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Your search returned 200 essays for "to kill a mockingbird":
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To Kill a Mockingbird - The author Nelle Harper Lee was born in1926 in the small southwestern Alabama town of Monroeville. She is the youngest of four children of Amasa Coleman Lee and Frances Finch Lee. Harper Lee attended Huntingdon College 1944-45, studied law at University of Alabama 1945-49, and studied one year at Oxford University. In the 1950s she worked as a reservation clerk with Eastern Air Lines in New York City. In order to concentrate on writing Harper Lee gave up her position and moved into a cold-water apartment with makeshift furniture....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2533 words
(7.2 pages)
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Use of the Mockingbird Motif in To Kill a Mockingbird - How Harper Lee uses the Mockingbird motif "To Kill A Mockingbird" has a main theme of prejudice and the persecution of innocent and harmless individuals. The main themes of this book very much link in with the title, which is explained by Harper Lee through Atticus and Miss Maudie (pg 96.) Miss Maudie explains - "Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don't one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird. This is the first obvious reference to the title of the book and the mockingbird motif....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1249 words
(3.6 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird - In the widely known novel To Kill A Mockingbird there are two families that are very diverse and are text book examples of complete opposites on the moral ladder of success. The Cunninghams and the Ewells have two very distinct and opposite reputations. The Cunninghams which are very respected while the Ewells very much despised. The Ewells are given the privilege to hunt out of season, so that the residents of the small town of Maycomb would not have to tolerate their continuous begging twenty-four hours a day for seven days a week....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1041 words
(3 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In the last century, there have certainly been many "greats" - novels, books and stories that impress, amaze and make one think. Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird", however, is unique among all these poignant pieces of literature in that the novel solely develops Lee's idea, brought out by Atticus in the novel, to "...shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird" (90). This phrase is expounded by the character Miss Maudie when she says "...mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1325 words
(3.8 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - At the beginning of the novel, Scout is an innocent, good-hearted five-year-old child who has no experience with the evils of the world. As the novel progresses, Scout has her first contact with evil in the form of racial prejudice, and the basic development of her character is governed by the question of whether she will emerge from that contact with her conscience and optimism intact or whether she will be bruised, hurt, or destroyed like Boo Radley and Tom Robinson. Thanks to Atticus's wisdom, Scout learns that though humanity has a great capacity for evil, it also has a great capacity for good, and that the evil can often be mitigated if one approaches others with an outlook of sympathy...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2644 words
(7.6 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Sometimes the very most unexpected events that happen in people’s lives are during their childhood and it impacts them for the rest of their lives. The emotion of the event stays with them forever, and it affects them In the future. The emotion by our childhood sometimes gets in our way of making our choices. in the book To Kill a Mockingbird, Helen Keller tells us a story about a five year old girl named Scout dealing with problems during her childhood and how the events that happen to her make her understand what problems that she may have in the future....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
876 words
(2.5 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The book, To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is a timeless classic about the coming of age of a small southern town and it’s people. The book follows Jem and Scout, two siblings living in the 1930’s in a small southern town. Their father, Atticus, is a lawyer who is hired to defend a black man who is accused of rape. The children watch the town and the trial change and grow. Atticus loses the trial and Tom Robinson, the man who is being accused of rape gets killed by prison guards. The whole town is in an uproar....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 719 words
(2.1 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird and American History - To Kill a Mockingbird and American History The book, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, has many different relations to American history. The book shows good examples of racism, working life, church, and many other things. The book takes place sometime in the 1930's. It's about two children named Jem and Scout. They are very imaginative kids always making up new games and other things to pass the time. In the beginning of the book they are obsessed with one of their neighbors, Boo Radley. They think that Boo is a crazy man that killed his parents....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 522 words
(1.5 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Would you rather read a boring novel that contains static characters or would you want to read one that takes you on a journey through a dynamic character's life. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Scout's personality greatly changes as she matures and learns more about life. This novel takes place in the 1930's in a typical southern society. Once Atticus chooses to defend Tom Robinson, a black man, Scout faces many challenges and she discovers numerous facts about life. Throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird Scout grows up and learns that one should not be prejudiced toward others, the true meaning of courage, and that it is wrong to harm the innocent and kind....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird] 1137 words
(3.2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird Comparison and Contrast of the Characters of Bob Ewell and Atticus Finch In this essay I will introduce you to the two main characters in Harper Lee's book "To kill a mockingbird", comparing them in their attitudes and actions. Atticus Finch is a single father raising two children in the small town of Maycomb, Alabama. Atticus works as a lawyer believing in equal justice for all Americans regardless of race or religion. Bob Ewell is also a single father raising eight children who also lives in Maycomb....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 657 words
(1.9 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mockingbird In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, a character Atticus states; “Courage is when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.” Throughout history, there have been many courageous people who have strongly demonstrated the quality of courage. Courage is a reoccurring theme that Harper Lee chooses to emphasize throughout To Kill A Mockingbird that many of her characters pursue as a strong quality. However, courage is proven to be most evident through Atticus, Scout, and Calpurina....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1280 words
(3.7 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird by Horton Foote To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel set over sixty years ago in a foreign country, yet it has always been both popular and respected. Consider why the novel is still relevant to readers in 2015. Refer closely to events and characters in the text. ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ shows that even in the democratic society of the United States, there was discrimination and prejudice in the nineteen-thirties. Although this has been reduced there, in many other countries and regions these conditions still exist for minority groups....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1130 words
(3.2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - to kill a mockingbird To Kill A Mockingbird To Kill A Mockingbird is a great book written by Harper Lee. This book is about Tom Robinson trying to help a white girl named Mayella. All that Tom was trying to do was help that little white girl out, but he was alone with her. Bob Ewell Mayella's father said that Tom raped his daughter Mayella. He was just walking by and got asked to help a girl out so he did because he felt sorry for her. Those were three things leading to Tom Robinson's conviction....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 3884 words
(11.1 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird, is a story about a trial in a small Alabama town, where a black man is accused of raping a white woman. In this essay I will share with you the setting, some of the characters, some incidents from the plot, the theme, and the point of view. To Kill a Mockingbird is set in Maycomb County, Alabama, in the early 1930's. The setting plays an enormous role in this story. Many of the events that take place in this book may not have taken place if the setting were different. For instance, if this book were set in New York City in 1999 the outcome of the trial may have been totally different....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 467 words
(1.3 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird - Moral - To Kill A Mockingbird - Moral In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the author intends the reader to learn that you shouldn't judge people by there race. Later on I will be telling you about a life as the Cunningham's, Bob Ewell, and Atticus. So if you listen up and pay attention you will almost be as smart as me. The Cunninghams were the poor family they were so poor they couldn't afford shoes for the family and they also never had any food. "Walter Cunningham's face told everybody in the first grade he had hookworms....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 675 words
(1.9 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird In Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, there were many lessons that were taught. Atticus was a lawyer who taught his son Jem and daughter Scout many different values. Atticus felt that one of the most important values was to put yourself in someone else's shoes before you judge them. He also taught them to respect others. Scout was a wild girl and always got into fights with other guys; Atticus showed her that fighting doesn't solve anything. Atticus showed the kids that you should not judge other people....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 511 words
(1.5 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In To Kill a Mockingbird, we are told the story of the lives of the Finch family through the eyes of one Jean Louise “Scout” Finch. She is around the age of eight years old, so she is very young. Essentially, she has always wanted to go to school, but when she gets there, she finds that her education level surpasses that of the first grade. Her father forces her to stay in school. That summer she meets a peculiar person who calls himself Dill, although his name is Charles Baker Harris. Scout and her brother, Jem, quickly befriend him....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 862 words
(2.5 pages)
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Compassion and Tolerance in To Kill A Mockingbird - Do you not believe we need more compassion and tolerance in the world. Why can we not be like Atticus, Jem or Scout from To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. These characters show great compassion and tolerance throughout the novel despite the society they live in. They have the courage to stand up for what they believe in. Atticus shows great compassion and tolerance when he stands up for the Negroes. He stands up and represents Tom Robinson because he believes that everyone should be treated equally in the court of law....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
629 words
(1.8 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - “A man of courage flees towards the start of indifferent things.” In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee there are many dissimilar examples of courageous behavior. There are many different definitions of courage. Some people say that courage is being able to face their fears. Others say that courage is a person with a tough heart. In the novel, Lee describes courage as being “when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what" (p.112)....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 561 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Ewell Residence in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Ewell Residence in To Kill a Mockingbird In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee gives us a very detailed description of Robert Ewell, his family, and how he lives. A good example is the passage in which Robert Ewell testifies in the Tom Robinson Trial. This is a description of the Ewell's home as well as an insight into the Ewells themselves. We learn what kind of a father Robert is and the kind of life into which he has forced his eldest daughter, Mayella. We also see how the county of Maycomb cruelly discriminates against the black community even though they are more respectable than people like the Ewells....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1068 words
(3.1 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mockingbird By: Harper Lee SUMMARY To Kill a Mockingbird opens with Dill coming to visit his Aunt for the summer. Dill becomes a good friend with the Finches, Jean-Louise, who is nicknamed Scout and her brother, Jeremy Finch, who is nicknamed Jem. They live with their father, Atticus, who is a lawyer who had been given a case to handle and did not have any choice but to receive it and work his best for his client. The case was about an African man, named Tom Robinson, who was accused of raping a white woman....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1585 words
(4.5 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Movking Bird Tolerance Comes into Play Tolerance is a good virtue to own, without it there is no way to succeed. To Kill a Mockingbird is a great novel written by Harper Lee. In this book, a great deal of tolerance is shown by Atticus. His tolerance is shown especially in the town, when dealing with his kids and when talking to Aunt Alexandra. The theme of tolerance is shown by Atticus when he is in the town. Many of the town's people give Atticus a hard time because he is defending a black in court and he is white....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 770 words
(2.2 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Childhood is a continuous time of learning, and of seeing mistakes and using them to change your perspectives. In the book To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee illustrates how two children learn from people and their actions to respect everyone no matter what they might look like on the outside. To Kill A Mockingbird tells a story about two young kids named Scout and her older brother Jem Finch growing up in their small, racist town of Maycomb, Alabama. As the years go by they learn how their town and a lot of the people in it aren’t as perfect as they may have seemed before....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1141 words
(3.3 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel written by Harper Lee. It was published in 1960 by J.B. Lippincott Company in Philadelphia & New York. This is the only book that Harper Lee has ever written. It is also one of the best-loved novels in American literature, winning the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Lee is a very private person who doesn’t grant interviews, although her literary agent says she divides her time between her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama and New York. She also enjoys reading, and her favorite authors are Jane Austen, Charles Lamb, and Robert Louis Stevenson....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 761 words
(2.2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Irony is the opposite of what is and what seems to be. Harper Lee uses irony in her novel To Kill A Mockingbird on several occasions to illustrate the difference between appearance versus reality. An example of this is the cementing of the tree. Jem and Scout received many gifts from the oak tree like: chewing gum, a ball of twine, soap carvings of Jem and Scout, a spelling medal, Indian-heads, and a pocket watch. Jem and Scout write the gift-giver a thank you note intending to put it in the tree hole the very next day....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 688 words
(2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - One of the major masterpieces of American literature, To Kill A Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee originally as a love story, was published in 1960 and won a Pulitzer Prize in 1961. It also won an Academy Award when it was later made into a film starring Gregory Peck. The story is set in imaginary Maycomb County in southern Alabama. The time frame for the story is the early 1930's during the great depression. Poverty was common and times were extremely tough. This book is loaded with interesting characters....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1000 words
(2.9 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird - Boo - To Kill A Mockingbird - Boo Early in the story Boo was just the subject of talk and myths but we learn more about him soon after. Boo is the nickname of Arthur Radley. Early in the book Boo is described as a tall and scary looking person who runs around at night eating live possums and cats. He was sometime known as a phantom because no one knew who he was and he goes out at night and eat cats or any other living animal. Boo got into trouble with the law when he resisted arrest and was locked up the ancient beadle, Mr Conner, in the court outhouse....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 631 words
(1.8 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird - Equality - To Kill a Mockingbird - Equality Few people are the same as they are on the street in their homes. Few people can treat others equally; no matter what colour their skin is. Atticus Finch is one of those precious few. Racism in the town of Maycomb is nothing but disguised by the polite smiles and ladies missionary meetings; although it is the strongest belief that each person of the town holds apart from some such as Atticus. Racism is an issue of great importance, yet to the eye of a visitor waltzing through, it's just a slight whisk of air....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 618 words
(1.8 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee contain a very engaging family who are the Cunninghams. The Cunninghams are very poor; they are people who live in the woods. They are a family who depend highly on crops. Walter Cunningham, the 'father' of the family has to work hard on the cultivation of crops because crops is the only form of wages for them. The Cunninghams have no money. Their only way to survive is through paying others with their crops. The Cunninghams are not main characters in the book, but they are characters who 'brought out' other characters' personality....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 545 words
(1.6 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Throughout history, racism has played a major role in social relations. In Harper Lee's novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, this theme is presented to the reader and displays the shallowness of white people in the south during the depression. The assumption that Blacks were inferior is proved during the trial of Tom Robinson. Such characteristics served to justify the verdict of the trial. In this trial, Tom Robinson is accused of raping Mayella Ewell and is found guilty. Many examples from this novel support the fact that Tom Robinson was in fact innocent....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 571 words
(1.6 pages)
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Courage in To Kill A Mockingbird - Courage ?Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak, Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen. Courage is the thing which can be found in a child to an old man. It needs a lot of courage to take out courage from the heart. It is like a brain. It depends on the person, how and when he uses it. This tiny word has the power to convey the whole gesture of a person. According to Harper Lee?s genius ?To Kill a Mockingbird?, Courage is when you know you are licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through it through no matter what....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 544 words
(1.6 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essays: An Analysis - An Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird is a narrative written by Harper Lee. By definition T.K.A.M is a mediated presentation of a causally connected series of actions involving characters in conflict. Harper Lee uses mediation to create a theme that illustrates the injustices of prejudice, intolerance, and quick judgments of others. Harper Lee choose the setting as an imaginary (Maycomb) county in Alabama during the 1930's. She set the story during this time because it was a time of social turbulence , and a time when Americans began to start thinking about more modern social issues....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 941 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Theme of Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird -   The theme of prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird is much more than just a case of black and white. The entire novel is about prejudice in its' many forms, the most prominent case of prejudice is the hate between the blacks and whites. The whole town of Maycomb is based on stereotypes of it's inhabitants, that are passed down from generation to generation. Rumors run rampid and very little truth is usually in them.       "So Jem received most of his information from Miss Stephanie Crawford,      a neighbor scold, she said she knew the whole thing....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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1377 words
(3.9 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird - The Character of Dill - To Kill A Mockingbird - The Character of Dill From their first impression of Dill Scout and Jem feel that, Charles Baker Harris is a small, weedy, but oddly curious child whose name was "longer'n you are". At the initial meeting he was wearing "blue linen shorts that buttoned to his shirt, his hair was snow white and stuck to his head like duck fluff". Even though he seemed odd to Jem and Scout when he spoke of going to the cinema and seeing films like Dracula he automatically had their attention and respect....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 962 words
(2.7 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mockingbird When Scout is six years old she meets Dill who is visiting his aunt there in Maycomb for the summer. Scout and her brother Jem play with Dill and try to figure out ways to catch a glimpse of their weird neighbor Boo Radley. Boo is mysterious to them because he always stays in the house and they have never seen him before. After the summer is over, school is about to start and Dill goes back home to Mississippi. This is Scouts first year of school and on her first day she gets into trouble with the teacher because she already knows how to read and write, and gets into a fight with Walter Cunningham....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 774 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - A summary: When Scout was six, Dill (Charles Baker Harris) comes to visit his aunt and becomes good friends with the Finches. The children in Maycomb spend all their free time of summer trying to get Boo (Arthur) Radley come out of his house. None of the children have ever seen the mysterious man that lives next door, but they never find out that he is actually shut up in this house. After the summer is over, Scout enters school and gets into trouble because she already knows how to read and to write....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1222 words
(3.5 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the town of Maycomb, Alabama. The story is told through the eyes of Jean Louise "Scout" Finch, who is the age of six in the beginning of the tale. She tells the story in sequential order for the period of three summers. Jean Louise ‘Scout’ Finch She narrates the story describing her life between the ages of six and nine.  She is a tomboy and well educated, mainly due to her father, and she has an optimistic view of the world and people around her....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 687 words
(2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - People have different perceptions of courage all the time; some think it is a man with a gun in hand; some see courage as mental strength to persevere and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty; others think courage is an ordinary person, doing extraordinary things; or even standing up for what is right, even if you are standing alone. In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, courage is illustrated through the characters of Atticus Finch, Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose, and Bob Ewell. Atticus and Mrs.Dubose share some of the same characteristics of courage....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 983 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the main characters: Atticus, Scout and Jem were faced with many losing battles such as Tom Robinson's case, the "mad dog incident" and Mrs. Dubose's addiction to morphine. This builds on the theme of there are things in life that won't go your way. The book takes place in the 1930's or 1940's in a small town in Alabama called Maycomb. The novel takes us through the life and perils that the main characters undergo and teach us about growing up and being mature....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1481 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Mockingbirds of To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Certain uncanny resemblance's between Tom Robinson and Boo Radley's lives exist in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. In this novel, Boo Radley and Tom Robinson both symbolize the mockingbird. A mockingbird is a harmless bird that makes the world more pleasant with it's song. Both Boo and Tom were peaceful people who never did any harm. The first parallel in the lives of Tom and Boo focuses on their property. Tom lives in the 'nigger nest'; (175) near Mr. Ewell but outside of the city limits. A person's status often relates to his property, and the interpretation of that property's value is often based on the tenants of the land....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 469 words
(1.3 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is a highly regarded work of American fiction. The story of the novel teaches us many lessons that should last any reader for a lifetime. The messages that Harper Lee relays to the reader are exemplified throughout the book using various methods. One of the most important and significant methods was the use of symbols such as the mockingbird image. Another important method was showing the view through a growing child's (Scout Finch) mind, eyes, ears, and mouth....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 1401 words
(4 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee “You felt sorry for her, you felt sorry for her?” (Lee 197) A quote from Harper Lee’s award winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird, which says so much. It shows the prejudice present in the 1920’s and 1930’s and how a black man could not feel sorry for a white woman because he was black. Negroes were not treated as equals. In fact, Negroes were believed to be less than second-class citizens, even level with the animals on the social ladder and biologically inferior to whites....   [tags: Racism Race Kill Mockingbird Essays] 1560 words
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The Message of Moral Responsibility in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Message of Moral Responsibility in To Kill a Mockingbird Not only is To Kill a Mockingbird a fun novel to read, it is purposeful. Harper Lee wrote the novel to demonstrate the way in which the world and its people should live together in harmony through a basic moral attitude of treating others with respect and kindness. The novel received the Pulitzer Prize in 1960, which places it among the best adult novels ever written; although it achieved this high recognition, today’s primary readers are adolescents....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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1555 words
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Injustices In To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Injustices There have been many famous pieces of literature, but one that stands out is the 1960's classic To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee. Lee, who only wrote one book in her life time, wrote of prejudice, injustice, and racism in the 1930's. To Kill a Mockingbird takes place in the Deep South in the 1930's. To Kill a Mockingbird is a story in which a black mad is accused of doing something he didn't do. During the whole story some of the two of the main characters, Jem Finch and Jean Lousie Finch, grow up in there mind but, are still of young age....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1174 words
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Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - A symbol is a word or expression which signifies something other than the physical object to which it directly refers. The book “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee contains three recognizable symbols. “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” (103) This could possibly be a symbol for Tom Robinson. He was innocent, yet sentenced to death because of his ethnicity....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 509 words
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Character Study of Jem in To Kill a Mockingbird - In To Kill a Mockingbird Jem is Scout's older brother who acts as a protector and mentor when their father, Atticus, is not present. (Scout is the main character) Both of the children are moulded and shaped by their father Atticus, Jem more so than Scout, but this is probably down to his age, Atticus brings the children up to stand by their beliefs but to accept the beliefs and views of others, and to take a look at the way another person would see the situation. The teachings of Atticus have a profound impact on Jem....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1784 words
(5.1 pages)
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Boundaries in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Boundaries in To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird revolves around human behavior and the boundaries that it facilitates. The boundaries of the quiet little town of Maycomb, Alabama are constantly tested by the games that people play. In each game, distinctions evolve. The distinctions become the rules of the game, of life, and from them, different boundaries form for each new character. With each new drama, characters and distinctions change, as do the boundaries which form them. The "summertime boundary" introduces the first instance of boundaries....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1017 words
(2.9 pages)
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Free Essays - Evil in To Kill A Mockingbird - Evil in To Kill A Mockingbird "Our greatest evils flow from ourselves" (Tripp 192). This statement, by Rousseau, epitomizes many points of evil that are discussed in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. In our world today, we are stared in the face everyday with many facets of evil. These nefarious things come in several forms, including, but not limited to discrimination of sex, race, ethnicity, physical appearance, and popularity, alcoholism, drug abuse, irresponsibility, and even murder....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 934 words
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Analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - In the 1960’s Harper Lee wrote the award-winning novel ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’. The novels story is told through the eyes of Jean Louise Finch (aka. Scout). It all starts when Scout is only six years of age. She lives with her Father Atticus (Lawyer), Brother Jeremy (Jem), and their lovely black Housekeeper, Calpurnia. They live in the Deep South in a small town called Maycomb. Scout and Jem make a new friend early on in the book, Dill, with whom they get into much mischief with. They soon come to realize that in their little racial town, there is more to it than meets eye....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1270 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Answers - To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee Question : On giving Jem and Scout air rifles, Atticus tells them that to kill a mockingbird is a sin. Miss Maudie explains that mockingbirds only do one thing, and that is to sing their hearts out for us. Who are the mockingbirds in the story, and how have they been ‘killed’ by the society around them. Ideas : The two main mockingbirds are Boo Radley and Tom Robinson, but there are others within the storyline. Boo Radley has been shut away from the world by his father and then later his brother through an incident which occurred fifteen years earlier when he stabbed his father with a pair of scissors....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1294 words
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Parent and Sibling Relationships in To Kill A Mockingbird - Parent and Sibling Relationships in To Kill A Mockingbird Inside the wondrous book, To Kill a Mockingbird, you can find many different examples of the theme I chose for this particular essay. The theme I seemed most fascinated with was parent and sibling relationships. The reason why I chose this theme was for the reason that I knew this book was all about the lessons that we learn in life, and how we gain knowledge from our parents and other family members also. As I looked through the book I found dozens of examples of parent and sibling relationships....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 818 words
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Themes In Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, may appear to be a simple story about childhood and life in a Southern town, but upon close examination it is a complex novel dealing with themes of education, moral courage, and tolerance. Through the eyes of Scout Finch, the young protagonist, novelist Harper Lee educates the reader about the importance of a moral education, as opposed to a formal education, the difference between traditional bravery and moral courage, and prejudice vs. tolerance. In the early chapters of the novel, Scout Finch joins her brother Jem at school....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1056 words
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Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Prejudice in To Kill A Mockingbird   Prejudice is a strong word.  In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, a black man, Tom Robinson, was accused of raping a white woman, Mayella Ewell, and was brought to trial.  There were distinct views concerning Tom Robinson's innocence – views influenced by prejudice. The townspeople of Maycomb believed in Tom's guilt while Atticus and the children believed in Tom's innocence.       The townspeople, from day one, knew what the verdict was going to be even though some of them knew deep down that Tom did not rape Mayella....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 743 words
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Themes in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Some books are written to prove a point or some sort of idea. The novel, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, is an excellent example of proving a point or a theme. Themes in the book include courage, lady, standing in another man's shoes, it's not time to worry, education, and trash. All the themes stand out, however, three in particular are exemplified in the book. The three main themes in To Kill a Mockingbird are courage, lady, and standing in another man's shoes. The first theme is courage....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1105 words
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Essay on Character Parallels in To Kill a Mockingbird - Character Parallels in To Kill a Mockingbird       In real life there are many different types of people, some of them are similar to one another, while others can be opposite/different, just like in the book To Kill a Mocking Bird, by Harper Lee. There are many people in the book, some people are contradictory to one another (character foils), while others resemble each other (character parallels) in both good and/or bad ways. Atticus Finch and Aunt Alexander is an example of a character foil in the book....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 462 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird, Chapter 20 Analysis - In chapter 20 of “To kill a Mockingbird”, Harper Lee wrote about the great divide between black and white people in Maycomb County, and why the public should not judge them too harshly. The Author explains all this through Atticus who is fighting on Tom Robinson’s behalf, that Tom did not rape Mayella Ewell. Atticus tried to persuade the jury beyond reasonable doubt, that Mayella was simply claiming Tom had raped her, to cover up for her wanting to kiss and tempt Tom Robinson (A black man). Atticus explained that Mayella had obviously broken no law, but “a rigid and time-honoured code of their society” and whoever broke this code would be “hounded from their midst as unfit to live with” (pa...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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The Mrs Dubose Episode in To Kill A Mockingbird? - How important is the Mrs Dubose episode in To Kill A Mockingbird. 'To Kill A Mockingbird' is an important novel as it deals with numerous issues such as; growing up, prejudice, tolerance, understanding of others and courage. This well written story by Harper Lee focuses on a family living in Maycomb County, a microcosm of American Society concerned with only its own problems, in the 1930's. The main plot of this novel concerns a black man being wrongly accused and charged with the rape of a white woman and, due to the racial unfairness that took place at this time, he is convicted....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2287 words
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Summary of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The book To Kill a Mockingbird was written by Harper Lee. It was published in 1960 then it went on to win the Pulitzer prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award winning film. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American Literature. There are so many characters in this book that I can't name all of them. Here are most of the characters. The Finch family contains of Atticus (The head of the household), Aunt Alexandra (Atticus's sister), (Jem) Jeremy (The oldest of Atticus's two children), (Scout) Jean Louise (The youngest of the two ....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1161 words
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Racial themes in the film To Kill A Mockingbird - Racial themes in the film To Kill A Mockingbird Racial categories are created in the film To Kill A Mockingbird through a complex societal hierarchy founded in difference. Although all of Macon county lives in poverty, the town does not unite on the basis of this shared experience, but instead focuses on their differences, both real and imagined, to segregate themselves. The town operates under a general assumption that wealthier whites hold the most power and prestige, followed by poorer whites, while all blacks, regardless of financial station, are considered to be the lowest citizens....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 835 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay: Use of Symbolism - Use of Symbolism in To Kill A Mockingbird "I'd rather you shoot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you'll go after birds. Shoot all the bluejays you want , if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." This is what Atticus Finch tells his children after they are given air-rifles for Christmas. Uniquely, the title of the classic novel by Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird, was taken from this passage. At first glance, one may wonder why Harper Lee decided to name her book after what seems to be a rather insignificant excerpt....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1709 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird - Relationship of Two Characters - To Kill A Mockingbird - Relationship of Two Characters In the beginning, all was good and calm in the lives of the Finches. Members of the family included Atticus, Jem, Scout, Aunt Alexandra, and Calpurnia. The relationship of two of the main characters, Atticus and Jem, is of particular interest. In the beginning section of To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the relationship of Atticus and Jem is simple. Jem sees Atticus as older and less active then the fathers of his friends at school....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1048 words
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Parallels between Scottsboro and To Kill a Mockingbird - The Scottsboro and Maycomb trials took place in the 1930s, where the trials both have identical causes with the same conclusion, though its a tragedy event that happened however it have influenced the world today. The resemblance between Scottsboro and Maycomb leads the people into thinking about the Great Depression and the most infamous case that took place in Scottsboro, relating to Maycomb. Though there are no reasonable causes or hateful affairs between opposing characters, yet it seems like racism between white and the Afro-Americans had started the conflict....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Racism]
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To Kill a Mockingbird - The Character of Atticus Finch - To Kill a Mockingbird - The Character of Atticus Finch Kind and understanding, strict but fair, Atticus Finch embodies everything that a father should be. A man of great strength and courage, he is Scout and Jem's hero; the steady presence that keeps them grounded and their only connection to the adult world. He is their teacher, their protector, and their friend. He takes on these responsibilities without hesitation, and cares far Scout and Jem the only way he knows how. Some say it's a misguided effort at parenthood, but the reader sees that Atticus' episodes with his children are what make him an exemplary father....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 564 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird: Jem Grows Up - To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, has won many prestigious awards and is still a very classic and appreciated book in our society today. Jem, a character in the book, grows up and realizes that you have to step in someone else’s shoes to understand why they make the decisions that they make. Once Jem saw that the knot-hole in the tree was filled with cement he started crying because he stepped into Boo Radley’s shoes. Also, When Jem learned that Mrs. Dubose had died, he stepped into her shoes and then felt sorry for her....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 619 words
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Respect in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird -Respect Respect is something you earn by being a good person or doing something admirable. All of the citizens of Maycomb look up to Atticus and see him as a respectable person. Atticus is the character in the novel that has the most respect. He is a caring, loving father, the only member of Maycomb who will actually defend a negro, and he always displays respect for other people. Atticus is a great leader of his family, teaching his children morals and life lessons....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 485 words
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Use of Symbols and Symbolism in To Kill A Mockingbird - Use of Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee effectively uses symbolism throughout her novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. Jem's nursing of the flowers denotes his courage that he nurses in order to be able to tolerate people's criticism of his family, especially of his father. He was forced to take care of the camellias just as he was forced to live with anger, disappointment and a big question mark in his young heart about the workings of grownups. Atticus "never thought Jem'd be the one to lose his head over this" (110)....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1116 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird Essays - Atticus Finch - Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, Harper Lee's, To Kill a Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior, to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, and the struggle between blacks and whites. Atticus Finch, a lawyer and single parent in a small southern town in the 1930's, is appointed by the local judge to defend Tom Robinson, a black man, who is accused of raping a white woman. Friends and neighbors object when Atticus puts up a strong and spirited defense on behalf of the accused black man....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1095 words
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Chapters 1- 6 of To Kill A Mockingbird - The first five chapters of To Kill a Mockingbird introduce the setting, atmosphere, theme, and many different characters, who have unique characteristics. The theme of prejudice is also developed in this introductory section. The Finch family and some of their neighbours are introduced as well, along with important elements such as the Radley house. The Radley house is an important element of mystery in the beginning chapters. As Scout was describing the setting, she described the mysterious house by saying, “The Radley Place was inhabited by an unknown entity the mere description of whom was enough to make us behave for days on end,” (Lee 6)....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 810 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essays: Discrimination and Prejudice - Discrimination and Prejudice in To Kill A Mocking Bird           Discrimination and prejudice were very common acts in the early and middle 1900's. Prejudice in this book is displayed by the acts of hate and misunderstanding because of someone's color. People of color were the majority that were treated unfairly. During this time in the southern states, black people had to use separate bathrooms, drinking fountains, sections in restaurants, churches, and even go to separate schools. Although much of the discrimination was directed towards blacks, there were plenty of accounts towards impoverished families by those that had money....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1388 words
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The Trial in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The Trial in To Kill a Mockingbird The trial of Tom takes up a great deal of space in the novel because it gives Harper Lee a chance to do an in-depth exploration of characters and situations. The people involved in the case are Bob and Mayella Ewell, Tom Robinson and Atticus Finch. The alleged rape of Mayella by Tom allows Harper Lee to look in detail at issues of racial and social prejudice in Maycomb. Bob Ewell is the villain of the novel and, as a result of the trial, he tries to get revenge on Atticus and his family....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1127 words
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Racism in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Racism in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee "Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up is something I don't pretend to understand" [1] This is Maycomb's usual disease; the disease is prejudice, which includes racism sexism, difference in class, piety and other prejudiced opinions formed in the small county of Maycomb. In Harper Lee's Novel racism is described through the eyes of a nine-year old girl Scout, which still has not been affected by the disease that is overcoming the town....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 891 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - A. Setting: 1. Year: 1940’s 2. Location: Maycomb, Alabama 3. Period of Time: Three Summer’s B. Point of Veiw: First Person C. Begining: Scout, the main character and narrorator of the story, Jem, her brother, and Dill, their neighbor friend that visited every summer, loved to act out stories they knew. They did all kinds of stories like Tarzan and Dracula. Signaling the end of summer and the absence of Dill, the school year began. Scout started school, having a very rough first day....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 523 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essay - Modes of Communication in To Kill a Mockingbird Effective communication is a result of the utilization of different techniques to convey a particular idea or perspective. Different methods used to express a person's feelings are found throughout society and aid in creating a learned individual, family, and community. In the novel To Kill a Mocking Bird, Harper Lee uses several modes of communication to display her feelings on moral, political, and social issues. Lee's tactics parallel those used by one character in her novel, Atticus Finch....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 2012 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Scout Finch is not the stereotypical girl from the 1930’s. Agents the wishes of everyone around her, she grows up in overalls instead of dresses. Scout plays in the dirt and sand, instead of in the kitchen. In the novel To Kill a Mocking Bird, by Harper Lee, Scout is the wild spirited narrator, growing up in the small town of Maycomb. As she gets older, she learns mostly from her father Atticus how to interact with people. Scout learns to show dignity and respect to everyone, under any circumstances....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 563 words
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Cultures in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ is a brilliantly written novel by Harper Lee. The novel is set in Alabama, USA, in the 1930’s and tells the story of a lawyer who defends a wrongly accused black man while trying to raise his two children, Scout and Jem, as they go through childhood and adolescence, life’s most active learning stages. The book is written through the eyes of Atticus’ naïve young daughter, Scout, and southern ways enhance the plot of the story to give it a realistic and historical perspective....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird Essays] 4930 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - As readers, we saw Scout mature and grow as our narrator and as a person. She learned many things, but also lost many things. As she grew up and changed, she began to see how things really were, and gained the knowledge of the pure hate that one man can show another. Scout lost her innocence when she found this out. She began to see how cruel the world could be to someone who is a little different or strange. She saw this in the prejudice that was shown to Tom Robinson, Walter Cunningham, Miss Maudie and even herself....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2044 words
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Hypothetical Sountrack for To Kill A Mockingbird - "Sugar We're Going Down" Fall Out Boy pp. 75-76 I chose "Sugar We're Going Down" because Atticus decides to defend Tom Robinson. Lines 9 and 10 say, "We're going down, down in an earlier round and sugar we're going down swinging." This relates to the book in that Atticus knows that he will lose the case, but will try his hardest because he knows it is the right thing to do. "Landslide" Fleetwood Mac p. 115-117 Lines 10 through 13 of the song "Landslide" talk about how things change and "children get older." Scout is bothered by how her brother is changing because he is getting older....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 830 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - It all started when a girl named Jean Louise Finch, (Scout) was telling the story about her brother and how he broke his arm at the elbow. She went back two years to where they had tried to “Make Boo come out.” Boo Radley, also known as Arthur Radley. Back before Jem and Scout were even born Arthur Radley and his family moved to Maycomb. There was Arthur, his older brother Nathan, and Mr. and Mrs. Radley. There was a story about the Radleys, saying that when their family moved into town, they were welcomed but chose to stick to themselves....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2844 words
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Symbols and Symbolism in To Kill A Mockingbird - Symbols, Themes and Characters - To Kill A Mockingbird - Symbols, Themes and Characters Now, you're probably wondering what is To Kill A Mockingbird all about. Well that is what I am going to be telling you about in this paper. You will find out that To Kill A Mockingbird is full of different themes, symbols, conflicts and many different characters. There is a theme of a coexistence of good and evil in this novel. Harper dramatizes Scout and Jem's transition from a perspective of childhood innocence. Many of the characters assume that people are good because they have never seen evil....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 926 words
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To Kill A Mockingbird Essays: Boo and Tom Misunderstood - Boo and Tom Misunderstood in To Kill a Mockingbird In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, Atticus tells Jem and Scout to, "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird," he is referring to the notion that a mockingbird is a harmless creature and does nothing but sing and bring happiness to the world. Harper Lee takes the title for her novel from this passage because the imagery of the mockingbird is analogous to the characters of both Boo Radley and Tom Robinson....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays] 1066 words
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