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Your search returned 200 essays for "iliad":
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The Epic Education of Achilles in Homer's The Iliad - The Epic Education of Achilles in Homer's The Iliad Dr. Fly’s comments: This paper was well-organized and developed; the thesis was argued in a logical fashion; material from primary and secondary sources was well-documented and integrated smoothly into the text; the author’s style was clear, with varied and sophisticated sentence structures and concrete vocabulary; and the paper demonstrated excellent command of grammar and mechanics.   Within the annals of epic literature, the celebrated role of "epic hero" has always been present, heralding the poem's themes through the actions of a single, extraordinary protagonist....   [tags: Iliad Essays]
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2275 words
(6.5 pages)
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Homer’s Iliad - The Shield of Achilles - Homer’s Iliad - The Shield of Achilles Homer devotes the final passages of Book 18 of The Iliad to the description of the shield of Achilles. Only a quarter of the description concerns warfare, the essential grist of the epic. Instead, the bulk of the description presents a peaceful society and rural idylls, a curious choice for the most ferocious warrior of the Greeks, and an odd thing for both armies to fear. A narrative emerges from the scenes of the shield, and it is this that fits Achilles and repulses everyone else....   [tags: Iliad essays]
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1597 words
(4.6 pages)
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Importance of Male Relationships in Homer's Iliad - Importance of Male Relationships in Homer's Iliad       The most significant relationship in Homer's Iliad is the friendship between Achilles and Patroclus. Other male relationships play major roles in the epic and can be directly related to that of Achilles and Patroclus. The brotherhood of Agamemnon and Menelaos, and of Hector and Paris demonstrate their loyalty. They fight because of love for each other throughout the war. Achilles, however, is not driven to fight or even bother with the war until his friendship with Patroclus is broken....   [tags: Iliad essays]
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1628 words
(4.7 pages)
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Immense Heroism in Homer’s Iliad - Immense Heroism in Homer’s Iliad The Iliad opens with "the anger of Peleus' son, Achilleus," (1.1) and closes with the "burial of Hektor, breaker of horses" (24.804).1 The bracketing of the poem with descriptions of these two men suggests both their importance and their connection to one another. They lead parallel lives as the top fighters in their respective armies, and, as the poem progresses, their lives and deaths become more and more closely linked. They each struggle to fulfill the heroic ideal, and they both grapple with temptations that lure them away from heroism....   [tags: Iliad essays] 1673 words
(4.8 pages)
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The Paradox of Heroism in Homer’s Iliad - The Paradox of Heroism in Homer’s Iliad The Iliad presents a full range of valorous warriors: the Achaians Diomedes, Odysseus, and the Aiantes; the Trojans Sarpedon, Aeneas, and Glaukos. These and many others are Homer’s models of virtue in arms. Excelling all of them, however, are the epic’s two central characters, Achilleus, the son of Peleus and, Hector, the son of Priam. In these two, one finds the physical strength, intense determination, and strenuous drive that give them first place within their respective armies....   [tags: Iliad essays]
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1960 words
(5.6 pages)
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Essay on Diomedes, the True Hero of Homer’s Iliad - Diomedes, the True Hero of The Iliad In The Iliad, written in a 3rd person omniscient point of view, Homer gives a very serious account of the tenth and last year of the Trojan War.  It was in Homer's account that the very idea of becoming a legendary hero reached its pinnacle; the choice of the better hero was not decided on the events they participated in, but rather by their characteristics.  The ancient Greeks had strict criteria for individuals to follow if they were to be seen as heroes....   [tags: Iliad essays]
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1549 words
(4.4 pages)
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Essay on Hector as the Ideal Homeric Man of Homer's Iliad - Hector as the Ideal Homeric Man of Homer's Iliad        Homer's Iliad enthralls readers with its’ valiant heroes who fight for the glory of Greece. The Iliad, however, is not just a story of war; it is also a story of individuals. Through the characters' words and actions, Homer paints portraits of petulant Achilles and vain Agamemnon, doomed Paris and Helen, loyal Patroclus, tragic Priam, versatile Odysseus, and the whole cast of Gods. Ironically, the most complete character in the epic is Hector, enemy hero, and Prince of Troy....   [tags: Iliad essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1371 words
(3.9 pages)
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Homer’s Iliad – Searching for Meaning in Tragedy - Homer’s Iliad – Searching for Meaning in Tragedy The past does not inevitably exist in the present. The creative processes of remembering and telling stories allow our histories to remain with us. Memory and story negate the possibility of existing independently of the past by connecting humans across time to the actions and value systems of their predecessors. Humans are forced to live amidst and confront a complex and multi-dimensional reality in which their every action affects people and events outside of their immediate context....   [tags: Iliad essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1807 words
(5.2 pages)
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Essay on Achilles as the Hero of Homer’s Iliad - Achilles as the Hero of Homer’s Iliad       When Homer lived, the stature of a hero was measured by the yardstick of fighting ability. In Homer's Iliad, the character of Achilles represents the epitome of the Greek 'heroic code'. Only Achilles fights for pure heroics, while the characters of Diomedes and Hector provide good contrasts. "Prowess on the battlefield was ranked supreme, high above any considerations of morality"(Martin 26). Nestor, for example, tells Agamemnon and Achilles that he has known much "better men than them" meaning men who are better at fighting....   [tags: Iliad essays]
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1595 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Iliad - The Iliad The Iliad is the first written document, of anything. Never before the Iliad was the tool of writing used to such an extent. The Iliad is a marvelous piece of work. Great in its fame and content, the Iliad was used as the first historical text, philosophical writing, and storybook. Historians use it for an account of an era. Philosophers use it as one of the basis of human thought. To children, it is a wonderful story of battles between man and their gods. It is a writing of many uses....   [tags: Homer] 1467 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Iliad - The Iliad Central to any study of the humanities is the human condition – our nature, which has historically shown that it is equally capable of both good and evil deeds – and the problem that arises from it; specifically, why do humans suffer. Many philosophies and religions have their own account for this aspect of humanity, and we find that what the accounts have in common is each explains the human condition in terms that are similar to how that institution of thought explains the true nature of reality....   [tags: Greece Greek Literature Essays]
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2527 words
(7.2 pages)
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The Iliad - The Iliad is not about the Trojan War; that war lasted ten years and the central actions of the poem occupy only a few weeks. War brutalizes men and women, wounds their bodies and minds, enslaves and kills them. This is Homer's message as he focuses on one hero, Achilleus, to demonstrate wrath's destruction of self and others. Achilleus' moral journey in the Iliad brings him face to face with his own humanity, leading him to a startling and essentially unheroic act of generosity toward his enemy....   [tags: World Literature] 3589 words
(10.3 pages)
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Hector as the True Hero of Homer’s Iliad - Hector is the True Hero of Iliad        In today's society, a man's mind is his most important tool. In the past, however, a man's courage and strength is all that he had to keep him alive. In Homer's Iliad, courage is valued over honesty and even faithfulness to one's wife. If a hero is the most courageous man in the bunch, then Hector is more heroic than Achilles and King of the Myrmidons. Hector is the true hero of Homer's Iliad. Although Achilles and Hector are both leaders of men, Hector leads with a mature sense that gives his men reason to respect him....   [tags: Homer’s Iliad Essays]
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2380 words
(6.8 pages)
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The Iliad and the Odyssey - The Iliad and the Odyssey are two classic stories told by Homer. Within these two stories the roles of the gods are very important to the story line and how they affect the characters throughout. In the Iliad, more gods are involved with the characters whereas in the Odyssey there are only two major gods that affect two major characters. The roles of the gods in the Iliad are through two different stances of immortal versus immortal and mortal versus immortal. The roles of the gods in the Odyssey are through two major gods and they affect the plot as Poseidon versus Odysseus and Athena versus Telemachus....   [tags: story and character analysis] 1521 words
(4.3 pages)
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Iliad And Odyssey - The views and beliefs of societies are often portrayed in the literature, art, and cinema of a certain era. The epic poems, The Iliad and Odyssey, give scholars and historians an idea how the Ancient Greek lived their everyday lives. By reading the two "novels," the reader is able to experience the three thousand years old society of Homer. The various similarities between our society and the societies depicted in the Iliad and the Odyssey are surprising profuse. To name a few: the superfluous violence in Iliad and Odyssey, the characterization of Odysseus, the obscure use of narcotics, the similarities between Catholicism and certain stories of the Odyssey, and the role of pets...   [tags: essays research papers] 1793 words
(5.1 pages)
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Homer's Iliad - Homer's Iliad The Iliad is an epic of death. It is a tale of conflict, batle, agony, and horific mutilation. Honor and glory are atained through warfare. The great shield of Achiles stands out in this context because it depicts the glories of an orderly, functioning, productive civilization. This depiction of life stands in stark contrast to the scenes of death that constitute a large portion of the narative. An examination of the shield of Achiles in Homer’s Iliad reveals many ideas in conflict: love and honor, the pleasures of life versus a heroic death, free wil and destiny....   [tags: Art Tool of Warfare Papers]
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3970 words
(11.3 pages)
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Troy vs. The Iliad - Troy vs. The Iliad Over the thousands of years that the epic story the Iliad has survived, there has no doubt been some form of alteration to Homer’s original. Last May, Wolfgang Petersen directed a movie based on the Iliad. This movie, Troy, has proven to be a very loose adaptation of Homer’s original, as are almost all stories that are made into movies, unfortunately. With its timeless storyline, amazing scenery, gorgeous actors/actresses and most of all, its reported two hundred million dollar budget, it is easy to see why Troy was hyped up to be a box office hit....   [tags: Epic Stories Literature Essays]
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1372 words
(3.9 pages)
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Achiles’ Shield in the Iliad - Achiles’ Shield as an Element of Contradistinction in the Iliad The Iliad is an epic of death. It is a tale of conflict, battle, agony, and horrific mutilation. Honor and glory are attained through warfare. The great shield of Achiles stands out in this context because it depicts the glories of an orderly, functioning, productive civilization. This depiction of life stands in stark contrast to the scenes of death that constitute a large portion of the narrative. An examination of the shield of Achiles in Homer’s Iliad reveals many ideas in conflict: love and honor, the pleasures of life versus a heroic death, free will and destiny....   [tags: Literature Art War Papers]
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3979 words
(11.4 pages)
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Comparing The Iliad and The Bible - Comparing The Iliad and The Bible     Throughout recorded history, man has sought explanations for the various phenomena that occur in every facet of nature, and when no obvious answer is forthcoming, still a theory is often proposed.  These explanatory theories, often taking the form of stories or chronicles, are usually linked to some sort of mysticism or divine intervention.  By ascribing that which he does not understand to the gods’ will at work, man avoids facing up to his own lack of knowledge in a given area, and also draws comfort from assuming that the universe does indeed function under the guidance of divine beings.  Thus the explanatory accounts that man crafts enhance his...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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2161 words
(6.2 pages)
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Heoes of the Iliad and the Odyssey - “All men make mistakes, but a good man yields when he knows his course is wrong, and repairs the evil. The only crime is pride.” ― Sophocles, Antigone Honor is a major component of ancient Greek culture, which weaves its way through out the great epics of the time. It is perhaps the single most important entity to some of the most renowned heroes. However, the desire for honor seems to have the power to lead such famous men into the clutches of “excessive pride”, or hubris (Oxford Dictionaries.com)....   [tags: pride, Homer, ancient greek epic poems]
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1619 words
(4.6 pages)
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Similes in Homer's Iliad - An Examination of Similes in the Iliad - and how Homer's Use of Them Affected the Story In the Iliad, Homer finds a great tool in the simile. Just by opening the book in a random place the reader is undoubtedly faced with one, or within a few pages. Homer seems to use everyday activities, at least for the audience, his fellow Greeks, in these similes nearly exclusively. When one is confronted with a situation that is familiar, one is more likely to put aside contemplating the topic and simply inject those known feelings....   [tags: essays research papers] 1875 words
(5.4 pages)
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The Historic Accuracy of Homer’s Iliad - Homer’s Iliad has been a European myth for many millennia , the long poetic narrative written in the 8th century B.C. recounts a fearsome war fought over a beautiful woman. The reliability of Homers Iliad as a true historical document has been challenged for hundreds of years and only through archaeological studies can the truth be deciphered. The Iliad was written five centuries after the war, where the stories had been passed down through the oral tradition, therefore the type of society reflected within the poems resemble much more the time of Homer ....   [tags: Trojan War, Greek Mythology] 2935 words
(8.4 pages)
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Essay on Women in Iliad, Odyssey, and the Bible - Role of Women in Iliad, Odyssey, and the Bible Much is known of men in ancient civilizations, from the famous philosophers and mathematicians of Greece to the patriarchs and subsequent kings of the nation of Israel. It would seem, however, that history has forgotten the women of these times. What of the famous female thinkers of Ancient Greece, the distinguished stateswomen of Rome. What power did they hold. What was their position in societies of the distant past. A glimpse into the roles and influence of women in antiquity can be discovered in such ancient masterpieces as the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Hebrew Bible....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1539 words
(4.4 pages)
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Comparing the Immature Males of the Iliad and Lysistrata - The Immature Males of the Iliad and Lysistrata   Both Homer's Iliad and Aristophanes' Lysistrata explore the nature and character of men. In their respective portrayals of male characters, both works reveal a fundamental flaw in that nature. This underlying flaw, immaturity, results in a variety of childish behaviors that are not only inappropriate but potentially quite dangerous and destructive. Reliance on women, inability to exert self-control, and resorting to violence as an easy solution to any problem or perceived threat are typical traits of young boys....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1895 words
(5.4 pages)
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The Relationships of Fate, the Gods, and Man in "The Iliad" - One of the most compelling topics The Iliad raises is that of the intricate affiliations between fate, man and the gods. Many events related by Homer in his epic poem exhibit how these three connections interweave and eventually determine the very lives of the men and women involved in the war. Homer leaves these complex relationships slightly unclear throughout the epic, never spelling out the exact bonds connecting men's fate to the gods and what can be considered the power of fate. The motivation for the ambiguousness present in The Iliad is not easily understood, but it is a question that enriches and helps weave an even greater significance of the results into Homer's masterpiece....   [tags: World Literature] 1440 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Gods, and Zeus Especially, as Spectators in the Iliad - As spectators we are normally passive onlookers of the action taking place. The only influence we can have over the outcome is by making the participants aware of our support by cheering, or of our anger and frustration at an action by chanting and booing. We place our trust in the officials and referees to ensure that strict guidelines and rules are adhered to throughout the action. As spectators we are also commentators expressing our opinions regarding the actions of the participants and the officials....   [tags: trojans, zeus, poseidon] 2048 words
(5.9 pages)
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A Comparison of the Role of Women in Homer’s Odyssey and Iliad - The Role of Women in Odyssey and The Iliad The Iliad and Odyssey present different ideals of women, and the goddesses, who are presented as ideal women, differ between the two epics. The difference in roles is largely dependent on power, and relations to men, as well as sexual desirability and activity. The goddesses have a major role in both epics as Helpers of men. They have varied reasons for this.  One is a maternal instinct. This is displayed in the literal mother-son relationships of Aphrodite and Aeneas, Thetis and Achilles, and the protective instinct that Athene displays in Book 3 of the Iliad when Pandarus arrow shot an arrow at Menelaus and she "took her stand in front and ward...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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3364 words
(9.6 pages)
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The Created and Existent Gods in Homer’s Iliad - The ancient Greeks used the gods to explain the extraordinary and unusual events of the world around them. The ancient Greek world accepted these gods as anthropomorphic representations of natural forces and phenomena. Moreover, some gods were seen as actual people whose supernatural abilities gave them control over these natural forces. Homer’s Iliad is a prime example of these two different interpretations of the gods. In this epic, Homer anthropomorphizes some phenomena, thus creating deities in order to explain some of the events of the Trojan War....   [tags: Greek, Classics, Olympian Gods] 2319 words
(6.6 pages)
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The Funeral Games of Patroklos in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey - The Funeral Games of Patroklos in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey        Coming towards the end of a war which has consumed an entire decade and laid waste the lives of many, the Greek warriors in Troy choose to take the time and energy to hold funeral games.  This sequence of events leaves the reader feeling confused because it's not something one would expect and seems highly out of place.  Throughout the epic Homer tries to describe what it is to be mortal and often contrasts it with what it means to be immortal.  Homer uses the funeral games of Patroklos to show crucial differences about the lives of mortals and the lives of gods....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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2162 words
(6.2 pages)
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Greek Mythologies: Gods and Mortals in Greek Literature - Greek mythologies arise from various cultural aspects of the Greek society; however, the role of the divinities in human affairs is particularly accentuated in most, if not all, Greek mythologies. Nevertheless, each author displays the role of divinities and supernatural differently, as Homer in The Odyssey and The Iliad displays direct interaction between the supernatural divinities and the mortals. On the other hand, Sophocles’ Antigone lessens such interactions and emphasizes the human role, while Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War completely ignores the notion of divine power, but focuses impartially on the actions of men and their consequences....   [tags: The Odyssey and The Iliad]
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1724 words
(4.9 pages)
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Pride Fueled Rage: Achilles - Achilles, the hero and great warrior of the Trojan War, is son of the goddess Thetis and mortal Peleus. He is extremely courageous and has tremendous honor, within his character however, is a juxtaposing inherent flaw of pride entwined with anger. Is it a necessary pride. Do all heroes have this character flaw. In The Iliad, the anger of Achilles is presented from the first line, “ Rage: / Sing Goddess, Achilles’ rage / Black and murderous…” (Line 1-3; p. 107). Here Achilles’ anger is described as rage, a term suitable to describe the anger of a God....   [tags: The Iliad Essays]
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1449 words
(4.1 pages)
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Tying Homer's Iliad to Virgil's Aeneid Through the Theme of Warfare - Warfare is a common thread that ties Homer's Iliad to Virgil's Aeneid. However, the way warfare is treated in the two epics is different. This can be attributed to many factors including the time between the composition of the pieces, the fact that pieces were written by different authors, and the fact that the pieces were written in different places. We can use these pieces to get a view of what the society that produced them thought about war and how the view of war changed as time went on in the ancient world....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 1491 words
(4.3 pages)
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Philosophy of Death in The Epic of Gilgamesh, Apology, The Satyricon, The Iliad, and The Martyrdom of Perpetua - The only things in life that cannot be avoided are taxes and death. In fact, death is the only way one can avoid taxes. Since it has such finality to it, what perspectives do people have regarding death. What are the images and attitudes they have. The documents The Epic of Gilgamesh, Apology, The Satyricon, The Iliad, and The Martyrdom of Perpetua are the most important documents of the Ancient world concerning Western philosophy on death. These documents are significant because the attitudes and images associated with each work are primarily influenced by the genre it which they were written....   [tags: death, gilgamesh, the liad, satan] 2136 words
(6.1 pages)
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Religious Beliefs in Aeschylus' Oresteia, Homer’s Iliad, and Sophocles’ Electra - Religious Beliefs in Aeschylus' Oresteia, Homer’s Iliad, and Sophocles’ Electra The final and definitive defeat of the Persian army at the battle of Plataea represented the end of an age-long threat to Athens. But the victory was also a miracle, as all the odds were against the Athenians at the onset of the war. While Pericles took charge of Athens after the war and started the advance of democracy, religion also thrived. The rebuilding of the Acropolis and the construction of the Parthenon and its great statue of Athene under Pericles' rule signified the height of religious belief among Athenians....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1673 words
(4.8 pages)
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The Trojan War - Assess the Trojan War, comparing the myth of the Iliad and other primary sources with the archeological evidence provided supporting the story of the sack of Troy. Focus Questions: 1. Where is it believed Troy is located. 2. When is it believed that Troy fell. 3. What was the importance of Troy in the ancient world. 4. What do we learn of the fall of Troy through the Iliad. 5. Which archeologist found the alleged site of Troy. 6. When was the alleged site of Troy discovered. 7. What is the importance of the discovery of Troy....   [tags: Myth, Iliad, Archeological Evidence]
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1487 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Tragic Heroes and their Effect on Humanity in Homer's "the Iliad" and "the Aeneid" - During their reading of the Iliad and the Aeneid, scores of readers only see the two great poets commenting on the nature of war and destruction. What countless do not see, however, are there passionate outcries on behalf of the tragic heroes and humanity itself. The author of the Iliad, Homer, has been theorized by some to be a collection of writers working in collaboration. Nevertheless, this author had an immeasurable effect on ancient Greek culture. The Aeneid was written by Virgil, who was born in 70 BCE and had two other works in addition to his epic masterpiece....   [tags: Iliad, Aeneid, ]
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1896 words
(5.4 pages)
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Divine Intervention in Homer's Epic Poem, The Iliad -       The gods and goddesses that the Greek people believe in make up the Greek mythology studied today.  These divine characters represent a family living on Mount Olympus who intervene frequently in the lives of the human characters in Greek plays.  They are omnipresent, for they are always observing mans actions and working through human nature.  The gods are a higher power, and provide explanations for otherwise unexplainable events.  The gods help humans in trouble and give them guidance about the future.  The Olympians influence men on earth both psychologically and physically.  In Homer's epic poem, The Iliad, the intervention of such divine powers as Athena,...   [tags: Iliad essays]
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2014 words
(5.8 pages)
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Honor as the Theme in Homer’s The Iliad - There are different forms and examples of exemplary and classic literature which have been deemed as significant works that are highly esteemed worldwide. These examples of literature would awe the world with how much literary skill they entailed when they were composed and written: attention to details as to formation of characters, the most crafty of plots, the most eloquent speeches and lines, the most astounding of twists of scenes, and most of all, the most universal and meaningful of themes....   [tags: Honor, Homer, Iliad]
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2018 words
(5.8 pages)
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Iliad Analysis - Two warrior-centric cultures, separated by oceans, but united by institutionalized patriarchy and a codified sense of the ideal warrior. It is crucial to first discuss the context in which these two societies functioned. The Iliad is likely based off historical events that occurred in Western Turkey in the 12th century BC. This was a culture of frequent war and constant instability. On the other hand, Chushingura takes place in the early 18th century AD under the political background of the stable Tokugawa Shogunate and the relatively prosperous Genroku period....   [tags: Chushingura, battle, glory]
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1943 words
(5.6 pages)
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Aristotle's Perspective of Friendship in Homer's Iliad - An Aristotelian Examination of Friendship in Homer's Iliad It is strange to label any friendship a success or a failure; it is stranger still to call the friendship between Achilleus and Patroklos a failure, especially when it has long been celebrated as one of the greatest friendships in antiquity. After all, friendship is called a success when friends remain just that, and a failure when they part ways with diffidence. How else could we possibly judge friendship. I suggest, however, that the good of the friend is the end of true friendship, and that this principle can guide critical inquiry into the nature of friendship....   [tags: Philosophy Essays]
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2390 words
(6.8 pages)
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