill A Mockingbird - Boo Radley and Tom Robinson come from very different backgrounds. Both face similar stories of prejudice and unfair judgments. These men faced some of the same hardships throughout their lives. Boo and Tom are both good men who were put down because they are considered “different” than others in the town. Scout learns important lessons from the way the people in town treat Boo and Tom. The title of the book To Kill A Mockingbird takes on different meanings as the author tells the story of these two men from the south....   [tags: Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird] 513 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The Importance of Atticus Finch - The Importance of Atticus Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird    The core character of a novel is responsible for maintaining the stability of society within the novel, exhibiting qualities of a true hero, and constantly emphasizing the novel’s central themes.  In the classic, To Kill A Mockingbird, Atticus Finch serves as the core of the novel by displaying a character of stability, humility, and high moral standards.        Atticus Finch is a character of stability in an unstable society.  He is a balanced figure who is able to cope with the unreasonable and highly emotional town in which he lives.  He can manage the prejudiced white masses and still deal justly with the underprivileged Neg...   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 714 words
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Critical Analysis of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Critical Analysis of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird I will present a critical analysis on the film 'To kill a Mockingbird' which is based on the award winning novel by Harper Lee. To kill a Mockingbird is a film where a courageous, warm hearted and distinguished lawyer takes a case on board to defend a black mans human rights. His compassionate defence against the civil liberties of an exceedingly marginalised black man, Tom Robinson and their human rights and individual liberties in general, cost's him friendships and the town's respect....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 921 words
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Mythology and Archetypes in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Mythology and Archetypes in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird       Of all the various approaches to criticism, the Mythological/Archetypal achieves the greatest impact over the entire literary scope, because the themes and patterns unearthed apply universally to all works, yielding results that can be applied to a great many texts. This is because the very nature of the Mythological/Archetypal approach is the exploration of the canon for widespread and pervading symbols, plots, and characters....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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Ethical Dilemmas in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Ethical Dilemmas in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird Black and white, right and wrong; do decisions that simple and clear even exist. Does a decision ever mean gaining everything without giving anything up. Many characters in To Kill A Mockingbird are forced to make difficult, heart wrenching decisions that have no clear right answer. Harper Lee presents many of these important decisions in To Kill A Mockingbird as ethical dilemmas, or situations that require a choice between two difficult alternatives....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1983 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird - Changes in the Characters Thought the Novel - To Kill A Mockingbird - Changes in the Characters Thought the Novel In the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird" each of the main characters changed quite a bit. Through the experiences each character went through and the natural maturing that occurred in each of them, the characters were altered from the way they were at beginning of the book. The children, Scout and Jem, were the two most dramatically changed characters. However, Scout showed much more change than Jem did because of his mysterious hidden attitude....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 870 words
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Support for Black people in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Support for Black people in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee takes place in Alabama through the 1930's . Harper Lee explores the life of two young children , and the flaws of society they must overcome . Throughout this time period black citizens are mistreated by a majority of white citizens . In To Kill a Mockingbird , Harper Lee creates a supportive and positive portrayal of black citizens . One way which Harper Lee creates a supportive and positive portrayal is through showing the injustice that the black citizens go through ....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 697 words
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The Issue of Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The Issue of Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Works Cited Not Included Innocence - Children are born innocent. They learn prejudice from society: from their parents and the adults around them. The Mockingbird acts as a metaphor for innocence as Atticus states " Shoot all the blue jays you want …….. but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." Pg 98 The book begins by portraying the innocence and world of play of a tomboyish six year old girl and her ten year old brother....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1193 words
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Tom Robinson in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Question: Choose a character out of the novel; describe the characters personality and placement in the novel. Answer the following questions: - How does the character relate to the Finch family. - How does the Finch family feel about the character. - Why do they respond to the character like this. (Silke Lösch, Calantha Lyle, Hayley Slade and Elonie Taylor.) In the novel ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ written by Harper Lee the Finch family are known in Maycomb County by everyone, whether through their eyes it’s for a good reason or bad reason....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 913 words
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Many characters in To Kill A Mockingbird are isolated from mainstream - Many characters in To Kill A Mockingbird are isolated from mainstream society. Discuss the ways in which Atticus Finch and one other character are set apart from the society of Maycomb To Kill A Mockingbird was set in the 1930s in the south of USA, Alabama. At that period, slavery had already been made illegal. But people in the south were a bitter about it because they still believed that they needed the slaves to maintain their cotton farms. They didn't treat the blacks as though they had the same social status as them and basically still treated them as though they were still slaves....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 3095 words
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Hypocrisy and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Despite cultures and conflicts, the fundamental bonds remain: We all belong to a common family. The book, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee is a timeless classic about coming of age in a small southern town in the 1930’s. The book follows Jem and Scout, two siblings, who must face the harsh realities of life. Hypocrisy and racism together make the two most important themes. Hypocrisy is as much a part of Maycomb’s society as church and community spirit. For example, Mrs. Merriweather talks about saving the poor Mruans from Africa, but she thinks black people in her community are a disgrace (p.234)....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 461 words
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Racist Society in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Racist Society in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird The way I perceive racism would be discrimination and prejudice against somebody with a different skin colour or ethical background. In To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee uses racial prejudice as the main subject matter either towards a single person (for example, Tom Robinson) or towards groups of people (for example, the black community in Maycomb.) To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the 1930's. This is when the blacks have gained equal rights with white people....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 882 words
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Jem's Maturing in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Jem's Maturing in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird When children grow up, they face difficult problems, and. they learn to cope and take responsibility. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is a flashback about two kids that spans over a few years. Jem ages from ten to thirteen over the course of the novel, and undergoes much change, as his sister describes him. Over the years, he is exposed to issues adults face, and eventually shows an understanding of racism and innocence. As Jem grows up, his view on courage also changes....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird] 1007 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay: Southern Tradition Exposed - Southerners are known to be proud of their traditional beliefs. To Kill A Mockingbird allows its readers to question and consider those beliefs. Maycomb represents a typical old southern town. Not many people move into Maycomb and not many people who live there journey beyond its boundaries. As a result, the opinions held by many of the citizens of Maycomb are left to grow and foster in the same families for many generations. The circumstances in Maycomb are less than ideal for generating change and more prone to sustaining traditionally accepted codes....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1939 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird - The Powerful Character of Atticus Finch - To Kill a Mockingbird - The Powerful Character of Atticus Finch In the beginning epigraph of To Kill a Mocking Bird, Harper Lee quotes a statement made by Charles Lamb: "Lawyers, I suppose, were children once." As told through the eyes of the rambunctious elementary school child, Scout Finch, we see not only how she and her brother's lives are affected by their community, also how they develop and mature under the watch of their father, lawyer Atticus Finch. As a wise role model to his town of Maycomb as well as his children, Atticus Finch becomes a prominently admirable character....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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Atticus Finch of Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Atticus Finch of Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird In the novel "To Kill A Mockingbird", by Harper Lee, Atticus Finch is a most compelling character. Atticus grew up on a cotton farm and eventually became a defence lawyer. He is the voice of reason in the town of Maycomb and many of the people in the county are his clients. He served four years in the state legislature. He has two children, Scout and Jem, and his wife died when Scout was only two.He is self-educated, and tries to encourage his children to have a love of learning and enjoy literature as much as he does....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1065 words
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Study of Families in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Study of Families in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Families are very important in To Kill a Mockingbird. In Maycomb being established in society is very important for the residents of the town. As are family values. At the beginning of the story Scout describes how important it is to have a good family history. This importance of having a good family background is a theme that runs throughout the book. " Being Southerners, it was a source of shame to some members of the family that we had no recorded ancestors on either side of the Battle of Hastings." (Scout, page 9) Miss Caroline is regarded with suspicion because she is an outsider....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1198 words
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The Three Families in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Harper Lee’s Novel “To Kill a Mockingbird and the Contrasts between three different families In Harpers Lee’s novel To Kill A Mockingbird, Lee has created three unique families. The Ewell’s were a family who lived like slavish animals, a perfect t mold of a stereotyped redneck. The Cunninghams too, are a poor family but they are very proud, much like a farmer type of stereotype who never took anything that they could not repay. The Finches are the most distinct and well respected by the whole town of Maycomb and have lived their life according to a code of values that they apply equally to everyone....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1261 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay: Use of Symbols and Symbolism - Use of Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird It is quite noticeable that some characters' names in To Kill a Mockingbird are implicitly symbolic. Scout, for example, like the familiar military scouts who were dispatched from the main body to gather information, is a seeker, scouting out new areas of experience. Additionally, Atticus's name is a reference to the district Attica of ancient Greece in which Athens was located. In some way Atticus's rational approach to life is similar to that of ancient philosophers, especially the Stoics: "The four cardinal virtues of the Stoic philosophy are wisdom, courage, justice and temperance....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1076 words
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Mrs. Dubose in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Mrs. Dubose in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee "…[Mrs. Dubose] had her own views about things, a lot different from mine… I wanted you to see something about her -- I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It's when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what…" (112). This is said by Atticus after Jem asks why Atticus makes him read to her. Atticus explains to Jem that Mrs....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 560 words
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Racial Prejudice and Oppression in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Racial Prejudice and Oppression in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird 'Democracy,' she said. 'Does anybody have a definition?' ... 'Equal rights for all, special privileges for none' (Lee 248). To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee's only novel, is a fictional story of racial oppression, set in Maycomb, A.L. in 1925 to 1935, loosely based on the events of the Scottsboro trials. Unlike the story however, the racial discrimination and oppression in the novel very accurately portrays what it was like in the 1920's and 1930's in the south....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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Jem as A Young Moral Man in To Kill A Mockingbird - A young boy growing up during the great depressions and racial discreteness’ between a persons race, will be affected dramatically especially in the situation of having a moral father stand against what is wrong. Harper Lee in To Kill a Mockingbird helps mould the young childish Jeremy Finch into a young mature man. In the trial of Tom Robinson, Jem undergoes a change in the way he envisions Maycomb county’s people, as well as his own personal beliefs. Jem also learns a valuable lesson with his relationship and time spent with Mrs....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 881 words
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Atticus Finch As A Heroic Character In To Kill A Mockingbird - Atticus Finch is a heroic character in To Kill A Mockingbird. A hero is a person who is known for certain achievements and qualities. Atticus is known for many qualities he displayed during the novel, as well as various achievements. This makes him a heroic character. Atticus Finch is a hero because he defended a black man in court, proved his abilities and intelligences, and cared for everybody equally. During a time when black people were thought to be lower than white people, Atticus defended a black man in court....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 911 words
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Theme of Courage in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Throughout To Kill a Mockingbird, courage is seen as a major theme. Not only in Atticus' fight for the freedom of Tom Robinson, but also in Mrs. Dubose's fight to die free of her morphine addiction. Atticus proves that courage is a moral act by taking on Tom Robinson?s case. Atticus is intelligent enough to know the battle is already lost, but still he remains the man he says he is, and fights anyway. He fights to the best of his ability, and fights to the end. This is the same case with Mrs. Dubose and her fight to die free of her drug problem....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 488 words
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Maycomb Society in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Discuss Harper Lee’s Presentation of Maycomb Society in to Kill a Mockingbird Maycomb is described as a “tired old town” where the inhabitants had “nowhere to go”. Maycomb is very similar to any small southern town in the 1930’s, sexism, racism and other prejudices are at a peak, and old traditions are carried out regularly. To Kill a Mockingbird revolves solely around family, community and society, the focus point of the book, the rape trial, would not have occurred if society had not looked down upon the black community....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 805 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay: The Truth About Boo Radley - The Truth About Boo Radley in To kill a Mockingbird   First impressions of people are often lasting impressions, especially in the minds of children.  Many times these impressions, aided by misunderstanding and prejudgment, cause unjust discrimination against an individual. To kill a Mockingbird depicts the themes of misunderstanding and prejudice that portray Arthur (Boo) Radley as a villain. Through the progressive revelation of Radley's character, the children realize that their negative impressions and fear of him were unfounded....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1613 words
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Social Prejudices in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Social Prejudices in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird North America has always had the division of Northern and Southern states within the continent. When Negroes were imported from their native country, most of them ended up in the Southern states, working mostly on cotton plantations. In 1850, over three million blacks lived in the slave states, the vast majority of them being slaves to white men. Generally, it was accepted by Southern whites that ‘all Negroes lie, all Negroes [were] basically immoral beings’ and that they were heathen, lazy and stupid....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1852 words
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The Culture of Alabama in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The Culture of Alabama in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee In this essay I will be attempting to answer the above question. "When it's a white man's word against a black man's, the white man always wins." This is the first point I will be looking at; racism. I will be looking at different situations throughout the novel, how the views of whites and blacks differ. This is the most important plot as it takes up the main plot of the novel. I will also be looking at how the community of Maycomb acts towards outsiders....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1447 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird: Character Analysis of Jem and Scout - To Kill a Mockingbird: Character Analysis of Jem and Scout      Imagine just two young kids maturing within a matter of years. Imagine that same two kids, experiencing or understanding things that they aren’t meant to at a young age. Jem and Scout were just like that. They have experienced many things that they shouldn’t have at their age. Scout on the other hand, seems to be the one maturing the most. Throughout this whole essay, you will learn about Jem and Scout’s attributes, personality, and how alike or different they are from each other....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 588 words
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Brotherly Love in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - The book To Kill A Mockingbird is set in the Great Depression. In this time of economic loss, racism is present in the county of Maycomb, Alabama. In this time of distress the presence of Brotherly love is important. In this troubled town there are many examples of brotherly love. The ones that stand out to me are: The relationship that Boo has with the children, Atticus and Tom Robinson, and the way that Calpurnia treats the Finch's. In this story Atticus defends Tom Robinson with compassion....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 495 words
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