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Your search returned over 400 essays for "jane eyre"
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Jane Eyre: The Freedom of Love - Parallel to many of the great feministic novels throughout literary history, Jane Eyre is a story about the quest for authentic love. However, Jane Eyre is unique and separate from other romantic pieces, in that it is also about a woman searching for a sense of self-worth through achieving a degree of independence. Orphaned and dismissed at an early age, Jane was born into a modest lifestyle that was characterized by a form of oppressive servitude of which she had no autonomy. She was busy spending much of her adolescent years locked in chains, both imaginary and real, as well as catering to the needs of her peers....   [tags: Jane Eyre] 1836 words
(5.2 pages)
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Jane Eyre: Sympathy for Jane - How does Brontë create sympathy for the character of Jane in her novel, ‘Jane Eyre’. In the novel, ‘Jane Eyre’ Charlotte Brontë focuses on the life of Jane, an unwanted orphan who can’t do anything right in the eyes of her aunt. When she is about nine she is sent to Lowood Institute where she is also treated as inferior by Mr Brocklehurst. Although Jane is treated so cruelly and unfairly all her life she proves everyone wrong in the end by making something of herself. There are many parts of the book where we feel sympathy for Jane....   [tags: Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë] 809 words
(2.3 pages)
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Jane Eyre: Brontë's Mother Affected Jane - Would a person describe the personality and acts of their mothers as loving or nurturing or quite possibly witty with her words. When one thinks of a Mother, be it their own or another, one would usually describe them as caring, affectionate, protective; however, with her mother having died when she was a young age of five, Charlotte Brontë never had the chance to understand how essential those traits were to a child and grew up under the care and teachings of her father; which was what helped lead to her strong and virtuous independence: the lack of a mother's love and guide....   [tags: Jane Eyre]
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894 words
(2.6 pages)
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Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte - Throughout history the idea of the hero or heroine has changed, but some common attributes remain. The hero claims Bill Butler: “is an archetypal figure, a paradigm who bears the possibilities of life, courage, love – the indefinable’s which themselves define our human lives” . In his seminal work The Hero with a Thousand Faces, Joseph Campbell states that the hero: “a personage of exceptional gifts” is “the man or woman who has been able to battle past his personal and local historical limitations to the generally valid, normally human forms” ....   [tags: Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte] 1749 words
(5 pages)
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Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte - Humans learn from severe situations. Being a stranger in a harsh environment forces humanity to open to new capabilities, and learning from these hardships makes a person prepared for life's final exam. "Jane Eyre", by Charlotte Bronte is a picaresque that revolves around a girl name Jane. Bronte places Jane at Marsh End because she wanted her to see the nature of the world and to show the reader that life comes with surprises. After rising from this fall, she arrives at Moor House where her skills she learned at Marsh End are tested....   [tags: Jane Eyre Literary Analysis]
:: 1 Works Cited
1022 words
(2.9 pages)
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Jane Eyre's Development With Characterization - Two major men teach Jane to appreciate the complexities of her emotions and passions for life: Mr. Rochester and St. John. Both are antithesis of each other but both help Jane blossom into a woman with morals and ideals. With Mr. Rochester, she thrives in Thornfield’s environment where she does not need to suppress her passion and responds naturally to Rochester’s strong fervor. Because she did not receive proper moral schooling as a child, she did not know how to control her emotions. This problem is solved when Rochester fully exploits Jane’s weakness to his advantage by constantly making her feel jealous and inferior....   [tags: Jane Eyre] 1084 words
(3.1 pages)
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Finding the Balance of Love and Freedom in Jane Eyre - Similar to many of the great feministic novels of its time, Jane Eyre purely emerges as a story focused on the quest for love. The novel’s protagonist, Jane, searches not only for the romantic side of love, but ultimately for a sense of self-worth and independence. Set in the overlapping times of the Victorian and Gothic periods, the novel touches upon both women’s supposed rights, and their inner struggle for liberty. Orphaned at an early age, Jane was born into a modest lifestyle, without any major parent roles to guide her through life’s obstacles....   [tags: Jane Eyre] 1343 words
(3.8 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Dangers of Secrets In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, the characters come to learn that secrets do more harm than good through Edward Rochester’s secrecy after the fire in his room, Mrs. Reed not telling her about the letter from her uncle, and Edward Rochester’s secret marriage with Bertha. First, Rochester, who really knows what happened during the fire in his room, refuses to tell Jane the full truth so as to not hurt her. Secondly, Mrs. Reed and Jane do not have the best relationship; the hiding of the letter only strains this relationship further....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Jane Eyre, Characters]
:: 1 Works Cited
912 words
(2.6 pages)
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Oppression, Suffering, and Poverty of Men in Jane Eyre - The novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë, depicts the coming of age of a woman who encounters great hardships, obstacles, and heartbreak. During the Victorian era women were subordinate to men and often times lacked the same opportunities and privileges that society and the family structure gave to men. Although society and the family structure of the Victorian era treated men and women differently, men were also oppressed, experienced suffering, and had to overcome poverty, but due to the masculinity that men were forced to portray during the era often times the hardships of men have been overlooked when analyzing the men in Jane Eyre....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1426 words
(4.1 pages)
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Sympathy for the Character in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre - In Charlotte Brontë’s ‘Jane Eyre’, Jane instantly manages to make the reader empathise with her character. The way in which Brontë evokes this sympathy is by using a number of different methods: characterisation, the way in which the hierarchy of the characters is displayed, both physically and metaphorically; intricate choice of language, for example romanticising certain parts of the book to show intimacy between the characters and the reader; setting is also used to create sympathy for example the use of pathetic fallacy, is manipulated in conjunction with Jane’s mood or significance; narrative voices and the use of first person views throughout the entire book, create a negative semantic...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 2271 words
(6.5 pages)
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Jane Eyre - “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will.” (Bronte, Jane Eyre). This quote expresses Charlotte’s beliefs on women’s equalities. Charlotte Bronte was born in 1816. She was one of six children and lived in Yorkshire County England. She first worked as a governess in the Sidewick family then in the White family for only nine months. Charlotte wanted more for herself, and none of her jobs satisfied her ambitions. When she moved back home, she discovered her sister, Emily’s, poetry and decided to publish a selection of the poems all three sisters wrote....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1313 words
(3.8 pages)
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Jane Eyre - How can a girl, who started out with nothing, blossom into a well educated, generous, blissful woman. Well, in Jane Eyre, the main character overcomes all obstacles thrown at her and makes a great life for herself. From a miserable, orphaned young girl to a happily married, well educated woman, Jane Eyre transforms immensely throughout the novel. Through her many experiences in essential locations, she grows significantly at Gateshead, Lowood School, Thornfield, Marsh End, and Ferndean. The novel begins at Gateshead where Jane is a young, ten year old, orphaned child who is miserable and unwanted by her aunt and cousins....   [tags: Jane Eyre eSSAYS] 2408 words
(6.9 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte Critiques Victorian Culture in Jane Eyre - “Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.” Mary Shelley, in addition to the direct interpretation, suggests with this declaration that not only are humans resistant to and resentful of change, but so too are the societies in which they live, especially when the social order is directly challenged. This natural tendency causes change to occur slowly in societies after years of different ‘radicals’ pushing for transformation. Their critiques, especially in the beginning, are received with scorn and contempt....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1804 words
(5.2 pages)
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Distrust and Pain in Secrets: Jane Eyre - In the book Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, secrets cause much distrust aimed at the secret holder and pain to the ones either holding or discovering the secret with examples found in secrets like those of Rochester really being the gypsy, Jane's secret reading spot, Mrs. Reed keeping the letter from Jane, and Mr. Rochester's wife in the attic. When Mr. Rochester is disguised as the gypsy and tells the ladies these mysterious fortunes, it in cases hurts some mentally, but more importantly in Jane's case it leads to distrust of Mr....   [tags: Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte, Literary Analysis]
:: 1 Works Cited
1078 words
(3.1 pages)
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Wealth in Jane Eyre and Great Expectations - To many material wealth is the epitome of mankind’s earthly desires. With wealth comes money, possessions, a promise of freedom from social constraints and the ability to pursue your dreams. However, the influence it has on a person’s character can be a stark reminder of what the misuse of wealth can ultimately lead to. In both Great Expectations by Charles Dickens and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte the corrupting nature of monetary wealth is displayed through the lives of multiple characters. It is easy to see that a preoccupation with money blinds people to the prosperity that stands before them and can lead them down roads that end with nothing more than loneliness, misery or even death....   [tags: jane eyre, bronte, great expectations, dickens, co]
:: 2 Works Cited
970 words
(2.8 pages)
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Criticisms of Jane Eyre - Criticisms of Jane Eyre The major criticisms of the novel in question to be the melodrama used by the author and the wickedness of character shown in Jane and Mr. Rochester. While most critics admired the style of writing and truth of character portrayal, they did not admire the improbability of circumstances or the characters portrayed. Elizabeth Rigby (later Lady Eastlake) was probably the harshest critic, calling Jane Eyre “the personification of an unregenerate and undisciplined spirit.” Rigby strongly believed that, while Jane was portrayed with a great degree of accuracy, she was herself a flawed person....   [tags: Jane Eyre]
:: 8 Works Cited
1608 words
(4.6 pages)
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Fire and Water Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre" - Fire is the process in which materials ignite and combine with oxygen to give off heat, light, and flames. Likewise, water is composed of H20 molecules and acts as a counter to fire by possessing the ability to extinguish it. However, in literary terms, fire is mostly related to passion while water usually represents reason and calmness. Both elements are considered unique because of the ability to destroy and give life. Water can be directly related to life since it is an essential element for survival and makes up most of a human’s body....   [tags: imagery, Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre,] 667 words
(1.9 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Victories of Jane Eyre - The Victories of Jane Eyre All people live by their own codes of conduct. Everyone, be they male or female, young or old, has their own sets of values, which they adhere to and which are unchanging even in the face of personal or societal pressures and conflicts to give them up. In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane is tempted many times to acquiesce to others' wishes and, thereby, give up her own moral standards and beliefs. Yet Jane remains steadfast in adhering to her personal code of conduct, namely to maintain feelings of high self-esteem, not to let herself be used and abused by others, and never to give up her religious convictions....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 927 words
(2.6 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre and I - Jane Eyre and I For me reading Jane Eyre was no mere intellectual exercise; it was an experience which served to reflect a mirror-image of what I am. Jane's rainbows and cobwebs are mine; we are one. I think that she would be as engrossed in reading an account of my life as I was in reading hers. I see her reading Ruth Rosen on a stormy night, covers up to her chin, with candlelight flickering and wind whistling across the heath. I read hers tucked into bed, as wind rattled the windows and bellowed through the caverns of Trump Village....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1074 words
(3.1 pages)
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Comparing Wide Sargasso Sea and Jane Eyre - Authors, Jean Rhys and Charlotte Bronte constructed their novels in completely different time periods and came from different influences in writing. Jean Rhys’s fiction book, Wide Sargasso Sea is an interesting relation to Jane Eyre. The female character of Jane Eyre forms into a furiously, passionate, independent young woman. The female character of Jean Rhys’s illustration is a character that Jane will know further on as Rochester’s crazy wife who is bolted in an attic. Jean Rhys further studies this character, where as Charlotte Bronte approved that it was left explained (Thorpe 175)....   [tags: Wide Sargasso Sea, Jane Eyre]
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1321 words
(3.8 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre: Jane Eyre's Artwork - Jane Eyre's Artwork          "Each picture told a story; mysterious often to my undeveloped understanding and imperfect feelings, yet ever profoundly interesting." --Jane Eyre (9)   There is something extraordinary and spiritual about Jane Eyre's artwork. In her story, Jane's solitary pastime sometimes operates as an outlet of past or present pain, and often offers her a chance to deal with unpleasant memories and emotions. Jane's art transcends her isolation by bringing her into contact with others who see it; it serves as a bridge over the chasm between her desire to be alone and her need for companionship, which is demonstrated by key scenes in the novel that include a viewing of...   [tags: Essays Jane Eyre]
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1820 words
(5.2 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Character of Jane Eyre - The Character of Jane Eyre          What we learn of the central character is considerable. Throughout the novel her dealings with those around her reveal her characteristics. As a child at Gateshead Hall we see that she is impulsive, often alarmingly so, but that she also can be sullen and withdrawn. Thse around her do not find her an easy child - she gives very little of herself away, especially to the Reed family, although there is a slight intimacy with the servant, Bessie. She is intelligent and precocious, preferring the make believe world of books to the harsh and often unsympathetic world of reality....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 881 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Purpose of Sati in Jane Eyre - The general image of Sati and the reasoning that surrounded it filled the Western imagination with repulsion as well as admiration. In the nineteenth century, Westerners publishing diaries of their travels always included their experiences when viewing Sati. Although these travelers, usually men, watched with horror, they also admired the courage and the dignity of the women involved (Hawley 3). What was known in England of Sati was from the accounts of the colonial officials and travelers who witnessed it (Courtright 28)....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 2078 words
(5.9 pages)
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The Language of Slavery in Jane Eyre - While Bronte’s novel is a story of one woman’s rise from dependant, patriarchal oppression to financial stability and emotional liberation, the narration of that story is often turns to the figurative representation of slavery. Bronte applies the metaphor of slavery to the domestic trials facing British women at the time. Time and again her narrative language turns to this device in order to draw parallels between slavery and other vehicles of oppression, namely gender and class. Just as the majority of issues in the novel are two-sided, the implications of these parallels are two-sided as well....   [tags: Jane Eyre Bronte Papers]
:: 4 Works Cited
2611 words
(7.5 pages)
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Poverty and Charity in Jane Eyre - Poverty and Charity in Jane Eyre When Jane Eyre resided at Gateshead Hall, under the care of her aunt, Mrs. Reed, she yearned for a change. The treatment that she received at Gateshead Hall was cruel, unjust, and most importantly, lacked nurture. Jane wanted to escape Gateshead Hall and enter into a school. The school that was imposed upon Jane was Lowood Institution. Through her eight year stay at Lowood, Jane learned how to control her frustrations and how to submit to authority. After leaving Lowood Institution and taking the occupation as governess at Thornfield Hall, Jane realized that her experiences at Gateshead Hall and Lowood Institution had deeply rooted themselves into her perso...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1140 words
(3.3 pages)
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Jane Eyre - Woman as Demon - Jane Eyre - Woman as Demon Missing Works Cited Women in Victorian literature often came to be seen as "the other" or in more direct terms, as somehow demonized. This is certainly true in Jane Eyre. Bertha Mason, Rochester's mad wife, is the epitome of the demon in the attic. By virtue of being the first wife she is in continually compared to Jane. Although there are parallels in plot and language between the two women, they are completely different people. In addition, Bronte also depicts other women throughout the novel as something to be feared....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1959 words
(5.6 pages)
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Religion and Evangelicalism in Jane Eyre - Religion and Evangelicalism in Jane Eyre   When orphans of the nineteenth century were able to receive an education, it usually came from a charity instution. These charity institutions were founded on a basis of religion. This is the case in Jane Eyre for Mr. Brocklehurst is a clergyman who owns and overlooks the Institution that Jane became a part of. Jane's conversation with the newly met Helen Burns exposes this to the reader. Jane asks the question, "Who was Naomi Brocklehurst?" The reader finds out that she was the lady who built the new part of the Institution....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
853 words
(2.4 pages)
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Passion and Practicality of Jane Eyre - Passion and Practicality of Jane Eyre        Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre is a coming-of-age story about an unconventional woman's development within a society of strict rules and expectations. At pivotal moments in Jane's life, she makes choices which are influenced by her emotions and/or her reason. Through the results of those choices, Jane learns to balance passion and practicality to achieve true happiness.   Jane is a spirited woman, and her emotions give her a strength of character that is unusual for a female heroine of this period....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
1861 words
(5.3 pages)
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The Oxford Movement and Jane Eyre - The Oxford Movement and Jane Eyre   The Victorian period from the mid to late 1800's was a time of internal religious turmoil for England. In the Anglican Church there were many different groups competing to define the doctrine and practice of the national religion. The church was politically divided in three general categories following: the High Church, which was the most conservative; the Middle, or Broad Church, which was more liberal; and the Low Church, which was the Evangelical wing of the Anglican Church....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1449 words
(4.1 pages)
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Travel as Experience in Jane Eyre - Travel as Experience in Jane Eyre In his essay "The Progress of Error" William Cowper writes: Returning he proclaims by many a grace, By shrugs and strange contortions of his face, How much a dunce, that has been sent to roam, Excels a dunce, that has been kept at home. (Buzard 99) In the novel, we are presented with the tale of Jane Eyre and her travels around the English countryside. What she has seen and done are not considered extraordinary but rather common to a woman of her social standing....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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1319 words
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Portrayals of Prostitution in Jane Eyre - Portrayals of Prostitution in Jane Eyre   Bronte paints many parallels between the characters in the novel and the trade of prostitution. One of the main characters that Bronte attributes poverty to is the character of Jane. Jane’s poverty is intrinsically important to the plot of the novel because Bronte uses Jane’s poverty to allow the reader to picture Jane as a virtuous woman, such as when Jane flees from Thornfield to escape the entrapment of Rochester. The reader is urged to feel sympathy for Jane as she adheres to her strict, virtuous moral codes and does not allow herself to succumb to temptation....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
2147 words
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Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë - Jane Eyre Jane Eyre, a classic Victorian novel by Charlotte Brontë, is regarded as one of the finest novels in English literature. The main character, Jane Eyre, demonstrates a strong need to be herself, a young girl trying to retain all the individuality possible for a dependent of her time. Although this effort guides her to a passionate and impulsive nature, Jane is still willing to accept change in her life knowing it may not always seem the most pleasant. Her tolerance of change begins very early in the novel and helps her in developing a strong sense of independence....   [tags: Charlotte Brontë Jane Eyre] 1641 words
(4.7 pages)
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Substitute Mothers in Jane Eyre - Substitute Mothers in Jane Eyre   In Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, Jane is an orphan who is often mistreated by the family and other people who surround her. Faced with constant abuse from her aunt and her cousins, Jane at a young age questions the treatment she receives: "All John Reed’s violent tyrannies, all his sister’s proud indifference, all his mother’s aversion, all the servants’ partiality, turned up in my disturbed mind like a dark deposit in a turbid well. Why was I always suffering, always brow-beaten, always accused, forever condemned?" (27; ch....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
2148 words
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Bird Imagery in Jane Eyre - In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte uses many types of imagery to provide understanding of the characters and also to express reoccurring themes in the novel. Through bird imagery specifically, we are able to see Jane develop from a small, unhappy child into a mature and satisfied young woman. "The familiarity and transcendence of birds have given them a wider range of meaning and symbol in literature than any other animal. The resemblance of their activities to common patterns of human behavior makes them exceptionally suitable for anthropomorphic imagery that links man to the common forms of nature" (Lutwack xii)....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
2720 words
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Jane Eyre and Control Dramas - Jane Eyre and Control Dramas       There are particular powers that drive lives in their respective directions.  Some are internal, but the majority are external.  The external propellers are forces caused by the environment of an individual.  Environmental influences include but are not limited to  geographical and climatic forces.  In addition, there are societal forces such as the "control drama." Control dramas have been introduced by the best selling author James Redfield as a way to evaluate situations through behavioral classifications.  Jane Eyre is an excellent example of how control dramas affect the individual.  In order to fully understand why Jane acts as she does, it is par...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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1630 words
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The Inspirational Jane Eyre - The Inspirational Jane Eyre Jane Eyre is the main character in the novel named Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. She is but a fictional character, and in our hearts she will stay. This incredible lady in her beloved story has carried on through the centuries to inspire all its readers. Jane is a cherished woman with whom everyone can find a bit of themselves in. The captivating character of Jane Eyre was created in the mid 1800's by an awe-inspiring writer by the name of Charlotte Bronte....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 480 words
(1.4 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - There are many stages throughout the book in which the reader can feel sympathy for Jane Eyre; these include when she is locked in the Red Room, when Helen Burns dies at Lowood, and when she and Mr. Rochester are married the first time. The situation when Jane in locked in the Red Room occurs because she has retaliated against John Reed hitting her and the fact that she is being punished for doing so. The mere fact that she is being locked in the Red Room can already accumulate sympathy within the reader because she is seemingly being very unfairly punished whereas her cousin John has attacked her already and managed to escape any punishment whatsoever....   [tags: Bronte Jane Eyre] 1347 words
(3.8 pages)
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Quakerism in Jane Eyre - Quakerism in Jane Eyre   Quakerism is mentioned many times in Jane Eyre. Beyond the explicit descriptions of Quaker-like appearances or behaviors, many parts of Quaker lifestyle are also used in a less obvious manner in Jane Eyre. Quakerism would have been known in the Yorkshire moors where Charlotte Bronte grew up and near where Jane Eyre lived, especially since that is where the religion began (Moglen 19; Barbour and Frost 27). As a more moderate approach to denying the self than Evangelicalism, Quakerism seems to be embraced in the novel....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
968 words
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte's, Jane Eyre, a story of an unfortunate you who's morals and self-respect continue to fluctuate as she matures. Jane Eyre begins her life in the wrong place at the wrong time. During the novel, Jane endures love, hate and friendship, though maturity allows her to forgive. Settings surrounding Jane's life alter her own ideas of self-acceptance, her actions taken to release herself from certain settings have effect on her. In the first few chapters, Bronte establishes Jane's character as a young girl who is the object of hatred from her cousins and aunt....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre] 1771 words
(5.1 pages)
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Orphans in Jane Eyre - Orphans in Jane Eyre Jane, one of the orphans in the novel Jane Eyre, is portrayed as the victim of charity. She is also seen in others' eyes as something less or lower than themselves. Orphans are seen by wealthy people as children who are in need of their charity, and also who lack in morals, ambition, and culture. Jane tells about how she has no family; her mother and her father had the typhus fever, and "both died within a month of each other" (58; ch. 3). As if this is not bad enough, she is also excluded from being a part of the Reed family:   Me, [Mrs....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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1519 words
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The Bluebeard Reference in Jane Eyre - The Bluebeard Reference in Jane Eyre   Within Jane Eyre lies an explicit reference to the tale of Bluebeard. When first exploring the dark hall of Thornfield’s third floor Jane tells us, "I lingered in the long passage to which this led [. . .] with only one little window at the far end, and looking, with its two rows of small black doors all shut, like a corridor in some Bluebeard’s castle" (114; ch. 11). This allusion is not a casual one, for the plot of Jane Eyre has much in common with the tale of Bluebeard....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays]
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1818 words
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Jane Eyre as an Independent Woman - Jane Eyre as an Independent Woman Jane Eyre was probably the most shocking and controversial novel of it’s time. Not only was it almost unheard of for a readable novel to be written by a woman, but the views and opinions expressed by the character of Jane Eyre were unthinkable and before their time. In the eighteenth century, when Queen Victoria was at the height of her reigning day, People were far more reserved that the people of today. People were much more prudish and kept themselves to themselves....   [tags: Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte Essays] 1908 words
(5.5 pages)
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Reactions to Patriarchal Oppression by Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason - Reactions to Patriarchal Oppression by Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason Missing Works Cited   Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason are both oppressed by the British patriarchal system were men are the makers, interpreters, and enforcers of social and political rules. However, these two women differ greatly in the ways that they accept and cope with the reality of their place in society, and it is these differences that ultimately determine their fate. Jane Eyre follows the rules. Although she initially revolts against what she believes to be unfair restrictions at Gateshead and Lowood, she soon discovers that rebellion carries a high price and, over time, she learns to modify her behavior to conform to so...   [tags: Jane Eyre] 3815 words
(10.9 pages)
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Biblical Allusions in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Biblical Allusions in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre One Sunday evening, shortly after Jane arrives at Lowood School, she is forced to recite the sixth chapter of St. Matthew as part of the daily lesson (70; ch. 7). This chapter in Matthew states, Therefore take no thought, saying, What shall we eat. or, What shall we drink or, Wherewithal shall we be clothed. / (For after all these things do the Gentiles seek:) for your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of all these things. / But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you....   [tags: Jane Eyre]
:: 3 Works Cited
1000 words
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Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte In this essay I am going to analyse the novel ‘Jane Eyre’ by Charlotte Bronte. Jane is an orphaned child sent to live with her aunt and uncle. Her uncle was her last remaining blood relative and, since he died, she has been severely neglected. She is treated like a slave and is bullied by her cousins. She was locked in a room in which her uncle died in and thought that she saw a ghost of him and fainted. The owner of Lowood boarding school comes to talk to Mrs Reed about her attending the school and Mrs Reed in spite of Jane gives him false information about Jane, telling him that she is a liar....   [tags: Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte Essays] 1418 words
(4.1 pages)
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Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte - Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre, a novel about an English woman’s struggles told through the writing of Charlotte Brontë, has filled its audience with thoughts of hope, love, and deception for many years. These thoughts surround people, not just women, everyday, as if an endless cycle from birth to death. As men and women fall further into this spiral of life they begin to find their true beings along with the qualities of others. This spiral then turns into a web of conflicts as the passenger of life proceeds and often these conflicts are caused by those sought out to be guides through the journey of life but merely are spiders building a magnificent web to catch its prey....   [tags: Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte Essays] 2068 words
(5.9 pages)
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Miss Temple's Influence on Jane Eyre - Miss Temple's Influence on Jane Eyre "Jane Eyre" is set during the Victorian period, at a time where a women's role in society was restricted and class differences distinct. A job as a governess was one of the only few respectable positions available to the educated but impoverished single women. Not only is "Jane Eyre" a novel about one woman's journey through life, but Brontë also conveys to the reader the social injustices of the period, such as poverty, lack of universal education and sexual inequality....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 929 words
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Reflection on Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Reflection on Jane Eyre "That strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit." This was the painful reaction of young Jane Eyre to her own horrifying ten-year-old reflection in the mirror . This reflection illustrates the harsh and fearful childhood of a strong-willed girl in the beginning of Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Bronte. Set in the mid-nineteenth century on the English countryside Jane Eyre tells the story of one orphan's troubled childhood and her yearning to belong to someone somewhere as she matures into an adult....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 621 words
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The Themes of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Themes of Jane Eyre In the beginning of Jane Eyre, Jane struggles against Bessie, the nurse at Gateshead Hall, and says, I resisted all the way: a new thing for me…"(Chapter 2).  This sentence foreshadows what will be an important theme of the rest of the book, that of female independence or rebelliousness. Jane is here resisting her unfair punishment, but throughout the novel she expresses her opinions on the state of women.  Tied to this theme is another of class and the resistance of the terms of one's class.  Spiritual and supernatural themes can also be traced throughout the novel....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1103 words
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The Maturation of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The overriding theme of Jane Eyre, is Jane's continual quest for love. Jane searches for love and acceptance through the five settings in which she lives: Gateshead, Lowood, Thornfield, Moor House, and Ferndean. Through these viewpoints, the maturation and self-recognition of Jane becomes evident, as well as traceable. It is not until Jane flees from Rochester and Thornfield, and spends time at Moor House, that her maturation to womanhood is complete. At this point, Jane is able to finally return to Rochester as an independent woman, fully aware of her desire to love, as well as to be loved....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays Bronte]
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Perfection and Darkness: Choice in Jane Eyre - Perfection and Darkness: Choice in Jane Eyre      When reading Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, I find myself cheering for Rochester. After finishing the book, I ask myself why Jane chooses Rochester over St. John. After all, Rochester has a "mad" wife, Bertha Mason, locked in the attic of Thornfield Hall at the same time that he is proposing marriage to Jane. He has a ward living with him, possibly the offspring of an illicit affair with a French dancer. He is arrogant, pushy, and basically ill-tempered....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Imagery in Jane Eyre     Charlotte Bronte wrote the novel Jane Eyre in the mid-eighteen hundreds. In her novel she expresses her views on many important factors present during this time including social problems such as race, class, gender, and the role of religion. Each of these factors affects the way that the protagonist, Jane Eyre, grows as a person. Throughout the novel Charlotte Bronte uses images and symbols that either influence or represent Jane's growth. Bronte uses a common imagery throughout the novel reflecting images of "fire and ice." She also uses symbols in Jane's life such as the red-room, from her childhood, and the character Bertha Mason Rochester, during her t...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Analysis of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Analysis of Jane Eyre In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte portrays one woman's desperate struggle to attain her identity in the mist of temptation, isolation, and impossible odds. Although she processes a strong soul she must fight not only the forces of passion and reason within herself ,but other's wills constantly imposed on her. In its first publication, it outraged many for its realistic portrayal of life during that time. Ultimately, the controversy of Bronte's novel lied in its realism, challenging the role of women, religion, and mortality in the Victorian society....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1190 words
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Violence in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Violence in Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte uses violence in several scenes throughout the novel. The violence in the novel is not fatal to anyone, it is just used to catch the readers eye. This novel consists of many emotional aspects. For example, the violence in the scene where Mr. Mason gets attacked. The attack really upsets Jane and Mr. Rochester. In the novel Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte uses several acts of violence to create suspense, mystery, and characterization. This scene is probably the best one to create the suspense of the novel....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 366 words
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Passion in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Passion in Jane Eyre It is believed that we are born with a predestined personality. Our spiritual individuality is just as much a product of our genetic makeup as the color of our skin or our eyes. With our soul firmly planted, we can then build upon this basis as we are educated of the world. The social climate and cultural atmosphere shape our personalities, however, it is the people in our lives who have the greatest influence. Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre reveals this idea by the development of the protagonist....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1216 words
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Christianity in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Christianity in Jane Eyre        Charlotte Bronte addresses the theme of Christianity in the novel Jane Eyre. Bronte states: "Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last" (35). In Jane Eyre, Bronte supports the theme that customary actions are not always moral through the conventional personalities of Mrs. Reed, Mr. Brocklehurst, and St. John Rivers.   The issue of class is prevalent in the novel. The novel begins in Gateshead Hall when Jane must seat herself away from her aunt and cousins because she does not know how to speak pleasantly to them....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Governess Relationships in Bronte's Jane Eyre - Governess Relationships in Bronte's Jane Eyre   The Victorian governess suffered socially because of her position. The relationship between her and others that were in her class was strained because of her financial situation. She often suffered from "status incongruity." The relationship between a governess and a gentleman was difficult because she was not his financial equal (Peterson 13). While the relationship was strained in her novel Jane Eyre, Bronte leads us to believe that it is not altogether impossible....   [tags: Jane Eyre essay]
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre "There was no possibility of taking a walk that day....I was glad of it; I never liked long walks, especially on chilly afternoons: dreadful to me was the coming home in the raw twilight, with nipped fingers and toes, and a heart saddened by the chidings of Bessie, the nurse, and humbled by the consciousness of my physical inferiority to Eliza, John, and Georgiana Reed." So goes the opening to the novel 'Jane Eyre' by Charlotte Bronte. We are immediately brought into the story; the scene has been set and feelings exposed....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays] 3045 words
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Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre 'Jane Eyre' was written in the mid-nineteenth century and is set during the Victorian period, at a time where a women's role in society was restrictive and repressive and class differences were distinct. A job as a governess was one of the only few respectable positions available to the educated but impoverished single women. Schools of the 19th century were strict, and they demanded much hard work and participation from the students, however, just the same, children of the time loved going to school....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays] 1696 words
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Role of Women in Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre represents the role of women in the Victorian era by giving the reader an insight into the lives of women from all social classes. Jane Eyre therefore represents figures of the Victorian time yet the character of Jane Eyre, herself, can be seen as very unconventional for the Victorian society. England, in the eighteenth century, was driven by class distinction and wealth. In the lower class there was always a desperate struggle to survive which contrasted to the life led by the upper class, socializing with people like themselves....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Woman Female Jane Eyre] 1506 words
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Jane Eyre as a Feminist Novel - Jane Eyre as a Feminist Novel A feminist is a person whose beliefs and behavior are based on feminism (belief in the social, political, and economic equality of the sexes). Jane Eyre is clearly a critique of assumptions about both gender and social class. It contains a strong feminist stance; it speaks to deep, timeless human urges and fears, using the principles of literature to chart the mind?s recesses. Thus, Jane Eyre is an epitome of femininity - a young independent individual steadfast in her morals and has strong Christian virtues, dominant, assertive and principled....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Feminism Essays] 1971 words
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Moral Issues in Shakespeare’s Othello, Bronte’s Jane Eyre and Shelley’s Frankenstein - The presentation of moral issues in Othello establishes that during the Renaissance period some writers challenged the traditional Elizabethan society. For instance, in Cinthio’s story Iago was a minor villain; however, Shakespeare transformed him into the Machiavellian that Is most memorable for his deception and downfall. Whereas, the presentation of moral issues in Frankenstein presents moral theory’s such as Unitarianism and the Theory of Natural Rights as inherent to which the characters face moral issues of their time....   [tags: Othello, Jane Eyre, Frankenstein]
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Christianity and Evangelism in Jane Eyre - Christianity and Evangelism in Jane Eyre There were great changes in the religious arena during the time of Victorian England. John Wesley had his warm heart experience, India had been opened to missionizing, and a Utilitarian and Evangelical shift had occurred. Charlotte Brontë would have felt the effects of these things, being a daughter of the clergy, and by simply being a daughter of the Victorian era. Her novel, Jane Eyre, serves as a reaction to Utilitarianism, and the protagonist Jane emerges as an Evangelical figure....   [tags: Religion Religious Biblical Jane Eyre Essays]
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Jane Eyre's Life - “In what way is social class preventing Jane Eyre of living a life of equality and freedom, and how is this related to feminism?” Jane Eyre lived in the time of the Victorian Era, which Queen Victoria reigned. The way of life of women in Victorian England has a great impact on how Jane was brought up. This is because of their system which “defined the role of a woman” and every woman had a customary routine for their respective class. If one were to take on the standards of another, it would be considered as a serious offense....   [tags: Jane Eyre Writer] 1029 words
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Laying the Last Minstrel in Jane Eyre - Laying the Last Minstrel in Jane Eyre To find one work quoted multiple times in a novel, as is the case in Jane Eyre with The Lay of the Last Minstrel by Sir Walter Scott, should suggest to a reader that this quoted work can serve to shed some light on the work in which it is found. In this case, Charlotte Brontë alluded to Scott’s work at appropriate moments in the novel, both because of similarities in the plots at those moments, but also, more importantly, because of the theme of The Lay of the Last Minstrel....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays]
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An Analysis of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - An Analysis of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre is presented in the Victorian Period of England. It is a novel which tells the story of a child's maturation into adulthood. Jane's developing personality has been shaped by her rough childhood. She has been influenced by many people and experiences. As a woman of her time, Jane has had to deal with the strain of physical appearance. This has a great effect on her mental thinking and decision making. Jane Eyre's cognitive and physical attributes have been affected by her environment throughout her life....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays]
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The Maturing of Jane in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Maturing of Jane in Jane Eyre When a caterpillar hatches from its mother's egg, it enters this world as an innocent, pure creature. As time passes by, it unwraps its cocoon and goes through metamorphosis. Once the caterpillar grows into a fully developed butterfly, it has lost its innocence and purity forever. Jane was an inexperienced caterpillar but her stay at Lowood and her challenging time at Thornfield with Mr. Rochester has changed her into an independent, matured butterfly....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 575 words
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Bertha as Jane's Alter Ego in Jane Eyre - Bertha as Jane's Alter Ego in Jane Eyre   "I resisted all the way," (chapter 2)  Jane says as she is borne away to be locked in the red-room of Gateshead, where she will experience a fit of rage that inevitably arises from her physical and emotional entrapment. Jane evinces her refusal to accept passively restrictive male standards as well as the female predilection towards anger early in the novel. That night in the red-room, Jane experiences a vehement anger that she describes as "oppressed" and "suffocated." From this impassioned rage Jane falls unconscious, and upon waking in the nursery, Jane finds herself prepared to challenge both the oppressive patriarchal society in whic...   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Masculinity in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Masculinity in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Throughout the novel 'Jane Eyre' we meet 5 male characters. Immediately we can notice that the number of female characters outweighs the number of male characters. It feels as though Brontë is trying to tell us that overall women will come out more influential and powerful than men. Indeed power is what our male characters have in common. Their power however alters from character to character. This is the common version of masculinity portrayed by Bront throughout 'Jane Eyre'....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre Essays] 1120 words
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The Self-confidence of Jane in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - In the Webster's online dictionary, self-confidence is defined as confidence in oneself and in one's powers and abilities. A famous quote by Jim Loehr says, "With confidence, you can reach truly amazing heights; Without confidence, even the simplest accomplishments are beyond your grasp." Confidence in yourself does not come without effort. One must believe in themselves, and not let someone change their beliefs. In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane shows self-confidence throughout the novel, by possessing a sense of self-worth, dignity, and a trust in God....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 601 words
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Rasselas in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Rasselas in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre   There are many instances in Jane Eyre where Charlotte Bronte uses or alludes to other literary works. One work in particular, Samuel Johnson’s fable, Rasselas, has important implications for the novel. Rasselas is the book Helen Burns is reading when Jane first encounters her at Lowood. Bronte did not choose this work at random. She was familiar with Johnson’s works, and she relied on the contemporary Victorian reader’s knowledge of it, as she clearly states the title rather than just alluding to it. A knowledge of Johnson’s famous work is especially important in understanding the relationship between Helen and Jane....   [tags: Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte Essays]
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Jane's Resilience to Events in Jane Eyre - Jane's Resilience to Events in Jane Eyre The novel Jane Eyre was written by Charlotte Bronte in the 1840’s. Put simply, it is the story of a woman who began her life with nothing but aspired, against the odds, to gain recognition and a better social status. Moreover, it is about her ability to cope with situations and make decisions that affect her life and others. Through these qualities it is possible to describe her as a heroine. This essay will aim to show how Bronte conveys Jane’s resilience – her ability to cope and repel suffering – to the audience....   [tags: Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte Literature Essays] 2589 words
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Construction of Love and Gender in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Construction of Love and Gender in Jane Eyre      Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte focuses primarily on love, specifically romantic love and it is the way in which Charlotte Bronte challenges 19th century socio-cultural views on gender and romance, as well as other discourses within the novel such as class and status that makes Jane Eyre successful.   The main discourse within Jane Eyre that impacts most greatly upon its feature, romantic love, is the societal classes of the time. This upper and lower class structure becomes evidently the basis of the novel Jane Eyre....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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The Powerful Opening of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Powerful Opening of Jane Eyre         The Bildungsroman, a novel that details the growth and development of a main character through several periods of life, began as a German genre in the seventeenth century, but by the mid eighteen hundreds it had become firmly established in England as well. Such important Victorian novels as Great Expectations, base themselves on this form, which continues as an important literary sub-genre even today. The Bildungsroman typically told the story of a man growing from boyhood to adulthood....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre      In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë clearly demonstrates the relationship between sexuality and morality in Victorian society through the character of Bertha Mason, the daughter of a West Indian planter and Rochester's first wife. Rochester recklessly married Bertha in his youth, and when it was discovered shortly after the marriage that Bertha was sexually promiscuous, Rochester locked her away. Bertha is called a "maniac" and is characterized as insane....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Jane Eyre's Childhood as a Precedent for All the Trouble - Jane Eyre's Childhood as a Precedent for All the Trouble Jane Eyre's literary success of the time has been cheaply commercialized. In other words, Bronte's novel never got the appreciation it deserved, in the areas it deserved. Many 19th century critics merely assigned literary themes to their reviews to "get it over with". Critics commended Jane Eyre for everything from its themes to its form. However, their surface examinations amount to nothing without careful consideration of the deeper underlying background in Jane's life where their hasty principles originate....   [tags: Emily Bronte Jane Eyre] 1795 words
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The Opening Chapters in Great Expectations and Jane Eyre - How effective are the opening chapters in Great Expectations and Jane Eyre. In my essay i will be explaining and comparing the opening paragraphs of "Great Expectations" ang "Jane Eyre". The author of "Great Expectations" is Charles Dickens (1812-70). Dickens was a middle class man who was well known and wealthy. He had his own magazine, called "All the year round", in which he published "Great Expectations" over a period of 59 weeks; one chapter a week was published his magazine. He wrote it in 1860 and it was published between December 1860 and August 1861....   [tags: Great Expectations Jane Eyre] 2400 words
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Deceit and Dishonesty in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Jane Eyre:  The Theme of Deceit and Dishonesty "'The marriage can not go on: I declare the existence of an impediment'" (306).   Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, is the story of an orphaned girl who is sent to live at Gateshead Hall with Mrs. Reed and her three cousins, whom Jane doesn't get along with. At the age of ten, Mrs. Reed sends Jane away to Lowood Institution, an all girls' school, where she spends the next eight years of her life. At the age of eighteen, Jane leaves Lowood and accepts the position as governess at Thornfield Hall....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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Perspectives of Marriage in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Perspectives of Marriage in Jane Eyre Many novels speak of love and indulging in passion, but few speak of the dynamics that actually make a marriage work. Jane Eyre is one of these novels. It doesn't display the fleeing passions of a Romeo and Juliet. This is due entirely to Bronte's views on marriage and love. The first exception to the traditional couple the reader is shown is Rochester's marriage to Bertha. This example shows the consequences of indulging in passion. The opposite side is shown through another unlikely would-be couple, Rosamund and St....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 656 words
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Narration and Conversation in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Narration and Conversation in Jane Eyre        Throughout her life, Jane Eyre, the heroine of the novel by Charlotte Bronte, relies heavily on language and story-telling to communicate her thoughts and emotions. Not only are good story-telling skills important to Jane Eyre as a the narrator, but they are also important to Jane Eyre as a character in her own novel. From the beginning of the novel, we learn of Jane's love of books -- "each picture told a story" (40) -- and of her talent for telling her own stories....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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