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Your search returned over 400 essays for "to kill a mockingbird"
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Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - “To Kill A Mockingbird” is marvelous and unforgettable novel. Not only show how dramatic, sad in and old town – Maycomb be like, but through her unique writings, some big conflicts about politics and critical is going on through this tired old Southern town. Not just in general like education, friendship, neighbors but also pacific in individuals like family and the people’s characteristics themselves. In one book yet can covered with such many problems, Harper Lee must have been experienced a lot and deeply understanding that time....   [tags: To Kill A Mockingbird]
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865 words
(2.5 pages)
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Use of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird - To Kill a Mockingbird was written by Harper Lee, the novel was published in 1960. The novel was written in a time of racial inequality in the United States. To Kill a Mockingbird is told in the perspective of a young girl named Scout, in the late 1920s and early 1930s, who is naïve and innocent. Scout matures throughout the novel through her father, Atticus, and she becomes more aware of the prejudice in Maycomb County. When Atticus loses his case, Scout and her brother, Jem, learn that blacks cannot have a fair trial, but their new found maturity has taught them not assume someone’s character without knowing them first, such as with Boo Radley....   [tags: Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird]
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2301 words
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The Theme of Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird - One of the widely recognized controversies in American history is the 1930s, which housed the Great Depression and the post-civil war, the ruling of Plessy versus Ferguson and the Jim Crow Laws, and segregation. While textbooks detail the factual aspect of the time there is only one other literature that can exhibit the emotion experienced in the era. To Kill a Mockingbird is the acclaimed novel that displays the experiences of the South, through inequality and segregation, social class differences and the right to fairness....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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2121 words
(6.1 pages)
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Characters of To Kill a Mockingbird; Stereotypes or not? - Characters of To Kill a Mockingbird; Stereotypes or not. The characters of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird are all different in their own ways. Sometimes they can seem like the most infuriating people in the world, but then again they can be helpful, loving, and caring. The citizens of Maycomb County are stereotyped a lot throughout the book. They are labeled as many different things, but some of the things that are said aren’t entirely correct judgments. A lot of people in To Kill a Mockingbird stereotype others by the way they look or talk based on what society considers normal....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 595 words
(1.7 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Sometimes the very most unexpected events that happen in people’s lives are during their childhood and it impacts them for the rest of their lives. The emotion of the event stays with them forever, and it affects them In the future. The emotion by our childhood sometimes gets in our way of making our choices. in the book To Kill a Mockingbird, Helen Keller tells us a story about a five year old girl named Scout dealing with problems during her childhood and how the events that happen to her make her understand what problems that she may have in the future....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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876 words
(2.5 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Life Lessons Throughout their lives, individuals learn many valuable lessons that help them to grow and mature as human beings. This is evident numerous times throughout Harper Lee’s fictional novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Individuals in this novel learn these amazing lessons through Atticus Finch’s extraordinary teachings of morals. Atticus goes on to further teach valuable lessons of courage. Lastly, Atticus continues to teach valuable lessons, about sacrifice. Throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch is portrayed as an extraordinary character who teaches valuable life lessons about morals, courage, and sacrifice....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1072 words
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The Narrator Debate: To Kill A Mockingbird - Paul Simon, the musician, once said, “If you can get humor and seriousness at the same time, [you have] created a special little thing, and [that is] what [I am] looking for, because if you get pompous, you lose everything” (Simon 1). Racism in the 1930s and until the 1960s was a very serious issue. As stated, authors have taken this serious issue and turned it into great pieces of literature. Many of them have truly shown the seriousness of racism in society. Even though, criticism, as always, continues....   [tags: literary analysis, To Kill A Mockingbird, ]
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1198 words
(3.4 pages)
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A Member of the Jury in To Kill a Mockingbird - The courthouse was crowded, all seats were taken and many were standing in the back. It was silent, no one spoke, not even a baby cried out. There was the Judge sitting in the front of the room, the defendant, the solicitor, and the jury. I was a member of the jury that day. Everyone knew the truth, the defendant was innocent, and the evidence that was established was supportive and clear. The jury’s decision however, was not based on evidence, but on race. A jury is supposed to put their beliefs aside and make a decision based on the information given during the trial....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 657 words
(1.9 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In the last century, there have certainly been many "greats" - novels, books and stories that impress, amaze and make one think. Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird", however, is unique among all these poignant pieces of literature in that the novel solely develops Lee's idea, brought out by Atticus in the novel, to "...shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird" (90). This phrase is expounded by the character Miss Maudie when she says "...mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1325 words
(3.8 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird: A Timeless Classic - Harper Lee’s only book, To Kill a Mockingbird, is the stereotypical tale of childhood and innocence, yet it successfully incorporates mature themes, like the racism in the South at the time, to create a masterpiece of a work that has enraptured people’s minds and hearts for generations. According to esteemed novelist Wally Lamb, “It was the first time in my life that a book had sort of captured me. That was exciting; I didn’t realize that literature could do that” (111). Scout’s witty narration and brash actions make her the kind of heroine you can’t help but root for, and the events that take place in Maycomb County are small-scale versions of the dilemmas that face our world today....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1248 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Theme of Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird - In the book To Kill a Mockingbird, many minor themes are present such as gender and age. However, the largest and therefore major theme of the book is racism. All of the events and themes in the book had only one purpose, to support the theme of racism. One of the most important events in the book was Tom Robinson’s trial, which was unfairly judged due to the fact that the jury could not see beyond the color of Tom’s skin. The put their own racist opinions ahead of what is right and just. One of the most important events in the novel circulated around racism....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1053 words
(3 pages)
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Stereotyped Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird - The characters of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird are all different in their own way. Sometimes they can seem like the most infuriating people in the world, but then again they can be helpful, loving, and caring. The citizens of Maycomb County are stereotyped a lot throughout the book. They are labeled as many different things, but some of the stereotypes made aren’t entirely correct. A lot of people in To Kill a Mockingbird stereotype others by the way they look or talk based on what society considers normal....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 703 words
(2 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ is a novel written by Harper Lee. It is set during the early 20th Century in the fictional town of Maycomb. Lee has decided to write the novel from a child’s point of view because a child is innocent but as the novel progresses the narrator, Scout, loses her innocence as she deals with the complications of her father being a lawyer. The novel revolves around racism and Scout sees discrimination wherever she goes whether it is racial or social prejudice. The town’s people agree with the idea that whites are superior to blacks....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 545 words
(1.6 pages)
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To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Many view America as a land of opportunity, one that preaches freedom and has specific laws to ensure the equality of this pursuit of freedom. Despite the intention of promoting freedom and equality, many American laws transcend these values and mirror the true sentiments of our nation’s constituents. These laws cannot serve to uphold equality if that intention does not come to fruition in their practice and application to societal issues. In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Tom Robinson, a black man in a mostly white community, faces accusations and a subsequent trial for the rape of Mayella Ewell, a white girl of the town....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1325 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In To Kill a Mockingbird, we are told the story of the lives of the Finch family through the eyes of one Jean Louise “Scout” Finch. She is around the age of eight years old, so she is very young. Essentially, she has always wanted to go to school, but when she gets there, she finds that her education level surpasses that of the first grade. Her father forces her to stay in school. That summer she meets a peculiar person who calls himself Dill, although his name is Charles Baker Harris. Scout and her brother, Jem, quickly befriend him....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 862 words
(2.5 pages)
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Courage in To Kill a Mockingbird - An idea that recurs in or pervades a work of art of literature can be referred to as a “Theme”. Themes often explore timeless and universal ideas and may be implied rather than stated explicitly. Theme is an important part of fictional stories. Several themes are presented in the novel to kill a mocking bird. One of the reoccurring themes in to kill a mockingbird is courage. Courage is when you know you’re beaten. The character Atticus, for instance, who was a seasoned lawyer acted courageous defending Tom Robinson....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 907 words
(2.6 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the main characters: Atticus, Scout and Jem were faced with many losing battles such as Tom Robinson's case, the "mad dog incident" and Mrs. Dubose's addiction to morphine. This builds on the theme of there are things in life that won't go your way. The book takes place in the 1930's or 1940's in a small town in Alabama called Maycomb. The novel takes us through the life and perils that the main characters undergo and teach us about growing up and being mature....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1481 words
(4.2 pages)
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee is novel set in a three year period through the ‘great depression’. Atticus Finch (Jem and scouts father) is originally portrayed as a friendly and understanding person, though when he attends court defending a ‘black man’ as his job, suddenly he and his family begin to suffer racial hatred from their community. The story features on the themes of racism, community morals and the realisation of certain truths whilst growing up. It is a fascinating novel with a great storyline full of drama and unexposed realities....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 1077 words
(3.1 pages)
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Courage in To Kill a Mockingbird - True, unadulterated courage is a fickle thing. One can never know wether the intentions of the person who displays it are sincere and rightful, rather than based on prideful or egotistical reasons. In “To Kill a Mockingbird” Harper Lee illustrates a variety of different kinds of courage through many of her characters, using pride, morality, impulsiveness, and anger as the main reasons of its execution. Though every one of those character’s displays of courage were significant in their own way, three characters come to mind when the thought of courage and Lee’s ....masterpiece associate....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 998 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Mockingbirds in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Walt Whitman’s 1859 poem “Out of the Cradle Rocking Endlessly” depicts the mockingbird as a symbol of innocence that chants or sings of fond memories from the past. By contrast, Harper Lee’s famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird, published in 1960, written almost a century after Whitman’s poem, portrays the mockingbird as innocent but as a fragile creature with horrific memories – memories of discrimination, isolation, and violence. Harper Lee wrote her novel, which is rooted in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, in the Deep South, during a time of segregation and discrimination, social issues which can be seen not only in the novel but were witnessed by Harper Lee in her own life....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1988 words
(5.7 pages)
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The Mockingbirds of To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” (p.90) Miss. Maudie, one of the main protagonists in To Kill a Mockingbird, warns the young girl Scout that mockingbirds should not to be killed or hunted down because they represent those who are kind and innocent. So, on a broader spectrum, the term “to kill a mockingbird” symbolizes cruel and improper behavior towards people with good hearts and intentions. In the town of Maycomb, unethical behaviors, such as prejudice and gossip, are most commonly used against the “mockingbirds”....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1256 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Mockingbirds of To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy.” Those were the words spoken by Miss Maudie Atkinson. She tries to tell Jem about why mockingbirds should not be killed. Although there are many characters in the novel, the mockingbirds that were the most obvious in the story were Tom Robinson, Boo Radley, and Mrs. Dubose. Even though there are many other characters to choose from, the most obvious mockingbirds are Tom Robinson, Boo Radley, and Mrs. Dubose. The way that Boo Radley was (theoretically) killed (by society), is the fact that he is not extremely religious....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 555 words
(1.6 pages)
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Innocent Victims in To Kill a Mockingbird - Who would want to kill a mockingbird that sings and keeps people at peace. Only mean and cruel people for example Bob Ewell, a drunk and abusive father. This symbol of mockingbird appears in the story many times. According to Merriam-Webster’s Middle School Dictionary a mockingbird is a songbird of the southern U.S. that is noted for the sweetness of its song and for imitations of the notes of other birds (482). The symbol of killing a blameless bird is repeated through out the story when Harper Lee describes Boo Radley, Tom Robinson, and Calpurnia....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, victims, Harper Lee, ] 872 words
(2.5 pages)
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Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird - True role models are those who possess the qualities that we would want to have in the near future and those who interest us in a way that make us want to be a better person. They teach us more about ourselves and encourage us to make better choices. A role model is not just someone who is successful, but someone who has had similar experiences that we have had. In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee demonstrates that Atticus Finch is a true role model. Over the course of the novel, Atticus stands up for his beliefs, respects everyone despite who they are and behaves as a true father....   [tags: To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee, heroes, ]
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1485 words
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The Different Types of Prejudice Depicted in Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The theme of prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird broadens to a further extent than just the situation of racial discrepancy between the blacks and the whites. Although, the racial discrimination mainly towards the blacks is the most prominent occurrence of injustice at Harper Lee’s time- the early Twentieth century, the whole novel includes several, other forms of prejudice that portray the unfavourable effects that was endured by innocent people. These blameless individuals were referred to mockingbirds, since it was a sin to kill one as said by Atticus, “Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” So, therefore mockingbirds are a rep...   [tags: to kill a mockingbird] 2201 words
(6.3 pages)
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Hope in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is extensively a story of hope. Hope is to wish for something with expectation of its fulfilment and to have confidence; trust. This is shown through the themes, issues and the characters in the novel. Atticus represents hope, he is optimist. He is from the higher class and defends the lower class and still has the anticipation to win. The Finch family has hope as Atticus has taught his children to be accepting and have open-minds. Racism and prejudice, give people the hope for change....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 925 words
(2.6 pages)
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Prejudice In To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - The prejudices present in the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, display the views of the Old South. Defined by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, a prejudice is an adverse opinion formed without just grounds or before sufficient knowledge. A significant prejudice present is sexism against women. The segregation of social classes is also exhibited in the novel. Most importantly, racism plays a dominant role in To Kill a Mockingbird. Although very common in the South, the prejudices displayed are morally wrong....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 611 words
(1.7 pages)
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Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - A symbol is a word or expression which signifies something other than the physical object to which it directly refers. The book “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee contains three recognizable symbols. “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” (103) This could possibly be a symbol for Tom Robinson. He was innocent, yet sentenced to death because of his ethnicity....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 509 words
(1.5 pages)
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Harper Lee Exposed in To Kill a Mockingbird - “I said what I have to say” (What Harper Lee). This is a quote from a very rare interview with the renowned author Harper Lee. Unlike many award winning authors, Harper Lee receives all her publicity from just one book, To Kill a Mockingbird. This was the only book Lee ever wrote, and the quote previously stated is Lee’s response when questioned why she did not write any other books. To look at the skeleton of To Kill a Mockingbird, you would say it is the type of book to appeal to all ages. The viewpoint is from spunky, Scout Finch....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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Importance of Role Models in To Kill a Mockingbird - Take a moment to think, what would you do if you didn’t have your parents/guardians. How would you be acting. Where would you be. Adults have a big part in a child’s life not only because they are there to support them but being role models to show them how they should be acting and maturing over time. The novel “To Kill a Mockingbird written by Harper Lee” takes place in a small town named Maycomb and it has a great deal to do with children maturing over time and how adults come into place as role models....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1072 words
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Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Prejudices are most difficult to eradicate from the heart whose soil has never been loosened or fertilized by education: they grow there, firm as weeds among stones. CHARLOTTE BRONTE, Jane Eyre Prejudice is something which has affected everyone at one time or another. It is like looking out a frosted window and not seeing a clear picture. When people look through a frosted window they sometimes see a blurred vision of the world outside. Sometimes we see people as very different from ourselves when really they are just a very little bit different from us....   [tags: Examining Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird]
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595 words
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The Title of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The novel is written by Harper Lee The title, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ is a very fitting title for the novel, because the story revolves around the idea of innocence being lost, destroyed by evil and the cruelty of a narrow-minded society. Mockingbirds are harmless creatures that ‘don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us,’ but it is powerless against its attackers. The main mockingbirds in the novel are the characters, Boo Radley, and Tom Robinson who are both attacked by the cruel society of Maycomb in different ways but are defenceless and cannot fight back....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1138 words
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Teaching To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel written by Harper lee in 1960. The novel tells the story of Atticus Finch, a white lawyer, and Tom Robinson, a black servant, accused of raping a white female. Finch defends Robinson in court arguing lack of evidence as his main point. However, the judge and jury still believe the woman’s testimony and orders Robinson to be killed. The novel has been praised for its outstanding literature since its publication. However, it remains a banned book by the American Library Association for its use of racial slurs and profanity....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1491 words
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The Wisdom of Atticus in Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - To Kill a Mockingbird focuses on “Maycomb’s usual disease,” as a pivotal part of the book, but also shows that compassion and wisdom can exist in these most bleak areas. The prejudice and bigotry comes from the lack of knowledge of Maycomb, and their fear to change what they have grown up with. Pre-conceived ideas are the main reason that Maycomb is ignorant of black people as they are afraid what a change of those pre-conceived ideas will bring. Even so, compassion still exists, as Atticus is able to save Scout and Jem from the influence of ‘Maycomb’s usual disease.’ Wisdom is also embodied by Atticus, where his wisdom, which is not necessarily knowledge but life experience, is able to forc...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 978 words
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The Transformation of Aunt Alexandra in To Kill a Mockingbird - People are always influenced by family members. Sometimes this influence is positive and sometimes it is negative, yet no matter what, it will change a person’s life. Change can be caused by that person fitting into the ways of a household, or be forced to act differently in the presence of others. Either way, that person will never be the same again. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, characters are constantly being influenced by family members. Aunt Alexandra, started off as a rude and bossy woman, but as she became closer to Atticus, Jem, and Scout, she changed into a more loving and compassionate person....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1001 words
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The Civil Rights Movement and To Kill a Mockingbird - The beginning of the Civil Rights Movement era corresponds with the time that Harper Lee was writing about Scout Finch and her brother Jem. They live in the very state that events like the Montgomery Bus boycott would take place. The fictional town of Maycomb is in Alabama, the same state where Martin Luther King Jr. would rise to be the voice of African Americans aching for equality. The actual movement may have started in 1960 but that is the same year that To Kill a Mockingbird was published and huge events were rupturing the south, throughout the novel readers can see the attitude of a want and need for equality in characters and some events....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1026 words
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Use of Minor Characters in To Kill a Mockingbird - Minor characters are often more important than they initially seem, and can be just as engaging and complicated as major characters. Furthermore, protagonists are isolated without the people that surround and influence them subliminally. This applies to the intriguing minor characters one has the privilege of discovering in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. Specifically, Lee uses minor characters to effectively disprove stereotypes and establishing setting. Not only do they influence the direction of the plot, but also Scout and her development as a character....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1288 words
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Parallels between Scottsboro and To Kill a Mockingbird - The Scottsboro and Maycomb trials took place in the 1930s, where the trials both have identical causes with the same conclusion, though its a tragedy event that happened however it have influenced the world today. The resemblance between Scottsboro and Maycomb leads the people into thinking about the Great Depression and the most infamous case that took place in Scottsboro, relating to Maycomb. Though there are no reasonable causes or hateful affairs between opposing characters, yet it seems like racism between white and the Afro-Americans had started the conflict....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Racism]
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Themes in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - To kill a mockingbird written by Harper Lee. Themes are the subject of a talk, a piece of writing or a person's thoughts. There are many themes present in this great American classic such as courage, racism, prejudice, morality and of course coming of age. Lee communicates these themes with characters, events that unfold and the scenarios that Jem and Scout have to face. One of many themes that is evidently present throughout the book is prejudice. The main action is of Atticus defending the innocent ‘Tom Robinson’ who is falsely accused of the rape of a white girl....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 616 words
(1.8 pages)
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Courage in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Courage exists in several forms in Harper Lee’s novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. As defined by Atticus Finch, real courage "…when you know you're licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what” (149). The novel explores the how this real courage can be shown in different ways through the lives of many characters in Maycomb, particularly, Tom Robinson, Mrs. Dubose, and Atticus. Their courage is evident through their lifestyle, actions, and beliefs. One of the characters who show real courage is Tom Robinson....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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Courage in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - “Courage is when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what” that what Atticus Finch thinks Courage is. Courage is a major theme in the book by Harper Lee called To Kill a Mockingbird and how it is shown in the characters of this novel. Courage is shown in Jem, Scout, Mrs. Dubose and the main character which showed a lot of courage was Atticus. Courage is shown in Jem and Scout many times throughout the novel and here are some of them. Early in the novel, Scout shows courage she had on the first day of school....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 778 words
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Courage in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - Harper Lee's novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" explores how courage can be shown in several important characters in the novel. They are Mrs. Dubose, Atticus, Jem and Maycomb county itself. Courage exists in several forms as cleverly depicted in the novel, such as childish courage, moral courage. The first iconic character in the novel known for her split personality and great moral courage is Mrs. Dubose. She was a morphine addict and was addicted to morphine as a painkiller prescribed by her doctor for many years....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1128 words
(3.2 pages)
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Knowing Your Place in To Kill a Mockingbird - Unspoken barriers divide people according to class, wealth, intelligence and background. This affected numerous people throughout history who were subsequently appointed inequitable places in society according to factors such as family ancestry, behaviour and more. In To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee argues that negative repercussions will arise when one attempts to step out of their preordained place in a small judgmental society. This is evidently proven through the characters of Mayella Ewell, the children Jem and Scout, and finally, Atticus Finch....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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1275 words
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The Mockingbirds in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The significance of the store To Kill a Mockingbird is the expression mocking bird appears in the story lots of times. Also the most significant novel in this whole book is the mockingbird symbol. Another significant part of the story is the definition of a mockingbird and it is a type of Finch, it’s also a small bird who likes to sing. It got the name mockingbird because when it sings it is mocking other birds. (http://www.allfreeessays.com/essays/The-Significance-Of-The-Title-Of/21174.html) The mockingbirds in the story were Tom Robinson, Calpurnia, and Boo Radley....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, symbolism, ] 679 words
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Use of the Mockingbird Motif in To Kill a Mockingbird - How Harper Lee uses the Mockingbird motif "To Kill A Mockingbird" has a main theme of prejudice and the persecution of innocent and harmless individuals. The main themes of this book very much link in with the title, which is explained by Harper Lee through Atticus and Miss Maudie (pg 96.) Miss Maudie explains - "Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don't one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird. This is the first obvious reference to the title of the book and the mockingbird motif....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1249 words
(3.6 pages)
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To Kill A Mockingbird: Violence Isn't the Answer - “Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner I learned to hold in, the better off everybody would be.” - Scout Finch, Chapter Nine, Page One. Growing up, a child puts up walls, a certain mask that shields them from all the hurt and all the anger that has bottled up inside. These children are taught to use words instead of their fists, taking away the primary instinct to use violence as a way to get their point across....   [tags: To Kill A Mockingbird]
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958 words
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The Theme of Injustice Depicted in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird - In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, injustice is a main theme that is reflected towards many characters. To Kill a Mockingbird, is a novel written by Harper Lee and published in the nineteen-sixties. Many characters in the story are treated unfairly in society due to racial or prejudicial attitudes. Overall these characters are innocent victims of injustice. Atticus, Boo Radley, and Tom Robinson are considered to be mockingbirds in the novel. A mockingbird was defined as a bird that did nothing wrong, but sang beautiful music for us to hear....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird] 1197 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird - The author Nelle Harper Lee was born in1926 in the small southwestern Alabama town of Monroeville. She is the youngest of four children of Amasa Coleman Lee and Frances Finch Lee. Harper Lee attended Huntingdon College 1944-45, studied law at University of Alabama 1945-49, and studied one year at Oxford University. In the 1950s she worked as a reservation clerk with Eastern Air Lines in New York City. In order to concentrate on writing Harper Lee gave up her position and moved into a cold-water apartment with makeshift furniture....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2533 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird - English essay on To Kill a Mockingbird In 'To Kill a Mockingbird' Atticus finch is presented as a respectable well-known man. Before Atticus Finch there was a customary tradition at the Finch's landing, which has been in place since Simon Finch made it his home and died there. The customary tradition was ' the men in the family remained on Finch's landing and made their living from cotton'. In the twentieth century Atticus Finch went to Montgomery to read law and John Hale Finch, Atticus' younger brother studied medicine in Boston....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2181 words
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Teaching about Prejudice through To Kill a Mockingbird - Why should To Kill a Mockingbird be published. One good reason is because To Kill a Mockingbird is a great read about the human dignity that connects people of all sorts. It helps students realize that life was not exactly fair in the 1930s. The lack of humane behavior is shocking and will arouse some students, plus increase their knowledge of history in the 1930s by way of telling the story through a child’s perspective. In To Kill a Mockingbird, there were numerous examples of American realities that can relate to those of today....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, ] 666 words
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Influence of Stereotypes in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Introduction Section One: Harper Lee’s Life Section Two: Time Period Influences on Lee’s Writing Section Three: Influence of Stereotypes Section Four: To Kill a Mockingbird Reviews Conclusion Works Cited Introduction Which doll is better. In the 1950s, psychologists Kenneth and Mamie Clark asked black children between three and seven to answer this simple, yet revealing question. The kids were shown four dolls that were exactly the same except for their skin colors. Almost three quarters of the children chose the white doll as being superior and attributed positive characteristics to it....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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To Kill a Mockingbird - In the widely known novel To Kill A Mockingbird there are two families that are very diverse and are text book examples of complete opposites on the moral ladder of success. The Cunninghams and the Ewells have two very distinct and opposite reputations. The Cunninghams which are very respected while the Ewells very much despised. The Ewells are given the privilege to hunt out of season, so that the residents of the small town of Maycomb would not have to tolerate their continuous begging twenty-four hours a day for seven days a week....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1041 words
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Arthur Boo Radley in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - There is no law without justice yet "…it's a sin to kill a mockingbird." (chp 10). In E. Harper Lee's The Mocking Bird, Sheriff Tate is forced with the challenge of deciding whether or not to cover up Bob Ewell's death in the children's defense. In the story, he decides to "…Let the dead bury the dead." (chp 30). Sherriff Tate's choice to cover up for Arthur 'Boo' Radley is the right choice because Boo Radley did the morally right thing, the situation would be a waste of resources, and it would have brought unwanted commotion to the town....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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Response to Questions on Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird - 1. Allusion: The name of the father, Atticus, probably comes from the Roman orator Titus Pomponius Atticus, who was known for never taking a side in political struggles but rather staying neutral. This is characteristic of Atticus Finch who, despite being severely criticized for defending Tom Robinson, tells his children to ignore what people have to say. 2.Characterization: characterization would be when Boo Radley is described as ghost like, or a hermit. They think that he is insane. 3. Static character: Atticus is a man who has demonstrated that he is totally balanced in his approach to humankind....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 890 words
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Fear of Change Illustrated in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Some people hide from change thinking that it will never find them, but change is happening all around, whether it is the seasons or how people think and act things change. Sometimes though, as quickly as the world changes, there are people and things that may not change with everything else. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, there are people who refuse to acknowledge the world changing around them and try to reverse the changes that have already occurred. Two of these people afraid of changes are Bob Ewell and Walter Cunningham....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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Ahead of Her Time: Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - The novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee is thought to have been way ahead of her time of literature and went places were books of that time did not go, and still do not go. Lee went head at the lifestyle of the 1930’s in Alabama, and talked about racism and prejudice as many others stayed away from that topic. In the novel there were many different times where Lee brought out the dark side of the “dirty thirties” she shows prejudice and racism at its worst moments. Lee has her main characters of Jem Finch, and Scout Finch experience prejudice and racism as the book goes on and mainly in the second part....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 915 words
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Growing Up in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Growing up is hard, but when you add in nosey neighbors, scary houses, a stuck up aunt, and taunting children, it becomes more difficult. To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel written by Harper Lee that was published in 1960. The story takes place in Maycomb, Alabama during the 1930s. Scout Finch is a six year old narrator. She lives with her father, her brother, and Calpurnia, their black cook. Scout spends her summers playing with her brother, Jem, and her friend, Dill Harrison. Atticus Finch, Scout’s father, is a lawyer and he is defending Tom Robinson, a black man who is accused of raping Mayella Ewell....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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Courage in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is a timeless novel that has been both accepted and refused by many readers. To Kill a Mockingbird took place is a town called Maycomb. It is narrated by a young girl named Jean Louise Finch, otherwise known as Scout, who learns how to deal with many things in her life. While learning to deal with racism, injustice, and criticism, she also finds courage being showed by many of her role models. The theme courage is best depicted through Boo Radley, Scout and Atticus....   [tags: Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, ] 715 words
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The Role of Racism and Social Injustice in To Kill a Mockingbird - Themes encountered in ‘To Kill a Mocking Bird.’ To Kill a Mocking Bird is a book that has been turned into a movie. The themes that are covered in this interesting book and movie ranges from racism, prejudice to social injustice which goes to show how human beings can be very cruel to fellow human beings simply because they are different from themselves. Tom Robinson’s trial further shows that in a society where the white race is seen to be superior, no other race mattered. This paper therefore is an analysis of the themes that emerge from the court proceedings of the Tom Robinson trial....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird] 860 words
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Courage of Characters in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Courage is what makes ordinary people extraordinary. In Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird, Tom Robinson, a poor black worker accused of raping a white girl is represented by Atticus Finch, a well-to-do white lawyer during the Great Depression. Even though Atticus, and the town, thinks Tom will be accused, but Atticus takes the case anyway. The thematic topic of courage is defined by Atticus as “when you know you’re licked before you begin…and…see it through no matter what,” the characters of Atticus, Boo Radley, and Mrs....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 519 words
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Atticus as a Hero, in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Although they are critiqued, some people do whatever they can do to improve our society. In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch proves himself to be a hero. This small-town lawyer exhibits bravery, strength, and modesty when faced with objection during Maycomb’s quarrel for justice. Without a doubt, Atticus proves that anybody can stand for what he or she believes is right. Throughout the novel, Atticus reveals his bravery. He demonstrates this quality by killing Tim Johnson, the rabid dog....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 978 words
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Inequality and Prejudice in Harper Lee's Novel To Kill A Mockingbird - How can the word “equality” be defined. Is there actually a definition which everyone can agree with. “The quality of being the same in quantity, measure, value, or status”; that is the explanation any dictionary may provide. The problem is, no one has the same way of applying this definition to the real life, and people have different perceptions of what equality really means. In Harper Lee’s novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird”, this idea of looking at equality from different points of view is one of the main themes and situations presented....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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Atticus Finch in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - In to Kill a Mockingbird, Jeremy Atticus Finch, also known as Jem, a small town boy begins as an ignorant, intolerable, naïve, and gullible young boy who has no perspective or interest in the world around him. Jem begins to go through a change of state and mind, which will affect in all aspects of the human world. The story takes place in 1933, the depth of the great depression. As Scout, Jem’s sister describes, “there is nothing to buy and no money to buy things with.” Scout and Jem live in the town of Maycomb, Alabama, a town of prejudice, poverty, and of troubled citizens....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 1087 words
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Scout's Learning Experiences Depicted in To Kill A Mockingbird - You never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough (321). In Harper Lee’s fictional novel To Kill A Mockingbird, she illustrates the harsh reality that exists when ignorance interferes with justice. Set in a small Southern town during the 1930’s, Atticus Finch chooses to defend a black man who is falsely accused of raping a white woman. The town’s representation of Tom Robinson is mirrored by Atticus’s children, Jem and Scout, and their treatment of the town recluse Boo Radley....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 794 words
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Life Lessons in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - No matter where or who a person is, they are always learning something, either about themselves or about the environment around them. In Harper Lee's heartwarming novel titled To Kill A Mockingbird, the main characters Jem and Scout grow and mature throughout the story as they learn both more about themselves and the world around them. As the story progresses, they learn many life lessons including those about prejudice, people and how they have been categorized and judged, and, last but not least, gender issues....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 778 words
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Bob Ewell in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird - "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view... until you climb into his skin and walk around in it" (Lee 20), said the inspirational book character, Atticus Finch, in Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird. This simple quote was used by Atticus to help relieve his daughter and protagonist, Scout, after her misfortunate first day of school. Now, however, the phrase is one of the most renowned book quotes due to its potential real-life applications. Scout may have needed to walk around in the skin of Robert E....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]
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Atticus the Hero in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - Martin Luther King and Gandhi are one of the few people who changed society, and stood on their own. They were individuals who didn’t worry what other people thought. They decided to bring a change in the society. King and Gandhi fought for their own rights and freedom. Lots of people get influenced by a person and make him as a leader, So he can do all the work for them while others were lazy. So this shows that a person can change a society. In “To kill a mocking bird” by Harper lee, in the county of Macomb, Atticus a lawyer defending a black man at that point of the time is changing the society....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, heroesw,] 928 words
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The Role of Education in Jeremy Finch's Life in To Kill a Mockingbird - In the book To Kill a Mockingbird, education played a huge role, especially in Jeremy Finch’s life. Known as Jem, he learned many valuable life lessons that not many people today even know. Throughout the novel, he learns bravery, in many different case scenarios. He also learns about cultural divisions and prejudice, which happens to be based on education. The most significant character development for Jem is bravery. This was mostly taught to him by his father, Atticus, when he tells Jem to read for Mrs....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, education,] 542 words
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The Two Types of Underprivileged People in To Kill a Mockingbird - In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, the main character, “Scout” learns that there are two types of underprivileged people in this world. The first type of poor people are those such as the Cunningham’s, who are so humble, that they manage live with the very little that they have. The next types of poor people are those such as the Ewells, who are a load of filthy, drunkyards. This family takes everything for granted, without the least bit of appreciation. These two families are examples of the poor people in this world....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee, poverty, ] 574 words
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Gentleman of the South in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - True role models are those who have the qualities that we would want to have in the near future and those who make us want to be a better person. They teach us more about ourselves and encourage us to make better choices. A role modle is not just someone who is successful, but someone who has had similar experiences that we have had. In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee demonstrates that Atticus Finch is a true role model. Over the course of the novel, Atticus stands up for his beliefs, respects everyone regardless of who they are and behaves as a true father....   [tags: heroes, To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee,] 955 words
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Atticus: The Ideal Father in To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper lee in this novel makes me feel relief and happiness that a man like Atticus raises Scout and Jem. Atticus is an ideal father, even though he makes mistakes, he always tries to be the best father. His parenting style is firm but fair and he lets the children make their own decisions and discoveries. He treats the children as equals always telling the truth about everything and letting them call him “Atticus”. As a father he leads by example. Atticus teaches his children many valuable lessons....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee] 723 words
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Calpurnia: A Second Mother in To Kill a Mockingbird - “Yo’ folks might be better’n the Cunninghams but it don’t count for nothin’ the way you’re disgracin’ ‘em if you can't act fit to eat at the table you can just sit here and eat in the kitchen!” This is just one of the many examples Calpurnia sets for the children. Calpurnia is the Finch’s cook but she takes her role in the children’s life more seriously. She acts as parent; constantly teaching the kids lessons about life and race. She serves as a bridge for Jem and Scout between the white and black communities....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird, mothers,] 1052 words
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The Positive Impact of Atticus, Calpurnia and Aunt Alexandra on Scout in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - The novel to Kill a Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee, is the story of an unfortunate society, where people are greatly affected by poverty due to the Great Depression. The story is based on a narration by Scout Finch, who describes her family and her town, Maycomb. Scout and her brother, Jem, are also introduced to other children, and they share stories and fantasies regarding a mystery man, Boo Radley, who lives in their neighborhood. Scout has a blunt nature, due to which she is an ill-mannered person who does not have any control over her anger and also shows no patience....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird] 1027 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Harper Lee has incorporated the representation of her most meaningful statement in the title of her novel, To Kill A Mockingbird. The many points of discussion which surface in Lee's book would certainly have partially submerged the parallel she created between Tom Robinson and the mockingbird. In any classic novel such as To Kill A Mockingbird, the myriad differences in thinking between readers allow for many different interpretations. The author of such a work, however, must constantly make decisions concerning the best ways to fulfill his or her purpose in writing; Harper Lee decided that the symbol of the mockingbird was not displayed prominently enough, and so made it the crux of her n...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 630 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird: An Analysis of Discrimination - To Kill a Mockingbird: An Analysis of Discrimination The most important theme of the 1960 Pulitzer Prize winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird is author Harper Lee’s tenacious exploration of the moral nature of people. Lee tenaciously explores the moral nature of human beings, especially the struggle in every human soul between discrimination and tolerance. The novel is very effective in not only revealing prejudice, but in examining the nature of prejudice, how it works, and its consequences....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
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To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - At the beginning of the novel, Scout is an innocent, good-hearted five-year-old child who has no experience with the evils of the world. As the novel progresses, Scout has her first contact with evil in the form of racial prejudice, and the basic development of her character is governed by the question of whether she will emerge from that contact with her conscience and optimism intact or whether she will be bruised, hurt, or destroyed like Boo Radley and Tom Robinson. Thanks to Atticus's wisdom, Scout learns that though humanity has a great capacity for evil, it also has a great capacity for good, and that the evil can often be mitigated if one approaches others with an outlook of sympathy...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 2644 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - The book, To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is a timeless classic about the coming of age of a small southern town and it’s people. The book follows Jem and Scout, two siblings living in the 1930’s in a small southern town. Their father, Atticus, is a lawyer who is hired to defend a black man who is accused of rape. The children watch the town and the trial change and grow. Atticus loses the trial and Tom Robinson, the man who is being accused of rape gets killed by prison guards. The whole town is in an uproar....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 719 words
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Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is Still Valuable in Modern Times - Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is one of the most revered novels in modern history. It is a story which makes use of powerful language and plot devices, as well as its use of highly detailed character development, to convey a variety of themes to readers, with the most prevalent ones including racial and social injustice, social life, class, discrimination, human nature and personal morals and beliefs. The titular quote, “... it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird”, also presents a significant theme in the novel: innocence and morality....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1381 words
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Atticus once said You never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them - Examine characters and relationships in to kill a mockingbird, in order to illustrate this maxim. TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD Atticus once said "You never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them" Examine characters and relationships in to kill a mockingbird, in order to illustrate this maxim. I think Atticus is trying to say that you never really know a man until you step in his shoes and do what he does....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays] 1382 words
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Racism, Sexism and Socioeconomic Prejudice in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird - People are not born prejudiced. “It is something that is learned". It can be learned in the same way other attitudes and values are learned, primarily through association, reinforcement and modeling. For example, children may learn to associate a particular ethnic group with poverty, crime, violence and other negative things” (2006 Anti-Defamation League). Also, prejudice in “children may be reinforced by listening to derogatory ethnic jokes, especially when others laugh along or think they're cool”....   [tags: to kill a mockingbird, argumentative, persuasive]
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