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Your search returned over 400 essays for "grapes of wrath"
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The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - The Grapes of Wrath In the novel, two of the main characters, Tom Joad and Jim Casy, are very similar in how they react to things. Their characters personalities are alike in the fact of how they view the world, and the journey they are going on. Because of the time they spend together they form a relationship and they have a certain effect on each other. Tom Joad is the protagonist in the novel The Grapes of Wrath. He is good-natured and thoughtful. Tom is a character who devotes himself to the present moment, the future, which is out of reach, does not concern him at all....   [tags: essays research papers] 650 words
(1.9 pages)
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Grapes Of Wrath In Times Of De - &#8220;The Grapes of Wrath: In Times of Despair'; If one was to examine the three characters, Tom, Ma, and Pa Joad from John Steinback&#8217;s The Grapes of Wrath. How would we figure out what astrological signs they were born under, as taken from their actions and attitudes in the novel. What certain qualities do they possess, that make them fit there Zodiac sign. Tom Joad, a hard stubborn man, who has served time in prison for murder. He has come back home to find his family falling apart....   [tags: essays research papers] 594 words
(1.7 pages)
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Grapes of Wrath and It's a Wonderful Life - Grapes of Wrath and It's a Wonderful Life Following the relatively prosperous era nicknamed the "Roaring Twenties" came the Great Depression. Unemployment skyrocketed and good times were hard to be found. In the movie "It's a Wonderful Life" - we see the transformation from stability to utter chaos. With World War I freshly over, there was joy and celebration to welcome American 'boys' coming back home. Huge technological improvements and scientific breakthroughs paved the way for larger, more stable and profitable financial markets....   [tags: Economy Great Depression Essays] 1093 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - THE GRAPES OF WRATH -Movie Review- FROM A TRIBUNE MOVIE CRITIC VIEW POINT People today realize that individualism in our time, of the Great Depression, doesn't work. The stock market is plunging; people are losing their jobs, money, and homes. The most well known people suffering through these hard times are the Okies. Okies come from Oklahoma, the major home of the Dust Bowl. The Okies continue to flock to the land of promise, California. Their motive is to find work and better living conditions....   [tags: essays research papers] 627 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - The Grapes of Wrath The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck was a novel about people that learn that they can achieve more together than they can alone. This book did meet the criteria of Aristotle's "Poetics". There were many memorable characters, memorable scenes, a significant theme, and the use of language was very important. The memorable characters were Pa, Ma, Granpa, Granma, Casy, Tom, Al, Noah, Uncle John, the pregnant Rose of Sharon, Connie, Ruthie, and Winfield. The story starts out when Tom gets out of prison and goes back to his home in Salisaw, Oklahoma....   [tags: essays research papers] 841 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - John Steinbeck's novel, The Grapes of Wrath has left much specifically untold about the authors true intentions on this book. His epic chronicle has been described as being "Written with passionate conviction" (Dorothy Parker). This passionate conviction has led John Steinbeck into mastering bold dramatization. His skills at the art of dramatization in literature was not solely used in The Grapes of Wrath, but also used in another of his twisted and possibly controversial works called Of Mice and Men....   [tags: essays research papers] 888 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - The migrant situation of the 1930’s as depicted in Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath was caused by many diverse factors. It started with an extremely dreadful drought, known as the Dust Bowl, which swept through the mid-west. The gluttonous landowners and the multitudes of fliers that they passed out made the situation even worse. To top off all of that the nation was going through a terrible depression. At this time the whole nation was changing as a whole. These few main factors led to one of the most widespread waves of migrant workers this country has ever seen....   [tags: essays research papers] 388 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - Nature is not pure. It has its own inconsistencies. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck clearly expresses that Nature and Man are one. The humans in the novel are different and each contributes differently to the conflict. Some humans contribute in creating the conflict while others contribute to the solution. Nature is the same way. It is not always dependable, yet many people put all of their faith into it. Nature can create and destroy all in one breath. In the beginning of the novel, the land is dry and the last rains are falling....   [tags: essays research papers] 502 words
(1.4 pages)
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John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath serves as a milestone in the plethora of literature addressing the lives, adversities and perseverance of those affected by the American Great Depression of the 1920s and 1930s. However, the responses generated by the book vary greatly. Some have hailed it as one of the great American masterpieces, flaws included, whilst others describe it as a “so-so” book fraught with distorted, dramatised history and propaganda. The question that persists sixty-six years after the publication of the novel, and sixty-five years after the début of John Ford’s black and white drama, is can this work serve as reliable history and enduring literature....   [tags: essays research papers] 1321 words
(3.8 pages)
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Cannery Row And Grapes Of Wrath - John Steinbeck is a brilliant storyteller capable of crafting such vibrant and captivating literary works that one can effortlessly exit their own life and enter another. John Steinbeck has a passion for divulging the flaws of human nature and he is not afraid to write about the raw and tragic misfortune that plagued the lives of people like the Okies in the Grapes of Wrath and residents of Cannery Row. He was also a brilliant commentator who contributed brilliant opinions on the political and social systems in our world....   [tags: John Steinbeck] 1764 words
(5 pages)
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Grapes of Wrath - biblica comparison - Many novels written contain parallels to the Bible. This couldn’t be truer in the case John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. Steinbeck alludes to Biblical characters and events with the use of Rose of Sharon, Jim Casy, and also the Joad’s journey to California. There are other events in the book that parallel the Bible, although the portrayal of Rose of Sharon and Jim Casy are the most obvious. The novel is broken into 3 different parts, the time spent in Oklahoma, the journey on the road, and the time spent in California....   [tags: essays research papers] 617 words
(1.8 pages)
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Symbolism in the Grapes of Wrath - During the depression of the 1930's, the combined evils of the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl drought left many southern farming families landless and weak. Little hope was left for them but to pack up and moved to California, which was widely advertised in circulated handbills that promised work and inspired hope. John Steinbeck’s epic novel, The Grapes of Wrath tells the story of the migrant farmers’ travels and what they met at their destination. Intertwined within the plot and the intercalary chapters of the story is a profound use of symbolism in various forms and with many meanings....   [tags: essays research papers] 1029 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Grapes Of Wrath: Symbolic Characters - The Grapes of Wrath: Symbolic Characters Struggling through such things as the depression, the Dust Bowl summers, and trying to provide for their own families, which included finding somewhere to travel to where life would be safe. Such is the story of the Joads. The Joads were the main family in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, a book which was written in order to show what a family was going through, at this time period, and how they were trying to better their lives at the same time. It wouldn't be enough for Steinbeck to simply write this story in very plain terms, as anyone could have simply logged an account of events and published it....   [tags: essays research papers] 2890 words
(8.3 pages)
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Grapes of Wrath versus The Pearl - I have recently finished reading John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath" and "The Pearl". These two and many other of Steinbeck's books have a couple of things in common. The first thing is that they are all about poor people/families. The second thing is that they are almost always terribly sad in the end. The third thing they share is that I enjoy each one very much. I have never read a book by John Steinbeck that I did not like, even though his books do not exactly cheer me up. "The Pearl" is about a poor man named Kino, his wife Juana, and their baby boy Coyotito....   [tags: John Steinbeck] 761 words
(2.2 pages)
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Book Review On Grapes Of Wrath - A Critical Review of: John Steinbeck&#8217;s The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck wrote this book in the hopes that people would be able to see what was happening to our nation&#8217;s people. He wanted to open their eyes to see the hardships that migrants faced everyday and he accomplished this through the telling of the Joad&#8217;s family story. Starting with the day that their ex-convict son comes home on parole, the lives of the Joad&#8217;s never really go back to normal....   [tags: essays research papers] 541 words
(1.5 pages)
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Alienation In The Grapes Of Wrath - An effective way writers demonstrate the moral values of a society is by not telling the story from one in the society, but from the point of view of a person alienated from it. This method reveals small things that one in the society would not notice and provides different insights only one from outside the society can notice. Such is the case in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath. Tom Joad's alienation from the rich Californian landowners shows that money is the top priority of those who own land, while the poor, assumed-worthless families are on the opposite end of the spectrum....   [tags: John Steinbeck] 1066 words
(3 pages)
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Biblical References in Grapes of Wrath - In his novel Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck integrated many biblical references and values throughout the book. This provided a more intriguing and complex style of writing that he used to tell about the Dust Bowl of the early 1900’s and the arduous journey the Joad family and many others took to reach California. The first biblical reference is revealed when the Joad family leaves for California. “the rest swarmed up on top of the load, Connie and Rose of Sharon, Pa and Uncle John, Ruthie and Winfield, Tom and the preacher....   [tags: essays research papers] 1289 words
(3.7 pages)
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Grapes Of Wrath - Stereotyping - Stereotyping and Its Effects Stereotyping, brought on by the existence of a class system, has many positive effects in John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath. This class system, made up of migrants and affluent people, is present due to the fact that many of the affluent people stereotype the migrants as poor, uneducated, and easily agitated human beings. Thus, this sets a boundary between the educated individuals and migrants. At first, most migrants ignore the effects stereotyping has on them. But towards the end of their journeys to California, the migrants’ rage that had been gradually building up inside lets out and the migrants take action....   [tags: essays research papers] 587 words
(1.7 pages)
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New Beginnings in The Grapes of Wrath and Broken Ground - New beginnings and new land, while made out to seem as beacons of hope and chances for prosperity, are complete opposites; new beginnings offer neither success nor happiness, but rather more failures and recurring sorrows. John Steinbeck and Jack Hodgins introduce the idea of new beginnings and settlements just as they emphasize the importance of togetherness as a community and a family in The Grapes of Wrath and Broken Ground. However, it is important to consider that these new beginnings were involuntary and rather forced due to situational circumstances....   [tags: Broken Ground] 936 words
(2.7 pages)
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Grapes of Wrath and What I Expected Essay - As humans, we are born into this world that leaves behind unknown concepts in its crevices. Through life, we learn through our mistakes and become accustomed with the way we live on this planet. In life, there is a good and a bad: a balance. Unfortunately, sometimes the negative outweighs the positive, or life throws a curveball at us. Essentially, you aren’t necessarily going to live a life without hardships and struggle. However, even though life is unexpected and hard at times, in the end things will get better....   [tags: John Steinbeck's novel] 542 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Role of Food in The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath - Eating and drinking is not only a necessity, but also a pleasure. Humans have known and experienced this since the beginning of man. Food plays a very important part in everybody’s daily life. However, the role of food in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s work The Great Gatsby and John Steinbeck’s novel The Grapes of Wrath vary immensely. The complexity and need for sustenance differ between the books, but both reflect the events, viewpoints, and attitudes of the time periods they are set in. The complexity of food and drink changes from book to book....   [tags: John Steinbeck, Scott Fitzgerald]
:: 4 Works Cited
832 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Grapes of Wrath, an Important Commentary on Humanity and Society - The Grapes of Wrath is a novel published in 1939 and written by John Steinbeck, who was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the Nobel Prize for Literature.Steinbeck wrote The Grapes of Wrath at his home, 16250 Greenwood Lane, in what is now Monte Sereno, California. Set during the Great Depression, the novel focuses on a poor family of sharecroppers, the Joads, driven from their home by drought, economic hardship, and changes in the agriculture industry. In a nearly hopeless situation, they set out for California's Central Valley along with thousands of other "Okies" in search of land, jobs, and dignity....   [tags: Stienbeck, Literary Analysis, Literary Criticism] 1016 words
(2.9 pages)
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Theme Of Grapes Of Wrath - The Journey Theme of The Grapes of Wrath In the Classic novel The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck displays in his writing many different and interconnected themes. The main idea of the novel can be interpreted many different ways through many of the different actions and characters throughout the novel. In the first chapter of the novel, Steinbeck describes the dust bowl and foreshadows the theme: The men came were silent and they did not move often. And the women came out of the houses to stand beside their men-to feel whether this time the men would break....   [tags: essays research papers] 656 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Deaths of Minor Characters in The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath - Throughout American literature, the deaths of certain characters often transpire as unavoidably as the termination of life in the real world. In the realm of realistic fiction from the early twentieth century, deaths begin to signify more than just the simple loss of a life. In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, the deaths of seemingly minor characters not only signify the end of an era and termination of a fight, but the beginnings of a new life and the revelation of human nature to push hard times onto a third party in hopes of unachieved selfish ambition....   [tags: John Steinbeck, F. Scott Fitzgerald]
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1568 words
(4.5 pages)
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My Favorite Character in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - ... My favorite character in this movie is Tommy because while everyone has gone through a lot, he has kept his character throughout it all. Character, selflessness, and understanding are what makes Tommy my favorite character in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck. Tommy is able to stay true to himself and keep his character throughout the whole story of The Grapes of Wrath in which many people have let the depression turn them into terrible people. When Tommy gets out of jail the only thing that he wants is for his life to go back to normal....   [tags: tommy, family, farm, land, selflessness] 1052 words
(3 pages)
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Grapes Of Wrath Biblical Allusions - John Steinbeck carefully molded his story The Grapes of Wrath to encompass many themes and ideas. He included several Biblical allusions to enforce his message of the migrating families coming together to form a community. Steinbeck alludes to Biblical characters through Jim Casy and Rose of Sharon, events like the family’s journey to California and the flood at the end of the novel, and teachings throughout the novel.      The Biblical allusions represented by the characters in the novel are most obvious in the characters of Jim Casy and Rose of Sharon....   [tags: John Steinbeck Bible Religion essays papers]
:: 1 Works Cited
881 words
(2.5 pages)
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Unmasking Capitalism in Steinbeck´s The Grapes of Wrath - In 2008, Rudra Sabaratnam, the CEO of the City of Angels Medical Center, committed health care fraud when he attempted to extort money from Medicare and Medi-Cal. He was wealthy, yet, his greed for more money led him to cheat the taxpayer-funded healthcare programs of millions of dollars, depriving the people who actually need the help and money. The greed that Sabaratnam had was partly caused by the profit seeking capitalist system. The desire for wealth in capitalist society leads to corruption and causes a divide between the rich and the poor, so perhaps a system that supports equality and fairness is a better choice....   [tags: corruption, fraud, John Steinbeck, communism]
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1013 words
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Alienation, A Theme in John Steinbeck´s The Grapes of Wrath - ... "Okie" became a derogatory term used by Californians who feared that the people migrating from the Midwest would take their jobs. Californians alienated and dehumanized migrants by labeling them. The implication that a migrant is a “dirty son-of-a-bitch” further serves to dehumanize migrants by relating them to filthy street dogs. The word scum is also demeaning, and by comparing migrants to dirt Steinbeck shows that Californians thought that the migrants were worthless. Paranoid Californians did whatever they felt was required to ensure that they retained their property and work....   [tags: Okie, Migration, California] 634 words
(1.8 pages)
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A Man's Humility in the Grapes of Wrath by John Steinkbeck - ... We got bread to make san’widges.” “I know, ma’am.” His humility was insistent. “We need bread and there ain’t nothin’ for quite a piece, they say.” The man is trying to buy a loaf of bread for ten cents from a waitress at diner. “This ain’t a grocery store. We got bread to make san’widges.” . Mae at this point of the story is aggressive towards the man. When the man spoke he didn’t say anything rude to keep Mae away from offensive speech. The man responds with humbleness. The man responds this way to keep her away from being defensive and so he doesn’t look like a bad person....   [tags: malpractice, change, curiosity] 607 words
(1.7 pages)
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Parallels Between The Grapes of Wrath and the Life of John Steinbeck - John Steinbeck was born on February 27, 1902 in Salinas, California. He had a pretty average childhood with a supportive family and a decent education. While growing up his mother, Olive Hamilton, was a major factor in his education, since she was a schoolteacher and made it her duty to educate him. His mother most likely was the reason he developed a love of reading and literature and ended up going to Stanford. In his child there were only two major events that affected his writing. These were when he worked on a ranch with migrant workers, and when his father’s business failed and the family was temporarily thrust into poverty....   [tags: Writing Style, John Steinbeck's Life]
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2935 words
(8.4 pages)
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The Dust Bowl in John Steinbeck´s The Grapes of Wrath - ... The Californians fear the Okies lack of civilized social standards. In order for the Okies to survive, they forgo basic sanitary needs in return for food and work. The families struggle to hold on to a sophisticated life; instead they become simple folks with simple needs. The Okies sacrifice the privileges of a luxurious life for the only life they can afford on less than a few dollars a day. Along with this, the lack of jobs and the despair the families face alter their behavior, showing the raw survival instinct within....   [tags: Okies, Migrant, Workers]
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840 words
(2.4 pages)
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A Different Light on The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath captures a facet of American history, but it does not truly explain the horrors of the 1930’s Dust Bowl. It had extreme short term effects along with a few long term effects on the terrain and the lives of the people impacted by it. It is such a terrible disaster that one could publish a full sized encyclopedia volume on the many hardships of the people living in the Dust Bowl and those who moved away when they were foreclosed upon. There are so many causes of so many different factors of the Dust Bowl that it can only truly be told as a grizzly horror story....   [tags: world war I, suitcase farmers]
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1671 words
(4.8 pages)
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Failures of the American Dream in The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath - An effortless quote, just a few words put together in a sentence, can often perfectly explain the backbone of some stories. Oscar Wilde's simple, seven worded sentence, "Ambition is the last refuge of failure" perfectly articulates basic ideas of both The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald and The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (“Oscar wilde quotes”, 2010). The characters in both books are searching for the figurative Eden of the time, the American Dream. However, in both cases, the characters fall short at achieving the basic ideas of that dream; social development, wealth achievement, and endless opportunity....   [tags: Essays on the American Dream ]
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1014 words
(2.9 pages)
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Greed Overpowers All in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - People wonder how a human would change when his/her surroundings change. Will they change for the better or worse. Will they still be willing to go out of their way to help those how are around them. John Steinbeck shows us in The Grapes of Wrath how a person can change when they have nothing. He shows us how when people are desperate, they would do anything to further themselves and only themselves. Most of all, he shows us how greed overpowers anything and everything when times are desperate. This motif assists in developing a major theme in the book....   [tags: change, desperate, greed, advance]
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855 words
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The Power of Humility: The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - ... Immediately the waitress Mae being a stereotype and thinking he was trying to trick her said that the bread was for making sandwiches only. In response the man says that he needs the bread to feed his children because it’s a long road ahead of them to California. The waitress then tells him that if they sell bread their going run out to make sandwiches. The man then tells her that he’s hungry but needs to make a dime do all of his family. This gets Mae to change her reaction and change her mind because she’s starting to feel more and more sympathy for the man....   [tags: great depression, behavior] 651 words
(1.9 pages)
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Unforgivable Crimes in Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - John Steinbeck was one of America’s great authors, and had written several remarkable novels during his time. His novels always seem to consist of men who have committed crimes that are considered unforgivable, and instantly mark a person as evil. In his text, Of Mice and Men, Lennie was a big guy but a little special in the head, he was sweet but had no control over the strength in his body. He would always end up doing sinful things, but not because he was simply a bad person. In Steinbeck’s other text, Grapes of Wrath, he had another character that had committed unforgivable crimes....   [tags: crime, passion, family, help] 672 words
(1.9 pages)
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Illegal Immigrants: A Modern Day Grapes of Wrath - As depicted in John Steinbeck's novel Grapes of Wrath the 1930's was a time when migrant workers like the story's Joad family had to leave their homes, cross a perilous desert, live through the social injustices of the time, and work at jobs with low insufficient pay just to have a better life (Steinbeck). Seventy years later, the situations and experiences stay the same but the people are no longer native-born Americans but illegal immigrants who sacrifice everything to come to the United States to live a better life, as a result of that the 500,000 immigrants that illegally enter the United States through the Mexican border annually and stay in the country are the Joads of today (Aizenman)...   [tags: Mexican immigrants, immigration] 1532 words
(4.4 pages)
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The American Dream In The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath - “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness (Independence Hall Association, 2011).” This exert from The Declaration of Independence provides a look on America and how life is meant to be lived; with all individuals having an equal right to exist. This existence includes life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. This beacons to one vital idea, one main vision, which creates a fundamental dream....   [tags: John Steinbeck, F. Scott Fitzgerald]
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814 words
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The Great Depression in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - The Grapes of Wrath is a realist novel that was written by John Steinbeck in the year 1939. The book has gained critical acclamation around the world to result in awards such as the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award for fiction and culminated by winning the Nobel Prize in the year 1962. The book was set by the author during the Great Depression in the United States, which has been used to highlight the challenges and experiences of American people during that period. The book focuses on a family by the name the Joads and their struggle to survive in period marked by economic hardship with widespread bank foreclosures that forced a significant number of farmers in the country out of empl...   [tags: the dust bowl, bank foreclosures] 1468 words
(4.2 pages)
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A Message of Hope in the Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck is most often perceived as a depressing that enumerates the many failings of humans during the Great Depression and in general society. Daniel Joseph Singal agrees with this viewpoint, but with a twist. In his essay “Towards a Definition of American Modernism”, Singal shares how Steinbeck also has a message of hope contained within his story of hardship. Through the dreams a Ma and Rose of Sharon Joad, Steinbeck cautions readers on the action of dreaming, because one’s fantasies do not always turn into an expected reality....   [tags: great depression, hardship, dream]
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552 words
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Commentary Analysis of The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - ... Unification is safer. There is a better chance of finding food and even work by sticking together. There are many men and many hungry families but so few jobs. In chapter three, Steinbeck describes a "concrete highway" that a turtle has a tough time crossing. Once the turtle almost reaches the destination it gets hit. As it struggles to flip back over and continue on its journey. This represents the continuous obstacles that the Joads and the other farmers handle throughout the story. This is a metaphor showing, like the turtle, the Joads refuse to give up....   [tags: Family, Dustbowl, Migration] 602 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Transmogrification of Tom Joad in Steinbeck's _Grapes of Wrath_ - As Jonathan Swift once said, “Nothing is so hard for those who abound in riches as to conceive how others can be in want.” The Great Depression was a time of considerable sorrow for countless people across the United States. A crumbling economy and suffering industry coupled with hard climate conditions caused widespread unemployment, and forced a multitude of people off of their land. Entire plantations were crushed due to the lack of growing crops, and families were forced to migrate thousands of miles in order to seek a new and better life....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Human Corruption]
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1790 words
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Grapes Of Wrath: Summary - Grapes of Wrath: Summary The book Grapes of Wrath tells about the dust Bowl people's troubles they had coming to California. It tell about the Joad's trip from Oklahoma to California. There are twelve people in the Joad family. The one person that stood out the most between thee family was Ma. Ma's great strength, and smart thinking is what keeps the Joad family together and going. Ma's strong suites are shown through out the book. Nancy Reagan once said, "A women is like a tea bag-only in hot water do you realize how strong she is." I don't know how Nancy Reagan did this but she described Ma Joad to you exactly....   [tags: essays research papers] 451 words
(1.3 pages)
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Alienation in The Catcher in the Rye and The Grapes of Wrath - The theme of alienation is relevant in both “The Catcher in the Rye” and “The Grapes of Wrath. It is an idea presented very prominently in both books, expressed through characters, actions, and events. The Catcher in the Rye focuses on Holden Caulfield, a socially inadequate, sixteen year old boy who distances himself from others as a display of mental superiority driven by the idea he possesses that everyone is a phony, while he appears to be the only one who has remained genuine and authentic in today’s society....   [tags: essays research papers] 606 words
(1.7 pages)
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Comparing The Grapes of Wrath and The Power of One - Comparing The Grapes of Wrath and The Power of One "Two heads are better than one," it's always been said. But is another person always valuable, or can extra baggage keep an individual from achieving his goals. Both sides can be argued effectively, and both may be true depending on the circumstances. Two historical novels, The Grapes of Wrath and The Power of One, show how two sets of characters took different routes to achieve their goals and how they fared along the way. In The Grapes of Wrath, The Joads, a family of penniless migrant workers, travel to California to look for work, depending on the help of assorted strangers along the way, while The Power of One tells the story...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 1641 words
(4.7 pages)
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The Grapes of Wrath - Lifestyle in the 1930's - The Grapes of Wrath is a historical and fictional novel that was written by John Steinbeck in 1939. He wanted to show his point of view of life in US during the years of Great Depression. This essay will talk about the lifestyle the public had during that time which dramatically changed conditions that the environment in we stern part of US had. The plot of Steinbeck?s work of fiction is rooted in the historical and social events of 1930s America, specifically the environmental disaster in Oklahoma....   [tags: essays research papers] 1158 words
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The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - Accurate - John Steinbeck wrote in his 1939 novel The Grapes of Wrath: “And then the dispossessed were drawn west- from Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico; from Nevada and Arkansas, families, tribes, dusted out, tractored out. Carloads, caravans, homeless and hungry; twenty thousand and fifty thousand and a hundred thousand and two hundred thousand. They streamed over the mountains, hungry and restless – restless as ants, scurrying to find work to do – to lift, to push, to pull, to pick, to cut – anything, any burden to bear, for food....   [tags: essays research papers] 1111 words
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Irony in the Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - Irony in the Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck Many of the events in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck do not result in the expected manner. Although the Joads seem to be traveling in hope, irony seems to conquer several situations. There are three types of irony: in dramatic irony, the reader sees the characters mistakes, but not the character. In verbal irony, the author means something rather than what is said. Irony of situation is when there is a paradox between the purpose of an action and its result....   [tags: Papers] 768 words
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The Grapes Of Wrath Essay: The Malice of Society - Malice In Steinbeck’s novel, The Grapes of Wrath, the Joad family represents the thousands of migrant families who came to the west with the fantasy of obtaining a peaceful life after the Dust Bowl. Conversely they are faced with something resembling the epitome of human cruelty. Business owners and Californians do what they can to keep the Oklahoma families from breaching the invisible line that divides the privileged and the poor. This line, which only exists in the mind, causes people to loose their sense of humanity....   [tags: John Steinbeck]
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Symbolism in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - Symbolism in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck Through such hardships as the Depression, the Dust Bowl summers, and trying to provide for their own families, which included the search for a safe existence, we find the story of the Joad's. The Joad's are the main family in John Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath, which he created to give voice to the hundreds of families that found themselves at their absolute rock bottom during the Great Depression of the 20th Century in America. It wouldn't have been enough for Steinbeck to simply document the strife that faced these families in very plain terms, for anyone could have simply logged an account of events and published it....   [tags: Papers] 2295 words
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The Grapes Of Wrath: Connections To The Great Depression - The Grapes of Wrath: Connections to the Great Depression The decaying state of the American economy and the onset of the Great Depression in the 1930s brought about the necessity for the United States to reconsider its attitudes and examine the long term effects of its policies concerning wide-scale socioeconomic problems that were constantly growing bigger. The Great Depression led to the creation of many new and innovative government policies and programs, along with revisions to older economic systems....   [tags: John Steinbeck] 1573 words
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Belief in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath - Belief in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath Holiness, sin, and life are repeatedly questioned throughout John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, particularly by the former preacher, Jim Casey. As a preacher, Casey only preaches what the bible states and he resigns from his occupation after he feels the urge to pursue life's true meaning and values of the individual - basically to make sense of the world he resides in. Casey closely resembles the character and motives of Jesus Christ, as he is enthused to uncover the answers to his wonders and doubts and begins to hold new beliefs of sacrificing the self to sustain the rights of society....   [tags: Free Essay Writer] 725 words
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Analysis of a Passage from The Grapes of Wrath - Depicting the Dust Bowl exodus, The Grapes of Wrath is a literary masterpiece. Development and hierarchy are portrayed. In the passage to be studied, almost at the beginning of the novel, Tom Joad, who has just been released from prison, discovered his abandoned house. Travelling with Casy, a former preacher, they met Muley Graves , one of his former neighbours who refused to leave the country, after people have been tractored off. Hardly the only one to speak, Muley explained how he then lived alone, wandering from one empty house to another....   [tags: essays research papers] 2866 words
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The Selfishness Of Man in Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath - The Selfishness of Man Cultural and economical pressures often lead people to behave corruptly. In John Steinbeck?s novel, The Grapes of Wrath, set in the dustbowl era, people act out of greed rather than out of consideration or kindness. Tom Joad and his family have been run off their land by inconsiderate, money hungry businessmen who do not care about the impact homelessness will have on the evictees. The story revolves around the Joad Family?s trip (joined by former preacher Casey) from Oklahoma to California, along route 66, where they expect to find work....   [tags: essays research papers] 1032 words
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Equal Power for Women in The Grapes Of Wrath - John Steinbeck wrote a book, The Grapes of Wrath, which would change forever the way Americans, thought about their social classes and even their own families. The novel was completed in 1938 and then published in 1939. When this novel was released the critics saw it as being very controversial. Some critics called it a master piece, while others called it pornography. Steinbeck's attack of the upper-class and the readers' inability to distinguish the fictitiousness of the book often left his readers disgruntled....   [tags: John Steinbeck] 1190 words
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The Faith Of Jim Casy in "Grapes of Wrath" - The joad family has known Jim Casy as the preacher but not any more. He was an honorable man with the good faith he has. He is respected and loved by the Joad family he has baptized the children he remembers the family from a long while back. He was a man of God. He was a “Burning Busher”(20). Back then he was called Reverend Jim Casy. He said to Tom Joad “I aint’t got the call any more got a lot of sinful idears but they seem kinda sensible.” He has lost the spirtual touch he once had. In the beginning of the book Jim Casy’s physical features are that he is a tall man with a long head....   [tags: Steinbeck, Character Analysis] 947 words
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Grandpa Joad’s Death, Grandma Joad’s Death, and Their Oklahoma Home - In The Grapes of Wrath, Grandpa Joad is a very outspoken person, he does not watch what he says, and he just says it. He is a hyperactive elder, everyone else wants to leave the family farm behind, and start over new, Grampa Joad is refusing to leave the family’s farm that he has always been on. The Joad family has been in the good zone when it comes to being in or paying off their debts, now they have gotten behind on paying them that they are forced to move off the family farm. Grandpa Joad has had some violent times in his past, so they do not want to aggravate him on the situation to much, but they began to leave the land after finally getting Grandpa Joad to come, as they start to head...   [tags: Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath]
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The Value of Unity in Spirit - John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath is a classic American novel based on the Dust Bowl migration that took place in the 1930’s. Serving as an example of all migrant families in the 30’s, his book follows a family—the Joads—through their treacherous journey from Oklahoma to California. It depicts the struggles they face trying to survive in a land where oranges were supposed to be plentiful for the taking. However, The Grapes of Wrath is much more than a restatement of American history. It is a penetratingly tragic reality that awakens the human heart....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck]
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Grapes of Wrath - Because of the devastating disaster of the dust bowl, the Joad family was forced to leave their long-time home and find work and a new life elsewhere. They, like many other families, moved to California. "The land of milk and honey". The people in the dust bowl imagined California as a haven of jobs where they would have a nice little white house and as much fruit as they could eat. This dream was far from the reality the migrant farmers faced once in California. The dreams, hopes, and expectations the Joads had of California were crushed by the reality of the actual situation in this land of hate and prejudice....   [tags: essays research papers] 1194 words
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Grapes Of Wrath - Released from an Oklahoma state prison after serving four years of a manslaughter conviction, Tom Joad makes his way back to his family’s farm amid the desolation of the Dust Bowl. He meets Jim Casy, a former preacher who gave up his calling out of a belief that all life is holy, and that simply being among the people as an equal is a sacred endeavor. Jim accompanies Tom to his home; when they find it deserted, fronted by withered crops, they travel to Tom’s Uncle John’s house, where they find the Joads preparing for a long trip to California in search of work....   [tags: essays research papers] 779 words
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The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck and To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - “And they [migrants] stand still and watch the potatoes float by, listen to the screaming pigs being killed in a ditch and covered with quicklime, watch the mountains of oranges slop down to a putrefying ooze; and in the eyes of the people there is a failure; and in the eyes of the hungry there is a growing wrath” (Steinbeck 349). John Steinbeck, the author of The Grapes of Wrath, portrays the migrant’s resentment of the California land owners and their way of life and illustrates that the vagrants from Oklahoma are yearning for labor, provisions, and human decency....   [tags: Humanity's Ethics, Crisis]
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John Ford's Film is Almost The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - ... Cutting characters is a regular occurrence in filmmaking, but in a novel like The Grapes of Wrath it takes away from the message of growing kinship. The idea of family plays a huge role in this novel. The Joad’s most important goal is the keep “the family unbroke.” Yet, the film only gives characters important to the novel a superficial glance. Pa, Uncle John and Rose of Sharon are set in the background with little characterization. Noah Joad literally disappears between one scene and the next with no explanation given....   [tags: dust bowl, migrants, relatioships]
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Comparing The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck and To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee - “And they stand still and watch the potatoes float by, listen to the screaming pigs being killed in a ditch and covered with quicklime, watch the mountains of oranges slop down to a putrefying ooze; and in the eyes of the people there is a failure; and in the eyes of the hungry there is a growing wrath” (Steinbeck 349). John Steinbeck, the author of The Grapes of Wrath, portrays the migrant’s resentment of the California land owners and their way of life and illustrates that the vagrants from Oklahoma are yearning for labor, provisions, and human decency....   [tags: Good vs. Evil]
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The American Dream in Of Mice and Men and The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - The American Dream is something that many Americans, as well as people from all over the world, strive to accomplish. Although it has progressed over time, many people still want to grasp a hold of it. John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men and The Grapes of Wrath represent the struggle of migrant workers and the unrealistic concept of the American dream. Steinbeck illustrates the impossibility of the American Dream in the 1930s through George and Lennie in Of Mice and Men, and through the Joads in The Grapes of Wrath....   [tags: working hard, financial stability] 1017 words
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The Role of Female Characters in American Literature: The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath - For readers who observe literature through a feminist lens, they will notice the depiction of female characters, and this makes a large statement on the author’s perception of feminism. Through portraying these women as specific female archetypes, the author creates sense of what roles women play in both their families and in society. In books such as The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck and The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the roles that the main female characters play are, in different instances, both comparable and dissimilar....   [tags: John Steinbeck, F. Scott Fitzgerald, feminism]
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Dignity and Transformation in the Face of Tragedy in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - ... The Joads and Jim travel from migrant camp to migrant camp, where the struggle for survival is placed in sharp relief as man must turn against man in a sickening Darwinistic environment. The characters suffer breakdowns, the father retreating from his role as a leader, the mother enduring the tragedy in silence, and Tom questioning what the point of his life even is. The climax of the struggle occurs as Jim is murdered by a police officer, who Tom then kills. In the absence of the group’s spiritual leader, Tom steps up and joins together a large group of migrants to fight for better conditions, finding his purpose as a man of the people and leaving the Joad family on his own....   [tags: church, transformation. migrant]
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Comparing The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck and The Crucible, by Arthur Miller - The Grapes of Wrath, written by John Steinbeck, is a novel depicting life during the Dust Bowl, while The Crucible, written by Arthur Miller is a semi-fiction version of the Salem Witch Trials. Despite these vast differences they both share three main character dependant themes. The sorrow of regret, the destruction of one’s religion, and the greed of some at the expense of many. The sadness that emits from sorrow is one of the main occurrences in these novels. The Crucible is a story about a false accusation of civilians committing witchcraft which ends up creating massive hysteria due to the trials having a misled judge....   [tags: Comparative, John Steinbeck, Arthur Miller]
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Love between Social Classes in The Grapes of Wrath and The Great Gatsby - Of all the archetypes of American literature, none presents such radically evolved ideas as the Modernism movement. Its overarching concepts remain in flux and provide contrasting glimpses of multitudes of topics; however, just as many of its central tenets remain unchanged between novels, years, and the digression from form that humanity’s modern culture condones. The ideas and concepts that John Steinbeck and F. Scott Fitzgerald put forth in their novels, The Grapes of Wrath and The Great Gatsby, are not exceptions....   [tags: John Steinbeck, F. Scott Fitzgerald ]
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Comparing and Contrasting the Novel and Movie Version of The Grapes of Wrath - Comparing and Contrasting the Novel and Movie Version of The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck wrote the The Grapes of Wrath in 1939 to rouse its readers against those who were responsible for keeping the American people in poverty. The Grapes of Wrath tells the story of the Joad family, migrant farmers from Oklahoma traveling to California in search of an illusion of prosperity. The novel's strong stance stirred up much controversy, as it was often called Communist propaganda, and banned from schools due to its vulgar language....   [tags: Movie Film comparison compare contrast] 956 words
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A Comparison of Camaraderie in Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men - Camaraderie in The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men       The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men, two novels published concurrently by John Steinbeck, both depict camaraderie between dust bowl migrants. The main characters in Of Mice and Men, George and Lennie, form a bond, while struggling to reach their goal, a small farm. Similarly, Jim Casy of The Grapes of Wrath befriends Tom Joad, a friendship eventually uplifting the whole migrant community. Outwardly, the two relationships may seem to parallel each other....   [tags: compare and contrast essay examples]
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In The Grapes of Wrath, the Joad family is forced to continually migrate - In The Grapes of Wrath, the Joad family is forced to continually migrate because they lose the land that their family has inhabited for generations. Ownership does not reside in legal title but in personal experience. In The Grapes of Wrath, the Joad family is forced to continually migrate because they lose the land that their family has inhabited for generations. Despite the fact that they never owned the land, they feel it is theirs because no one else knows it as well as they do. When they reach California, they experience the position of being the outsiders, such as the banks they despised were in Oklahoma....   [tags: English Literature] 502 words
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Exploring The American Dream in Great Gatsby and Grapes of Wrath - The 1920s and 1930s represent two decades in our country's history that were very much connected to one another but extremely different in terms of economy. The Great Gatsby takes place during the roaring 20s, a time of extravagant parties and attempts at finding happiness after World War I. On the other hand, The Grapes of Wrath takes place during the 30s while America is suffering from the Great Depression and people are leaving their homes and lives to find success and work in California. Although the times were very different economically, both were dominated by people striving for the American Dream of wealth and social status in an attempt of obtaining happiness, success, and a better...   [tags: Comparative Literature] 1173 words
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The Use of Symbolism in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck - The Use of Symbolism in The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck The Grapes of Wrath is a novel by John Steinbeck that in my opinion illustrates the terrible conditions under which the migratory farm families of America during the 1930's were forced to live under. This novel in a very descriptive and emotional way tells of one family's migration west to California from Oklahoma (the Joad family) through the great economic depression of the 1930's. The story revolves around the family having to abandon their home and their livelihood....   [tags: Papers] 1067 words
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Oppression in Sinclair's The Jungle and Steinbeck's The Grapes Of Wrath - Oppression in Sinclair's The Jungle and Steinbeck's The Grapes Of Wrath In The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair, and The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck, the characters are forced with economic, social, and political problems that they must cope with throughout the story. Both books are similar in that they emphasize that in this country, one simply cannot win unless they play by nature’s rules.      The economic problems of both stories were great. Jurgis (The Jungle) wishes to go to America to get rich....   [tags: Sinclair The Jungle] 450 words
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Comparing The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck - Comparing The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck John Ernst Steinbeck's novels The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men share many common themes such as dependancy, survival and unity. Although subtle, the most intriguing link between these two novels is Steinbecks infatuation with the human soul. He delves deep into the human heart and pulls forth very strong emotions such as devotion, compassion and sympathy. These feelings are what propel Steinbecks novels forward. It is through the microcosmic relationship of George and Lennie, in Of Mice and Men, and the social macrocosm of the migrants, in The Grapes of Wrath , that Steinbeck illustrates the limitless reaches on...   [tags: Papers] 902 words
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Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath vs. Sinclair’s The Jungle - Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath vs. Sinclair’s The Jungle The global appeal of the so-called American dream of happiness and success has drawn many people to the “promised land” for hundreds of years. Although the American government preached equality for all on paper, it was driven primarily by money. Both Upton Sinclair and John Steinbeck recognized this and used literature to convey the flaws of capitalism. Sinclair’s The Jungle satirized America’s wage slavery at the turn of the century and forty years later, Steinbeck’s novel The Grapes of Wrath criticized the commercialism of American farming....   [tags: compare Contrast Rhetoric Essays] 1886 words
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A classic example of socialism is John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath - A classic example of socialism is John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath The idea of socialism has transcended down in history; from the proletariat fighting for rights in France to Marxist revolutions and Leninists in Russia. Socialism is the helping of the laboring class; more so it is the uprising and asserting of power of the laboring class. A classic example of socialism is John Steinbeck's "The Grapes of Wrath". Many people thought this book was an attack on America, due to it's social views....   [tags: English Literature:] 2442 words
(7 pages)
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Movie Version of Grapes Of Wrath - The People and the Depression - Movie: The Grapes Of Wrath - The people and the Depression In the movie The grapes of Wrath, the Joads undergo the hit of the depression, they have to leave their farm. They go to California for jobs, but find there are few jobs, and it pays little, or at least less then what they were told. The government tried to start programs to house and employ people like the Joads. Since the people who already lived in the cities in which these developments were put didn't want them there anyway, they tried to start a riot and have the police Arrest them....   [tags: Movie Film comparison compare contrast] 781 words
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Grapes Of Wrath: How It Relates To The Romance Archetype - Grapes of Wrath By John Steinbeck A RETURN TO PARIDISE How does California seem to modern America. Violent. Crowded. Filled with bad people. People who live in cities and have lost touch with the earth. These people are portrayed in John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath as Californians. Yet, people from the Midwest flocked to California seeking prosperity and opportunity. Their land had been taken by the banks and turned into cotton fields. They were left homeless and desperate. These people sought to work in the fields where they could eat a peach or sit under a tree to relax....   [tags: essays research papers] 1610 words
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Broken Stereotypes in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath - Broken Stereotypes in The Grapes of Wrath Masculinity and femininity are not restricted to two separate and distinct groups.  In reality, they are different within themselves, and similar to each other. It is a well-known stereotype that men are tough and strong with no emotions, while women are weak and need to be supported. The characters in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath are examples of the typical masculine and feminine groups.  However, the book also contains models of those who do not fit the stereotypes.  In general, the book contains two types of portrayals of both men and women....   [tags: Stereotypes Stereotyping ] 946 words
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