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Your search returned over 400 essays for "to kill a mockingbird"
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To Kill a Mockingbird and American History - To Kill a Mockingbird and American History The book, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, has many different relations to American history. The book shows good examples of racism, working life, church, and many other things. The book takes place sometime in the 1930's. It's about two children named Jem and Scout. They are very imaginative kids always making up new games and other things to pass the time. In the beginning of the book they are obsessed with one of their neighbors, Boo Radley. They think that Boo is a crazy man that killed his parents....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 522 words
(1.5 pages)
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A Closer Look at Boo Radley's Eccentric Character in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Set in the 1940’s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird features a man named Arthur Radley, though the people of Maycomb know him as Boo. He is described as a malevolent phantom, hence his nickname, that eats cats and is over seven feet tall. Boo is known as the town recluse and madman. Nevertheless, there may be some reason for his eccentric behavior. As said by William Shakespeare, “Though this be madness, yet there is method in’t.” Boo Radley is the character in To Kill a Mockingbird that best portrays the idea of madness....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1205 words
(3.4 pages)
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Scottsboro Trial: The Real Trial of Tom Robinson in To Kill a Mockingbird - The historical Scottsboro Trial and the fictional trial of Tom Robinson in the book To Kill a Mockingbird have striking similarities that may or may not be coincidence. Both trials took place in Alabama during the same era of relentless prejudice and bias, which is a major factor in each of these cases. In both cases, the accusers were white women and the persecutors were black men; therefore the black men were immediately considered liars and “wrongdoers”, unlike the word of the white women, which was essentially the truth above the word of someone who was black....   [tags: Scottsboro Trial, To Kill a Mockingbird, ] 967 words
(2.8 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee To be educated is to obtain or develop a certain knowledge or skill by a learning process. There are many distinct learning processes, some more explicit than others. In the first part of To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, education, in one form or another, is very significant. Both inside and outside of the classroom, Scout continually gains experience through education from both her brother, Jem, or by her wise and tolerant father, Atticus Finch....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 830 words
(2.4 pages)
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Compassion and Tolerance in To Kill A Mockingbird - Do you not believe we need more compassion and tolerance in the world. Why can we not be like Atticus, Jem or Scout from To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. These characters show great compassion and tolerance throughout the novel despite the society they live in. They have the courage to stand up for what they believe in. Atticus shows great compassion and tolerance when he stands up for the Negroes. He stands up and represents Tom Robinson because he believes that everyone should be treated equally in the court of law....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
629 words
(1.8 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee To Kill A Mockingbird has several themes included in this classic novel. The theme of a book is defined by the dominating ideas in a literary work. It is an abstract concept that is made solid through the author's use of action, images, and characters. The main theme in this work is the reality of prejudice. Class, sex, and race are some of the prejudices present in the town of Maycomb.      Prejudice concerning one's class in society is dominant in the town of Maycomb....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 659 words
(1.9 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird Comparison and Contrast of the Characters of Bob Ewell and Atticus Finch In this essay I will introduce you to the two main characters in Harper Lee's book "To kill a mockingbird", comparing them in their attitudes and actions. Atticus Finch is a single father raising two children in the small town of Maycomb, Alabama. Atticus works as a lawyer believing in equal justice for all Americans regardless of race or religion. Bob Ewell is also a single father raising eight children who also lives in Maycomb....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 657 words
(1.9 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mockingbird In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, a character Atticus states; “Courage is when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.” Throughout history, there have been many courageous people who have strongly demonstrated the quality of courage. Courage is a reoccurring theme that Harper Lee chooses to emphasize throughout To Kill A Mockingbird that many of her characters pursue as a strong quality. However, courage is proven to be most evident through Atticus, Scout, and Calpurina....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1280 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Ewell Residence in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Ewell Residence in To Kill a Mockingbird In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee gives us a very detailed description of Robert Ewell, his family, and how he lives. A good example is the passage in which Robert Ewell testifies in the Tom Robinson Trial. This is a description of the Ewell's home as well as an insight into the Ewells themselves. We learn what kind of a father Robert is and the kind of life into which he has forced his eldest daughter, Mayella. We also see how the county of Maycomb cruelly discriminates against the black community even though they are more respectable than people like the Ewells....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1068 words
(3.1 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird by Horton Foote To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel set over sixty years ago in a foreign country, yet it has always been both popular and respected. Consider why the novel is still relevant to readers in 2015. Refer closely to events and characters in the text. ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ shows that even in the democratic society of the United States, there was discrimination and prejudice in the nineteen-thirties. Although this has been reduced there, in many other countries and regions these conditions still exist for minority groups....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1130 words
(3.2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - to kill a mockingbird To Kill A Mockingbird To Kill A Mockingbird is a great book written by Harper Lee. This book is about Tom Robinson trying to help a white girl named Mayella. All that Tom was trying to do was help that little white girl out, but he was alone with her. Bob Ewell Mayella's father said that Tom raped his daughter Mayella. He was just walking by and got asked to help a girl out so he did because he felt sorry for her. Those were three things leading to Tom Robinson's conviction....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 3884 words
(11.1 pages)
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Symbolism and Allegory in To Kill a Mockingbird - Symbolism and Allegory in To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee uses symbolism extensively throughout To Kill a Mockingbird,, and much of it refers to the problems of racism in the South during the early twentieth century. Harper Lee's effective use of racial symbolism and allegory can be seen by studying various examples from the book, namely the actions of the children, of the racist whites, and of Atticus Finch. One of the more effective allegories in the novel is the building of a snowman by Jem and Scout....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
3737 words
(10.7 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mockingbird Courage, the mental or morale strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty, is displayed in many different ways throughout Harper Lee¹s only published novel, To Kill A Mockingbird. To some, the courage manifested by the characters in this book is either offensive, or frivolous, but to those who realize the true meaning of this word, the fortitude and bravery exhibited by certain individuals is considered uncustomary. In fact, To Kill A Mockingbird revolves around courage, as the author of this book describes Jem and Scout¹s (the two main character¹s in the story) childhoods living in Maycomb County, and how, as they grow older , they lear...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1138 words
(3.3 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird, is a story about a trial in a small Alabama town, where a black man is accused of raping a white woman. In this essay I will share with you the setting, some of the characters, some incidents from the plot, the theme, and the point of view. To Kill a Mockingbird is set in Maycomb County, Alabama, in the early 1930's. The setting plays an enormous role in this story. Many of the events that take place in this book may not have taken place if the setting were different. For instance, if this book were set in New York City in 1999 the outcome of the trial may have been totally different....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 467 words
(1.3 pages)
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Stylistic Elements of To Kill A Mockingbird - The stylistic elements that an author chooses are instrumental in ensuring that the theme or tone that he or she wishes to convey is in fact conveyed to the reader. Harper Lee obviously realizes this, for in the novel To Kill A Mockingbird (Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird, [New York: Warner, 1982] 278) she wisely selects a distinctive style to relate the moving story of a young child discovering harsh truths regarding human nature The predominant stylistic element Miss Lee uses is her diction and choice of sentence length....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 611 words
(1.7 pages)
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Courage Demonstrated by Atticus, Boo and Scout in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, is a moving story about courage set against the prejudice in a small, Alabama town. Atticus tells his children that courage is standing up for what you believe in, even if you know you will lose. Atticus, Boo, and Scout show courage through standing up for what they believe in, even if they might lose by doing so. When Atticus chooses to defend Tom Robinson, he knows he will most likely lose the first trial. His friends and colleagues will talk behind his back for defending a black man under a capitol defense....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 566 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Theme of Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird -   The theme of prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird is much more than just a case of black and white. The entire novel is about prejudice in its' many forms, the most prominent case of prejudice is the hate between the blacks and whites. The whole town of Maycomb is based on stereotypes of it's inhabitants, that are passed down from generation to generation. Rumors run rampid and very little truth is usually in them.       "So Jem received most of his information from Miss Stephanie Crawford,      a neighbor scold, she said she knew the whole thing....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1377 words
(3.9 pages)
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Importance of the Trial in To Kill a Mockingbird - Importance of the Trial in To Kill a Mockingbird      The trial of Tom Robinson is central to our understanding of racial and social prejudice in Maycomb. Harper Lee uses Tom Robinson's 'crime' to bring tensions in the town to a head and the author uses the trial as a way of making the ideas behind such tensions explicit for the reader.   The two people involved in the so-called crime, Tom Robinson and Mayella Ewell, are at the very bottom of Maycomb society. Tom is black and Mayella one of the poorest of the poor whites....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1229 words
(3.5 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird - The Character of Dill - To Kill A Mockingbird - The Character of Dill From their first impression of Dill Scout and Jem feel that, Charles Baker Harris is a small, weedy, but oddly curious child whose name was "longer'n you are". At the initial meeting he was wearing "blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair was snow white and stuck to his head like duck fluff". Even though he seemed odd to Jem and Scout when he spoke of going to the cinema and seeing films like Dracula he automatically had their attention and respect....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 962 words
(2.7 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Walk in Another Man's Shoes ' You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view'; (30). Atticus Finch, a popular lawyer, and the father of the main character in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, teaches this lesson to his children. This idea does not just apply to Maycomb County in the 1930s, but to everyone everywhere. This story takes place in Maycomb, Alabama during the great depression. Most whites are very prejudiced and don't care to hear a Negro's opinions or thoughts on anything....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 689 words
(2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - “A man of courage flees towards the start of indifferent things.” In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee there are many dissimilar examples of courageous behavior. There are many different definitions of courage. Some people say that courage is being able to face their fears. Others say that courage is a person with a tough heart. In the novel, Lee describes courage as being “when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what" (p.112)....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 561 words
(1.6 pages)
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Racial Discrimination in To Kill a Mockingbird - To kill a mockingbird is an extremely powerful book highlighting the horrors of racial discrimination in the “Deep South” of the United States of America. Discuss. To kill a mockingbird is an extremely powerful book highlighting the horrors of racial discrimination in the “Deep South” of the United States of America. It focuses on the racial issues concerning a staunch, typically “white” country town in the “Deep South.” This essay however deals with the various trials and tribulations endured by a young girl during her schooling years....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 643 words
(1.8 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird, both as a novel and as a film, shows how time can change the way society views the importance of certain issues, such as racism. Because it was written during the civil rights movement, many people protested against it for conveying issues of prejudice between the north and the south. However, after time, the novel gradually became accepted. It is now a world-renowned classic, and it has won the Pulitzer Prize, as well as having made its way to the big screen....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
3438 words
(9.8 pages)
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Jem Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird - Jem Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird “To kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee is set a small town called Maycomb in Alabama, in the 1930s. The community of Maycomb is of mixed ethnicity and like most places of that time the white people believe they were the dominant race. The book is seen through the eyes of two children: Jem and Scout Finch who are growing up in this society. As Jem gets older he becomes conscious of the fact that this community and these adults who surround him are not always right and this makes him feel lost....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1229 words
(3.5 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mockingbird By: Harper Lee SUMMARY To Kill a Mockingbird opens with Dill coming to visit his Aunt for the summer. Dill becomes a good friend with the Finches, Jean-Louise, who is nicknamed Scout and her brother, Jeremy Finch, who is nicknamed Jem. They live with their father, Atticus, who is a lawyer who had been given a case to handle and did not have any choice but to receive it and work his best for his client. The case was about an African man, named Tom Robinson, who was accused of raping a white woman....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1585 words
(4.5 pages)
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Comparing 1930's Society, as Depicted in To Kill a Mockingbird with Present Day Society - Jean Louise “Scout” and Jem Finch experienced life in the 1930’s living in the small town of Maycomb, Alabama. Their childhood was a nonstop adventure that brought jocund days and testing trials that teenager’s today experience even with the world around us changing every day. The moral upbringings, educational importance, and the crime rate of small towns all contributed to the childhood memories that were built every day in Maycomb County. These attributes to childhood experiences have changed a lot over the vast time period between the 1930’s and 2000’s....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 864 words
(2.5 pages)
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Exploring Atticus as a Parent in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird - “What makes a good parent?” This is a very commonly asked question. There are many different parenting techniques, but which one is the best. There is not a right or wrong answer to this question, but there is a good and better. In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, two fatherly figures are displayed, Atticus Finch, and Bob Ewell. Atticus Finch is a single father raising two children in the small town of Maycomb, Alabama. Atticus works as a lawyer believing in equal justice for all Americans regardless of race or religion....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 656 words
(1.9 pages)
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America’s Racist Society Exposed in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - During the Great Depression, racism was a common practice in the southern states of the US. Negros and those who opposed the intolerance were often discriminated by the rest of the bias and ignorant society, who believed in white supremacy and superiority over the other races. Maycomb, a racist town, exemplify this discrimination, imperiously judging others they view as being dissimilar from themselves. In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, the author, weaves a brilliant story of prejudice, discrimination, and racism shown through the novel’s several characters and events, producing a mirror reflection of America’s racist society in the 1930’s....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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976 words
(2.8 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Movking Bird Tolerance Comes into Play Tolerance is a good virtue to own, without it there is no way to succeed. To Kill a Mockingbird is a great novel written by Harper Lee. In this book, a great deal of tolerance is shown by Atticus. His tolerance is shown especially in the town, when dealing with his kids and when talking to Aunt Alexandra. The theme of tolerance is shown by Atticus when he is in the town. Many of the town's people give Atticus a hard time because he is defending a black in court and he is white....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 770 words
(2.2 pages)
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Absolutely Different, Sadly Non-existent in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird - If the world was black and white, ninety-eight percent of the population would be gray. Leaving only a handful as black & white; which in this case, is a synonym for complete opposites. It just so happens that in Harper Lee’s only novel: To Kill a Mockingbird, there exist a pair of opposites. Yes, Attics Finch and Bob Ewell represent the extreme opposites of Maycomb’s society; from their contrasting viewpoints to their thoughtfulness (or lack of) resulting in their vastly different impressions. To begin with, being opposites, they hold the two different viewpoints held Maycomb’s society....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1167 words
(3.3 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird - Complexity - To Kill a Mockingbird - Complexity To Kill a Mockingbird exhibits many characters and their roles in the city of Maycomb. Among the many characters, are Jem Finch, brother of Jean Louise Finch daughter of Atticus, and Arthur Radley a relative of Nathan Radley. All of the characters in the book demonstrate one-dimensional and three-dimensional tendencies but Jem and Arthur are those that provide the greatest insight to the latter. Jem Finch is a three-dimensional character with symbols of success, virtue and an adverse personality in To Kill a Mockingbird....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 792 words
(2.3 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Prejudice has caused the pain and suffering of others for many centuries. Some examples of this include the Holocaust and slavery in the United States. In to Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee racism was the cause of much agony to the blacks of a segregated South. Along with blacks, other groups of people are judged unfairly just because of their difference from others. The prejudice and bigotry of society causes the victimization of people with differences. Some who are discriminated against are those who are born differently than the majority....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 747 words
(2.1 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Irony is the opposite of what is and what seems to be. Harper Lee uses irony in her novel To Kill A Mockingbird on several occasions to illustrate the difference between appearance versus reality. An example of this is the cementing of the tree. Jem and Scout received many gifts from the oak tree like: chewing gum, a ball of twine, soap carvings of Jem and Scout, a spelling medal, Indian-heads, and a pocket watch. Jem and Scout write the gift-giver a thank you note intending to put it in the tree hole the very next day....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 688 words
(2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - One of the major masterpieces of American literature, To Kill A Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee originally as a love story, was published in 1960 and won a Pulitzer Prize in 1961. It also won an Academy Award when it was later made into a film starring Gregory Peck. The story is set in imaginary Maycomb County in southern Alabama. The time frame for the story is the early 1930's during the great depression. Poverty was common and times were extremely tough. This book is loaded with interesting characters....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1000 words
(2.9 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee contain a very engaging family who are the Cunninghams. The Cunninghams are very poor; they are people who live in the woods. They are a family who depend highly on crops. Walter Cunningham, the 'father' of the family has to work hard on the cultivation of crops because crops is the only form of wages for them. The Cunninghams have no money. Their only way to survive is through paying others with their crops. The Cunninghams are not main characters in the book, but they are characters who 'brought out' other characters' personality....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 545 words
(1.6 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Throughout history, racism has played a major role in social relations. In Harper Lee's novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, this theme is presented to the reader and displays the shallowness of white people in the south during the depression. The assumption that Blacks were inferior is proved during the trial of Tom Robinson. Such characteristics served to justify the verdict of the trial. In this trial, Tom Robinson is accused of raping Mayella Ewell and is found guilty. Many examples from this novel support the fact that Tom Robinson was in fact innocent....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 571 words
(1.6 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essays: An Analysis - An Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird is a narrative written by Harper Lee. By definition T.K.A.M is a mediated presentation of a causally connected series of actions involving characters in conflict. Harper Lee uses mediation to create a theme that illustrates the injustices of prejudice, intolerance, and quick judgments of others. Harper Lee choose the setting as an imaginary (Maycomb) county in Alabama during the 1930's. She set the story during this time because it was a time of social turbulence , and a time when Americans began to start thinking about more modern social issues....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 941 words
(2.7 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mockingbird When Scout is six years old she meets Dill who is visiting his aunt there in Maycomb for the summer. Scout and her brother Jem play with Dill and try to figure out ways to catch a glimpse of their weird neighbor Boo Radley. Boo is mysterious to them because he always stays in the house and they have never seen him before. After the summer is over, school is about to start and Dill goes back home to Mississippi. This is Scouts first year of school and on her first day she gets into trouble with the teacher because she already knows how to read and write, and gets into a fight with Walter Cunningham....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 774 words
(2.2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - A summary: When Scout was six, Dill (Charles Baker Harris) comes to visit his aunt and becomes good friends with the Finches. The children in Maycomb spend all their free time of summer trying to get Boo (Arthur) Radley come out of his house. None of the children have ever seen the mysterious man that lives next door, but they never find out that he is actually shut up in this house. After the summer is over, Scout enters school and gets into trouble because she already knows how to read and to write....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1222 words
(3.5 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the town of Maycomb, Alabama. The story is told through the eyes of Jean Louise "Scout" Finch, who is the age of six in the beginning of the tale. She tells the story in sequential order for the period of three summers. Jean Louise ‘Scout’ Finch She narrates the story describing her life between the ages of six and nine.  She is a tomboy and well educated, mainly due to her father, and she has an optimistic view of the world and people around her....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 687 words
(2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - People have different perceptions of courage all the time; some think it is a man with a gun in hand; some see courage as mental strength to persevere and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty; others think courage is an ordinary person, doing extraordinary things; or even standing up for what is right, even if you are standing alone. In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, courage is illustrated through the characters of Atticus Finch, Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose, and Bob Ewell. Atticus and Mrs.Dubose share some of the same characteristics of courage....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 983 words
(2.8 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee In this chapter, a introduction of the Finch family is given by Scout (Jean Louise). Simon Finch established a homestead, ‘Finch’s Landing’, on the banks of the Alabama River. He died a rich man. One of his sons, Atticus, studied law, the other had studied medicine. Both sons left Finch’s Landing, but their sister Alexandria stayed Atticus lives with his two children Jem, and Scout, and the cook, and care taker of Scout, and Jem, Calpurnia. Atticus’ wife died when the children were young....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 4220 words
(12.1 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Would you rather read a boring novel that contains static characters or would you want to read one that takes you on a journey through a dynamic character's life. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Scout's personality greatly changes as she matures and learns more about life. This novel takes place in the 1930's in a typical southern society. Once Atticus chooses to defend Tom Robinson, a black man, Scout faces many challenges and she discovers numerous facts about life. Throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird Scout grows up and learns that one should not be prejudiced toward others, the true meaning of courage, and that it is wrong to harm the innocent and kind....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird] 1137 words
(3.2 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill A Mockingbird is an award-winning novel written by Harper Lee. The novel was published in 1960 and the movie was filmed in 1961. A six-year-old girl by the name of Scout is the main character and narrates the story line in the movie. The movie takes place in the small town of Maycomb, Alabama. Maycomb is portrayed as a small, sleepy, depression-era town during the 1930’s depression era. The plot of the movie revolves around the arrest and trial of an unjustly accused black man named Tom Robinson....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 795 words
(2.3 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird - Moral - To Kill A Mockingbird - Moral In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the author intends the reader to learn that you shouldn't judge people by there race. Later on I will be telling you about a life as the Cunningham's, Bob Ewell, and Atticus. So if you listen up and pay attention you will almost be as smart as me. The Cunninghams were the poor family they were so poor they couldn't afford shoes for the family and they also never had any food. "Walter Cunningham's face told everybody in the first grade he had hookworms....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 675 words
(1.9 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird In Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, there were many lessons that were taught. Atticus was a lawyer who taught his son Jem and daughter Scout many different values. Atticus felt that one of the most important values was to put yourself in someone else's shoes before you judge them. He also taught them to respect others. Scout was a wild girl and always got into fights with other guys; Atticus showed her that fighting doesn't solve anything. Atticus showed the kids that you should not judge other people....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 511 words
(1.5 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird The story of To Kill a Mockingbird takes place during the 1930s in a small town in Alabama in the southern United States - much like the town where the author Harper Lee herself grew up. To understand what the book is saying about racism, you need to know something of the history of race relations in the southern USA. Plot ---- The novel is about three years in the life of the Finch family: Atticus and his son Jem and daughter Scout....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 3859 words
(11 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Childhood is a continuous time of learning, and of seeing mistakes and using them to change your perspectives. In the book To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee illustrates how two children learn from people and their actions to respect everyone no matter what they might look like on the outside. To Kill A Mockingbird tells a story about two young kids named Scout and her older brother Jem Finch growing up in their small, racist town of Maycomb, Alabama. As the years go by they learn how their town and a lot of the people in it aren’t as perfect as they may have seemed before....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1141 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel written by Harper Lee. It was published in 1960 by J.B. Lippincott Company in Philadelphia & New York. This is the only book that Harper Lee has ever written. It is also one of the best-loved novels in American literature, winning the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Lee is a very private person who doesn’t grant interviews, although her literary agent says she divides her time between her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama and New York. She also enjoys reading, and her favorite authors are Jane Austen, Charles Lamb, and Robert Louis Stevenson....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 761 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird During the 1930s, during the time when the novel was set, society was very different to what it is now. "To Kill a Mockingbird" is Harper Lee's story about life in a small town in Southern America during the 1930s. The story is based in the state of Texas, Alabama, in this state slavery was very common and because of this it became to be known as the "Slave State". The story involves "Atticus Finch" a lawyer who must defend an African American who has been wrongly accused of raping a Caucasian woman....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2470 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird - Boo - To Kill A Mockingbird - Boo Early in the story Boo was just the subject of talk and myths but we learn more about him soon after. Boo is the nickname of Arthur Radley. Early in the book Boo is described as a tall and scary looking person who runs around at night eating live possums and cats. He was sometime known as a phantom because no one knew who he was and he goes out at night and eat cats or any other living animal. Boo got into trouble with the law when he resisted arrest and was locked up the ancient beadle, Mr Conner, in the court outhouse....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 631 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird - Equality - To Kill a Mockingbird - Equality Few people are the same as they are on the street in their homes. Few people can treat others equally; no matter what colour their skin is. Atticus Finch is one of those precious few. Racism in the town of Maycomb is nothing but disguised by the polite smiles and ladies missionary meetings; although it is the strongest belief that each person of the town holds apart from some such as Atticus. Racism is an issue of great importance, yet to the eye of a visitor waltzing through, it's just a slight whisk of air....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 618 words
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Courage in To Kill A Mockingbird - Courage ?Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak, Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen. Courage is the thing which can be found in a child to an old man. It needs a lot of courage to take out courage from the heart. It is like a brain. It depends on the person, how and when he uses it. This tiny word has the power to convey the whole gesture of a person. According to Harper Lee?s genius ?To Kill a Mockingbird?, Courage is when you know you are licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through it through no matter what....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 544 words
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The Mockingbirds of To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Certain uncanny resemblance's between Tom Robinson and Boo Radley's lives exist in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. In this novel, Boo Radley and Tom Robinson both symbolize the mockingbird. A mockingbird is a harmless bird that makes the world more pleasant with it's song. Both Boo and Tom were peaceful people who never did any harm. The first parallel in the lives of Tom and Boo focuses on their property. Tom lives in the 'nigger nest'; (175) near Mr. Ewell but outside of the city limits. A person's status often relates to his property, and the interpretation of that property's value is often based on the tenants of the land....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 469 words
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The Reality of To Kill A Mockingbird - The Reality of To Kill A Mockingbird The novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, takes place during a racially intense time in history. Harper Lee’s novel was intended to bring a harsh sense of reality to the real world, and demonstrate how it really was during this time in history. This novel is set in Maycomb, Alabama, somewhere during the time period of 1925-1935. Times were hard for the citizens of Maycomb during this period, because of the depression. There are many fictional events in this novel related to non-fictional racial events in history....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays]
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee “You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?” (Lee 197) A quote from Harper Lee’s award winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird, which says so much. It shows the prejudice present in the 1920’s and 1930’s and how a black man could not feel sorry for a white woman because he was black. Negroes were not treated as equals. In fact, Negroes were believed to be less than second-class citizens, even level with the animals on the social ladder and biologically inferior to whites....   [tags: Racism Race Kill Mockingbird Essays] 1560 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is a highly regarded work of American fiction. The story of the novel teaches us many lessons that should last any reader for a lifetime. The messages that Harper Lee relays to the reader are exemplified throughout the book using various methods. One of the most important and significant methods was the use of symbols such as the mockingbird image. Another important method was showing the view through a growing child's (Scout Finch) mind, eyes, ears, and mouth....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 1401 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird The United States has been dealing with the issue of racism ever since Columbus landed on Plymouth Rock. The Indians were the first to endure harsh racism in this country. Pilgrims moving west ran them off their land wiping out many tribes and destroying many resources in their path. However, when many think of racism today, the issue of blacks and whites is the first to come to mind. African Americans have come a long way in today’s society as compared to the society their ancestors had to overcome....   [tags: Racism Race Kill Mockingbird Essays]
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Summary of To Kill a Mockingbird - Summary of To Kill a Mockingbird Mayella testifies next, a reasonably clean nineteen-year- old girl who is obviously terrified. She says that she called Tom Robinson inside the fence that evening and offered him a nickel to break up a dresser for her, and that once he got inside the house he grabbed her and took advantage of her. In Atticus' cross-examination, Mayella reveals that she has seven siblings to care for, a drunken father, and no friends. Then Atticus examines her testimony and asks why she didn't put up a better fight, why her screams didn't bring the other children running, and--most importantly--how Tom Robinson managed the crime with a useless left hand, torn apart by a cotto...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee Essays] 4095 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird "To Kill a Mocking Bird" by Harper Lee was published in 1960 and was adapted into a play by Christopher Sergal and published in 1980. It tells the story of a court case when a black man gets accused of raping a white woman. The black man, Tom Robinson is defended by the a lawyer called Atticus Finch. Atticus is one of the few people in Maycome who have a bit of money an can read and write very well. The inevitable outcome of the case was that the Black man was sentenced to death....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 2334 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird In the early twentieth century, the United States was undergoing a dramatic social change. Slavery had been abolished decades before, but the southern states were still attempting to restrict social interaction among people of different races. In particular, blacks were subject to special Jim Crow laws which restricted their rights and attempted to keep the race inferior to whites. Even beyond these laws, however, blacks were feeling the pressure of prejudice....   [tags: Racism Race Kill Mockingbird Essays]
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Atticus Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The state of Alabama in the 1930's was a place filled with racial discrimination and poverty. Atticus Finch was a lawyer of that time. He has two children and a hired house worker. Atticus believes that racial discrimination is wrong and tries to treat every individual equally in reference to his parenting skills. He also tries to alter the distorted perception of the community. Although he is a positive role model for his children, ho too has his strengths and weaknesses. In Maycomb, Atticus Finch is a strong figure who firmly believes in equal rights for all men and women....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1027 words
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Misconceptions about Human Behavior in To Kill a Mockingbird - How do we define normal human behavior. In order to determine the answer we must first determine what behavior really is, the conclusion is easy enough to reach: Human behavior derives from reactions to internal or external stimuli (Salvador); these reactions bring about emotions that dictate a particular response or behavior. These become part of a person’s personality, which defines their behavior, due to this, a person’s behavior is able to adapt to the stimuli with their environment and thus the definition of “normal behavior” is in a state of constant flux....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 629 words
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The Impact of Prejudice in Harper Lee's Novel, To Kill a Mockingbird - The Impact of Prejudice in Harper Lee's Novel, To Kill a Mockingbird The prejudice seen in the fictional novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee corresponds with the real narrow-mindedness during this time period. A fair trial would be unlikely during this time period between a white and a black man. Tom Robinson was presumed guilty because of his race. Prejudice is “an adverse opinion or leaning formed without just grounds or before sufficient knowledge” (Merriam); according to Lystra Moore Richardson of Yale University: “prejudice… was part of the very fiber of Southern life [during the Great Depression].” With these two pieces of information, it is derived that people formed judgment...   [tags: Kill Mockingbird]
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Scout's Childhood Simplicity in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird - The adult world is a cold and terrifying place. There are robberies, shootings, murders, suicides, and much more. If you were to be a small child, perhaps age 5, and you were to look in at this world, you would never know how bad it actually was, just from a single glance. Children have a small slice of ignorant bliss, which helps to keep them away from the harsh of reality. It isn’t until later, when they encounter something that opens their eyes and shows them, that they truly start to understand the world we live it....   [tags: Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird, childhood,] 634 words
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The Title of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The Title of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee In the novel 'to kill a mockingbird' Harper lee uses a metaphorical mockingbird to symbolise the different characters and actions within her book and to symbolise why people get the treatment they do and how they don't deserve it. The reader begins to understand the meaning of the title of the book through the personified mockingbird being used numerous times throughout the novel. The use of the Mockingbird is used throughout the novel but is 1st mentioned when Atticus is telling his children how to use their shotguns but tells them 'it's a sin to kill a Mockingbird' this statement from Atticus is used as the moral...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1001 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay: Parallels and Differences - To Kill a Mockingbird: Parallels and Differences Jill McCorkle's Ferris Beach, a contemporary novel, shares numerous characteristics with Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, a novel written in the 1960's. Like To Kill a Mockingbird, McCorkle's novel documents the life of a young girl in a small southern town. The two narrators, Kate Burns and Scout Finch, endure difficult encounters. A study of these main characters reveals the parallels and differences of the two novels. Jill McCorkle duplicates character similarities and rape from Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird to show the reader how young girls think and develop....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1759 words
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Why is the Novel Called To Kill a Mockingbird? - Why is the Novel called To Kill a Mockingbird. In order for us to understand the reason why the novel is called "To Kill a Mockingbird", we need to take into account what the title actually means. The mockingbird is a type of finch, and it gets its name from its ability to make sounds that mimic other animals. This bird is not a predator and all it does is to make music. In the book the references made to the mockingbird are ones of great significance. The first time we come across this in the novel is when Atticus Finch says to his son Jem Finch, "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." The children, Jem and his sister Scout do no...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2049 words
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The Message of Moral Responsibility in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Message of Moral Responsibility in To Kill a Mockingbird Not only is To Kill a Mockingbird a fun novel to read, it is purposeful. Harper Lee wrote the novel to demonstrate the way in which the world and its people should live together in harmony through a basic moral attitude of treating others with respect and kindness. The novel received the Pulitzer Prize in 1960, which places it among the best adult novels ever written; although it achieved this high recognition, today’s primary readers are adolescents....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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Injustices In To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Injustices There have been many famous pieces of literature, but one that stands out is the 1960's classic To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee. Lee, who only wrote one book in her life time, wrote of prejudice, injustice, and racism in the 1930's. To Kill a Mockingbird takes place in the Deep South in the 1930's. To Kill a Mockingbird is a story in which a black mad is accused of doing something he didn't do. During the whole story some of the two of the main characters, Jem Finch and Jean Lousie Finch, grow up in there mind but, are still of young age....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1174 words
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Character Study of Jem in To Kill a Mockingbird - In To Kill a Mockingbird Jem is Scout's older brother who acts as a protector and mentor when their father, Atticus, is not present. (Scout is the main character) Both of the children are moulded and shaped by their father Atticus, Jem more so than Scout, but this is probably down to his age, Atticus brings the children up to stand by their beliefs but to accept the beliefs and views of others, and to take a look at the way another person would see the situation. The teachings of Atticus have a profound impact on Jem....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1784 words
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The Crucial Role of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Crucial Role of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird       In To Kill a Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee, themes and central ideas of the novel are emphasized by subtle symbols. Symbols shown throughout the novel not only represent concrete objects but also ideas, feelings, beliefs, and attitudes of the characters. Some symbols even represent more than one thing. Lee's recurring use of symbols contribute to the underlying themes and ideas of the novel. Lee's unusual title is a symbol itself and it keeps the reader in anticipation while waiting for a mockingbird to enter the story....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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Boundaries in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Boundaries in To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird revolves around human behavior and the boundaries that it facilitates. The boundaries of the quiet little town of Maycomb, Alabama are constantly tested by the games that people play. In each game, distinctions evolve. The distinctions become the rules of the game, of life, and from them, different boundaries form for each new character. With each new drama, characters and distinctions change, as do the boundaries which form them. The "summertime boundary" introduces the first instance of boundaries....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1017 words
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Free Essays - Evil in To Kill A Mockingbird - Evil in To Kill A Mockingbird "Our greatest evils flow from ourselves" (Tripp 192). This statement, by Rousseau, epitomizes many points of evil that are discussed in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. In our world today, we are stared in the face everyday with many facets of evil. These nefarious things come in several forms, including, but not limited to discrimination of sex, race, ethnicity, physical appearance, and popularity, alcoholism, drug abuse, irresponsibility, and even murder....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 934 words
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Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - In the 1960’s Harper Lee wrote the award-winning novel ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’. The novels story is told through the eyes of Jean Louise Finch (aka. Scout). It all starts when Scout is only six years of age. She lives with her Father Atticus (Lawyer), Brother Jeremy (Jem), and their lovely black Housekeeper, Calpurnia. They live in the Deep South in a small town called Maycomb. Scout and Jem make a new friend early on in the book, Dill, with whom they get into much mischief with. They soon come to realize that in their little racial town, there is more to it than meets eye....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1270 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird The Maturing of Jem Finch - To Kill A Mockingbird              The Maturing of Jem Finch     Society is not as innocent to a child as it may appear to be. In fact, when one really understands the society in which he lives he is no longer a child. This is much the same case as found in To Kill A Mockingbird, by Leigh Harper. Although Jem, being a child at the beginning of the novel, is immature and unaware of the society in which he lives, he matures mentally to the point where he sees the evil in society and gains a knowledge of death....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1029 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Answers - To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee Question : On giving Jem and Scout air rifles, Atticus tells them that to kill a mockingbird is a sin. Miss Maudie explains that mockingbirds only do one thing, and that is to sing their hearts out for us. Who are the mockingbirds in the story, and how have they been ‘killed’ by the society around them. Ideas : The two main mockingbirds are Boo Radley and Tom Robinson, but there are others within the storyline. Boo Radley has been shut away from the world by his father and then later his brother through an incident which occurred fifteen years earlier when he stabbed his father with a pair of scissors....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1294 words
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Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Harper Lee has used symbolism rather extensively throughout the novel and a great deal of it refers to the problems of racism in the South during the early twentieth century. Symbolism can be traced in almost every important episode or event which formulates the story line. Right from the beginning Scout's character and her outlook towards the behavior of the people in Maycomb county symbolizes a child's innate curiosity towards life....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 720 words
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Parent and Sibling Relationships in To Kill A Mockingbird - Parent and Sibling Relationships in To Kill A Mockingbird Inside the wondrous book, To Kill a Mockingbird, you can find many different examples of the theme I chose for this particular essay. The theme I seemed most fascinated with was parent and sibling relationships. The reason why I chose this theme was for the reason that I knew this book was all about the lessons that we learn in life, and how we gain knowledge from our parents and other family members also. As I looked through the book I found dozens of examples of parent and sibling relationships....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 818 words
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Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird   Prejudice is a strong word.  In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, a black man, Tom Robinson, was accused of raping a white woman, Mayella Ewell, and was brought to trial.  There were distinct views concerning Tom Robinson's innocence – views influenced by prejudice. The townspeople of Maycomb believed in Tom's guilt while Atticus and the children believed in Tom's innocence.       The townspeople, from day one, knew what the verdict was going to be even though some of them knew deep down that Tom did not rape Mayella....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 743 words
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