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Your search returned over 400 essays for "fourteenth amendment"
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The Importance of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution - The importance of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution is such that some have called it the amendment that “completed the Constitution.” When it was ratified on July 9th, 1868, the amendment became one of legislative cornerstones of the Reconstruction Era, a time in which the Radical Republicans, led by John A. Bingham and Thaddeus Stevens, promulgated a legislative program focused on providing racial equality before the law. Among the laws passed in the Reconstruction Era, the Fourteenth Amendment was one of the most controversial, with one Republican congressman, Representative A.J....   [tags: reconstruction era, 14th amendment]
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2896 words
(8.3 pages)
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The Fourteenth Amendment - On a date that will be remembered forever as a step forward for our nation, July 28, 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution. The Fourteenth Amendment gave a new sense of hope and inspiration to a once oppressed people. It was conceived to be the foundation for restoring America to its great status and prosperity. The Amendment allowed “equal protection under the law”, no matter what race, religion, sex, sexual preference or social status. It was designed to protect the newly freed slaves....   [tags: Racism Equality Constitution Essays] 762 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Fourteenth Amendment and Equality Under the Law - The Fourteenth Amendment and Equality Under the Law The Fourteenth Amendment was adopted in 1868 as one of the longest amendments to the Constitution with five parts in total. The most significant part is section one. In the very first sentence of section one, . All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, as citizens of the United States and of the state where in they reside. citizenship was universalized. The Amendment was designed to prohibit state governments from curtailing the rights of former slaves after the Civil War, however it has been used to grant all of the personal liberties and rights conveyed in the Bill of Rights....   [tags: Papers 14th Amendment History Essays ] 776 words
(2.2 pages)
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Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution - The Fourteenth Amendment What amendment to the United States constitution is considered to be illegally ratified. What amendment both grants the right to vote to men and then takes away that right to vote. If you answered the fourteenth amendment to both questions you would be right. Although most people think of the fourteenth amendment as being a "civil rights" amendment, it also defines citizenship, voting rights, and states congressional representatives and electors numbers. In this paper I will talk about how the passage of the fourteenth amendment was a relevant event in history, how it impacts our country today, how it is viewed as the civil rights amendment in our textbook, how it h...   [tags: Political Science] 1434 words
(4.1 pages)
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Linda Brown vs. Board of Education of Topeka - 1868 marked a proud year for African Americans with the passage of the Fourteenth Amendment to Constitution. It proclaimed that “no state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”1 This essentially color blinded government, and granted all citizens (a category which finally included African Americans) what is described in the document as indisputable equality....   [tags: the Fourteenth Amendment] 1172 words
(3.3 pages)
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The US Constitution: The Difficulty of Adding an Amendment - The United States Constitution is considered to be more concise as well as much older than the constitutions of other nations worldwide. Although the United States Constitution is mature, there are such a limited number of amendments that have been added to the Constitution since it was created. Only twenty-seven amendments, including the Bill of Rights, have been added to the Constitution since its creation. This is not due to amendments not being suggested, because over eleven thousand amendments have been contemplated; however, this is because the process of adding an amendment to the Constitution is an extremely long and difficult process....   [tags: american history, amendment]
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1000 words
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The Fourteenth Ammendment and the Fight for Equal Rights - By the summer of 1865, the United States of America emerged from one struggle directly into another. After years of tension over state rights and slavery, the nation had exploded into a civil war, only to emerge bloodied but still intact. The question now was how to keep the nation intact, while protecting the freedmen and ensuring that the same powers that had ignited the war could come back to power. To Garrett Epps argues in his book Democracy Reborn: The Fourteenth amendment and the Fight for Equal Rights in Post-Civil War America that the 14th Amendment passed by the 39th Congress of the United States was the penultimate reaction to ensure that recently freed slaves were guaranteed the...   [tags: Post-Civil War America]
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1114 words
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Fifth Amendment and Double Jeopardy - Fifth Amendment and Double Jeopardy Double jeopardy is the prosecution of a person for an offense for which he or she has already been prosecuted. The double jeopardy clause, which is in the Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution, was designed to protect an individual from being subject to trials and possible convictions more then once for an alleged offense. The idea was not to give the State too much over the individual, this way no individual will be subject to embarrassment, expense, and ordeal against being tried for an alleged offense more then once....   [tags: Law Legal 5th Amendment] 1616 words
(4.6 pages)
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Against the Federal Marriage Amendment - Against the Federal Marriage Amendment The word marriage means many things to many different people. To some people marriage is a religious ceremony, and should remain a religious union, without any interaction by the government. For others marriage is a legal contract, which should benefit both parties involved in the marriage. According Wikipedia.com, most people define marriage as “(1) the state of being united to a person of the opposite sex as a husband or wife in a consensual and contractual relationship recognized by law (2) the state of being united to a person of the same sex in a relationship like that of the traditional relationship.” Not only has the type of contract marriage i...   [tags: civil liberties, rhetorical essays] 1719 words
(4.9 pages)
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The Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution - Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. Eighth Amendment, 1791 The Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution limits the punishments that may be imposed by the government on American citizens. These limits are compulsory among the states by way of the Fourteenth Amendment. The English Bill of Rights of 1689 expressed concern with arbitrary and disproportionate sanctions, giving way to the Founders inclusion of the prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment....   [tags: U.S. Law]
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1711 words
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The Second Amendment vs Gun Control - President Barack Obama says we have an “obligation” to try anything that could save one child, but many people find this statement to be ridiculous. Gun control is thought of as a government policy or regulations to control or limit the sale and use of firearms. In the U.S. constitution, the 2nd Amendment states that a well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed. Inside America today, gun control is a major issue, especially in the political arena....   [tags: Gun Control Essays]
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1515 words
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The First Amendment to the United States Constitution - December 15, 1791 the First Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech." At an absolute minimum, the Establishment Clause was intended to prohibit the federal government from declaring and financially supporting a national religion, such as existed in many other countries at the time of the nation's founding (University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2011)....   [tags: American History] 2214 words
(6.3 pages)
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Abortion and the Privacy Amendment - Abortion and the Privacy Amendment A U.S. citizen's "right to privacy" was first discussed in an 1890 Harvard Law Review article in which two Boston lawyers, Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren, defined it as "the right to be let alone." Since then, the right to privacy has provided the basis for a stream of revolutionary and controversial constitutional interpretations by courts across the United States, culminating in the U.S. Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision in 1973. Although decisions have come down in favor of a right to privacy, they are largely based on a broad and disputed interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Topics] 807 words
(2.3 pages)
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Flag Burning and the First Amendment -    Your First Amendment rights are extremely close to being violated by none other than the United States Congress. I refer to the Flag Desecration Bill that, if passed, would do irreparable damage to our right to free speech and undermine the very priniciples for which the American flag stands. Fortunately, West Virginians have an ally in Sen. Robert C. Byrd. Sen. Byrd, who previously favored the bill, now fights to protect our rights by stopping the passage of this bill. I applaud his stand and want to reinforce his position....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Topics]
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2111 words
(6 pages)
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Reflections On The First Amendment - Reflections on the First Amendment On December 15th, 1971, the first X amendments to the Constitution went into affect. The first X amendments to the constitution were known as the Bill of Rights. The First Amendment was written by James Madison because the American people were demanding a guarantee of their freedom. The First Amendment was put into place to protect American’s freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of assembly and freedom of petition. The First Amendment was written as follows; “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people...   [tags: Political Science] 1819 words
(5.2 pages)
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14th Amendment -EQUAL PROTECTION UNDER THE LAW - EQUAL PROTECTION UNDER THE LAW In school especially, as well as throughout our daily lives, we learn in America to live by the idea of freedom and equality for all. We do not allow race, class, or creed to determine a person’s stature in the community. It may seem as if this is the standard of society, but these ideas of equality have been fought over since the beginning of written history, and even in America today, prejudice still exists. To address these and similar problems, the founding fathers of this nation created a Constitution which included laws that dealt with individual freedoms....   [tags: essays research papers] 925 words
(2.6 pages)
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Mapp v. Ohio Fourth Amendment Case - Mapp v. Ohio: Controversy of the Fourth Amendment Ms. Dollree Mapp and her daughter lived in Cleveland, Ohio. After receiving information that an individual wanted in connection with a recent bombing was hiding in Mapp's house, the Cleveland police knocked on her door and demanded entrance. Mapp called her attorney and subsequently refused to let the police in when they failed to produce a search warrant. After several hours of surveillance and the arrival of more officers, the police again sought entrance to the house....   [tags: essays research papers] 1291 words
(3.7 pages)
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Students Shoud NOT Have the Tight to Free Speech - According to the First Amendment Center, located at Vanderbilt University and at Washington, D.C.’s Newseum, there are twelve categories of speech that are not protected by First Amendment rights. These are: “obscenity, fighting words, defamation (libel, slander), child pornography, perjury, blackmail, incitement to imminent lawless action, true threats, solicitations to commit crimes, and plagiarism of copyrighted material” (para. 2). The center also adds that “some experts also would add treason, if committed verbally” (para....   [tags: first amendment, speech]
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2152 words
(6.1 pages)
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Freedom of Religion and Freedom of Expression: Tinker V. Des Moines - What if you were suspended from school because of something you were wearing. Not only was the clothing or item appropriate, it was something you were fighting for or something you believe is right. Is this fair or okay for this to happen. There is a specific incident that this situation happened to a few teenagers in Des Moines, Iowa in December of 1965. A group of students wanting to wear black armbands throughout the holiday season was in for a wake up call. (FORTAS) These plans and or idea were quickly shot down by the high school principals....   [tags: freedom, first amendment, rights]
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1390 words
(4 pages)
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Is Flag Burning Protected by the First Amendment? - Is Flag Burning Protected by the First Amendment.          Can an individual be prosecuted for openly burning the American flag in a political protest. Gregory Johnson did this in a political protest outside Dallas City Hall. He was then tried and convicted of desecrating a venerated object under a Texas law (Penal Code 42.09), which states that "a person commits an offense if he intentionally or knowingly desecrates a state or national flag" (317). The question of whether this Texas law is in violation of the First Amendment, which "holds that Congress shall make no law......   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Topics]
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2205 words
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Curfews Should Be Eliminated - “A society that will trade a little liberty for a little order will lose both, and deserve neither.” ~ Thomas Jefferson. This quote epitomizes my position that curfews should be eliminated. Liberty is a concept in political philosophy that means human beings are able to govern themselves and behave according to their own free will. Curfews ignore the idea of liberty and have not proven themselves as a successful tool against juvenile crime and yet are popularly utilized throughout the United States....   [tags: Curfews Violate First Amendment Rights]
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1316 words
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Adair v. U.S. and Coppage v. Kansas Analysis - ... Oregon. In 1898, congress passed the Erdman Act, which prohibited employers from firing employees based on if they join a union. An employer for the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company, William Adair, violated the statute by firing O.B. Coppage for his participation in a labor organization. The court, in a 6 to 2 vote, held that the statute not only violated the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment, it also held that congress’s power over interstate commerce does not extend to memberships in unions....   [tags: lochner era, supreme court, fifth amendment] 654 words
(1.9 pages)
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What Role Should The Government Play in Gun Control? - What Role Should The Government Play in Gun Control. A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.      Gun control is a real issue with Americans today. Many people have different opinions about how to handle our growing dilemma concerning guns. There are those who believe we should ban guns altogether and those who believe we should not ban or restrict the people's right to own guns at all. Both sides have valid arguments, but neither side seems to know how to compromise because of their very different opinions....   [tags: Second Amendment The Right To Bear Arms]
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1801 words
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The Fisrt Amendment Analysis: Basic Freedom - The interpretation of the first amendment has been seen throughout our history and, it had either been incorporated in a manner of conservancy or alteration. The first amendment basically describes what congress was under limited power to and, our basic freedoms. However, the concern was never questioned if the state government can curb those liberties since during the ratification of the bill there was little concern of this even being true. This had proven to be reality later on with the various cases that questioned not only the first, but several other amendments....   [tags: first amendment, amendments, freedom] 617 words
(1.8 pages)
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Amendments to the Constitution - The framers of our Constitution knew that time has a way of changing countries and their citizens. Our country was in a whirlwind of change in 1789 as people were experiencing freedom from the tyranny of England for the first time in their lives. Our country was being molded and formed into a great nation by the founding fathers. Expectations and rules had to be set to protect the rights of the minorities and majorities. Amendments to the Constitution were written to ensure equality for all in changing times....   [tags: First Amendment, Second Amendment] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Codification of the Fourth Amendment - The most difficult problem that arises for the courts because of technology is the codification of the Fourth Amendment to apply to technological change and progress. The vast changes technology brings to surveillance, security, and data collection offer a challenge to courts in classifying these new technologies and monitoring their use within the limits of the Fourth Amendment. The Fourth Amendment states that people have the right to be “secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.” An influential dissent written by Louis Brandeis contends that the amendment does not simply protect a person’s property but the “right to be let alone.”...   [tags: technologicals change, privacy, amendment]
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1212 words
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The Fifth Amendment: Rights of Accused Suspects and Property Owners - “I plead the Fifth.” This well-known expression is used by an individual who refuses to answer a question that may incriminate him. This phrase references the Fifth Amendment to the Bill of Rights (Brezina 15). The Bill of Rights protects the fundamental rights of Americans, including the rights of free speech, freedom of the press and freedom of religion (Teitelbaum 8). The Fifth Amendment in the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of a person accused of committing a crime (Teitelbaum 15)....   [tags: The Fifth Amendment]
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2619 words
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Current Fourth Amendment Jurisprudence - Introduction The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was drafted by the Framers to protect the right to be free from governmental intrusion. Without a warrant and probable cause, an officer may not enter a home and search it. The use of GPS technology, however, enables the government to collect the same information without ever leaving the office. Thus, GPS based surveillance presents the issue of what protection the Fourth Amendment offers. Current Fourth Amendment jurisprudence offers little protection from warrantless surveillance....   [tags: Fourth Amendment, Rights, United States] 1599 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Right to Keep and Bear Arms in the USA - ... With 88.8 firearms for every one-hundred people legislation in favor of gun rights is also present. Nunn v. Georgia was one of the earliest court cases that ruled that gun control legislation was unconstitutional. The Georgia Supreme Court of 1846 perfectly encompassed the case at hand when the publicized their opinion on the Second amendment when the announced ““The right of the whole people, old and young, men, women and boys, and not militia only, to keep and bear arms…and finally incorporated conspicuously in our own Magna Carta!” in Heller V....   [tags: Guns, Laws, Ammendment]
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813 words
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Benefits of the Second Amendment - After a long, exhausting, painful war for independence from Great Britain, the United States became its own nation, a nation of choice and rights, a nation of voice and strong opinion, a nation with freedom handed to humans by God. The birth of this glorious new state brought forth a new era of revolution throughout the world. Countries took America’s victory to heart, overthrowing their monarchial governments and establishing governments run by popular sovereignty. The existence of the United States, perhaps, led to the global fight for self-government....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms]
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844 words
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Amendments that Make U.S. Citizens Equal - Wouldn’t it be wrong if the women in the United States could not vote. Aren’t elections about coming together as equal United States citizens to vote for a candidate. The 19th amendment of the US Constitution states, “All US female citizens have the right to vote”. Men and women were not treated as equal Americans. The 19th amendment gave women the same rights as men. The 15th amendment of the US Constitution states, “ The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” Freedom and equal right amendments are important because they represent what America stands f...   [tags: 15th amendment, freedom, 19th amendment] 656 words
(1.9 pages)
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Americans and Cubans Approaches to the Platt Amendment - The U.S.’s relationship with Cuba has been arduous and stained with mutual suspicion and obstinateness, and the repeated U.S. interventions. The Platt agreement and Castro’s rise to power, served to introduce the years of difficulty to come, while, the embargo the U.S. placed on Cuba, enforced the harsh feelings. The two major events that caused the most problems were the Bays of Pigs and Cuban Missile Crisis. In 1903, the U.S. published the Platt Amendment, which was a set of guidelines for Cuba to follow (Blight 165)....   [tags: Americans, Cubans, Platt Amendment, Cuba, USA, ] 1533 words
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The First Amendment of the United States Constitution - The United States Constitution was signed on September 17th, 1787. It did not include a bill of rights and it did not include their freedoms. And so, on September 25, 1789 Congress passed the first ten amendments, which were later ratified on December 15, 1791. The Bill of Rights was created by the Founding Fathers with the intent of restricting the powers of the new national government. The Bill of Rights, however, consists of 10 amendments. The first of the amendments was written because the people at America’s establishment wanted their basic freedoms guaranteed....   [tags: amendments, bill of rights, citizen freedom]
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1064 words
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Article V of the U.S. Constitution and the Amendments that Shaped America - The Articles of Confederation at one point was our only set of guidelines for our country, “in 1787 Congress scheduled a meeting to reform the Articles of Confederation”(Losco,Baker 22). “However; James Madison who is also known as the Father of the Constitution, had a different idea, to throw out the Articles of Confederation and construct something different” (Losco,Baker 23). According to Smith and Spaeth “in 1789 the Constitution was ratified, and then in 1791 the Bill of Rights was added” (Smith,Spaeth)....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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1651 words
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The Eighth Amendment - The 8th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States prohibits cruel and unusual punishment, as well as the setting of excessive bail or the imposition of excessive fines. However, it has also been deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States (according to the Eighth Amendment)to inflict physical damage on students in a school environment for the purpose of discipline in most circumstances. The 8th Amendment stipulates that bail shall not be excessive. This is unclear as to whether or not there is a constitutional right to bail, or only prohibits excessive bail, if it is to be granted....   [tags: Eighth Amendment Essays]
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The Failed Ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment in the U.S. - The ERA was introduced in every Congress since 1923, and yet it still failed to gain ratification. The ERA was the Equal Rights Amendment, which means that equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. I believe it was never passed because of many reasons. One reason was because some ERA supports got offended by other supports who were very obnoxious, which was a backlash on feminist tactics. (Doc. E & F) Another is that men and women might switch places, and it would be a threat to traditional roles.(Doc....   [tags: Equal Rights Amendment, USA, feminism, ] 460 words
(1.3 pages)
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United States Constitution: Amendment Process - The United States constitution has an amendment process that has been included in the Bill of Rights. The amendment allows Americans to make changes on the September 17, 1789 United States Constitution was ratified and made law. The amendment of the Bill of rights has made America to continue growing in prosperity through the years and to become one of the most powerful nations in the world. The United States constitution was created with an amendment in Article V. This amendment process allows the constitution to adapt to the changes in the American society....   [tags: bill of rights, bear firearms, amendments]
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1026 words
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Will We Follow Lincoln's Advice? The Fourth Amendment - “Don't interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties.” Abraham Lincoln made this statement in referring to the emancipation of the slaves. Even though the statement has nothing to deal with the Fourth Amendment, or the Search and Seizure laws within the Constitution, what is stated still brings about a good point relating to the Constitution. The fact being brought out of this quote is that the Constitution’s purpose is to safeguard Americans’ liberties....   [tags: Fourth Amendment, Abraham Lincoln, presidents, con] 1363 words
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The Controversy of the Second Amendment of the Constitution - I. INTRODUCTION: The Second Amendment to the Constitution(Second Amendment) of the United States of America(USA) is one of the most controversial. The Second Amendment specifically grants that, "the right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed" The way that an individual interprets the wording of the Second Amendment influences their point of view on who has the right to "keep and bear arms" (Amendment 2). The controversy brought on by the Second Amendment is because the Second Amendment does not clearly define whom "the people" are....   [tags: Bear Arms Second Amendment USA] 997 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Second Amendment of the Constitution - The Second Amendment “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” This timeless phrase, the Second Amendment of the United States’ Constitution, is an enduring example of the principles and ideals that our country was founded on. With this statement, the founders of this country explicitly and perpetually guaranteed the American individual the right to keep and bear arms. An incomparably crucial element of this country‘s origins, the Second Amendment and the rights it guarantees have proved vital to the growth and success of our nation....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms] 503 words
(1.4 pages)
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First Amendment Rights, Privacy and the Paparazzi - First Amendment Rights, Privacy and the Paparazzi The question of paparazzi threatening privacy and First Amendment rights is often to situational to argue in a conventional manner, but certainly there are many facets of the issue which can be addressed in a quite straightforward manner. Celebrities who feel they have the right to privacy in public places often muddy the waters of this issue. Oddly enough, those celebrities who have chosen to speak out against what they feel are violations of their privacy most always begin their campaigns with a large press conference....   [tags: First Amendment Right to Privacy] 666 words
(1.9 pages)
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Fourteenth Century Art - One can learn a great deal about fourteenth century art by observing and analyzing the subjects ,the central and main focus of the art works at this period.The main subject religion ,in particular Christianity was flourishing in Europe at this time . Christianity was the central and dominate power politically and religiously.Political leaders ruled under a theocratic government.Every aspect of life revolved around religion;Education domestic,and social.Any work of art paintings or architectural,communicates these historical significance in fourteenth century Europe.Before man learned to write they learned how To draw and make art so it's only natural they recorded their history th...   [tags: Christ, altarpiece, Europe] 678 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Decline in Catholic Authority in the Fourteenth Century - For centuries historians have argued about what might have caused the decline in the fourteenth century Roman Catholic Church, and whether it was related to the Great Western Schism, or the Black Death and famine. While each of these events were devastating to Europe at the time, the majority of decline in authority and power of the church and pope lie within the anomaly of the Great Western Schism. According to much research a divide in power of the Catholic Church led to two strongly opposing popes claiming legitimacy....   [tags: Great Western Schism] 987 words
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Gun Control: Should the Second Amendment of the Constitution be Updated? - According to the F.B.I., 14,369 murders involving firearms took place in the year 2013 within the United States. We as Americans have the right to “bear arms,” however there can be some changes to at least try to minimize these casualties. The 2nd Amendment states “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a Free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” This may be outdated now that we have a strong military (that is our “well regulated Militia,”) to protect our security, but can a right be scratched off the Constitution because of someone’s interpretation....   [tags: Second Amendment The Right To Bear Arms] 1187 words
(3.4 pages)
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The Importance of the First Amendment of the United States’ Bill of Rights for Democratic Government and its Citizens - Being expression one of the most important rights of the people to maintain a connected society right to speech should be accepted to do so. The first amendment is one of the most fundamental rights that individuals have. It is fundamental to the existence of democracy and the respect of human dignity. This amendment describes the principal rights of the citizens of the United States. If the citizens were unable to criticize the government, it would be impossible to regulate order. By looking freedom of speech there is also freedom of assembly and freedom of press that are crucial for the United States democracy. According to the “Derechos, Human Rights”, freedom of speech is one of the most...   [tags: First Amendment, USA, Bill of Rights, Democracy, G] 780 words
(2.2 pages)
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4th Amendment - 4th Amendment In the late 1700's the 4th Amendment was written because of strong objections to the Writs of Assistance or general warrants. The Writs Assistance gave officials the right to enter any home and seize belongings without a reasonable cause. (Grolier Encyclopedia) The 4th amendment was ratified in the Bill of Rights on December 15, 1771. This amendment protects the people's right to privacy and security. (Encarta Online) The Fourth Amendment states, 'The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affi...   [tags: Government Constitution Amendments History Essays] 1098 words
(3.1 pages)
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Persuasive Essay: Gun Control Contradicts the Second Amendment - Gun control has been a hot topic for very long time. People on the anti- gun control side believe that gun ownership is a Constitutional right backed by the Second Amendment. The anti-gun believe that you should be able to posses and own any firearm. They also believe that gun laws only restrict the law abiding citizens. Pro-gun control believe that guns are the backbone to our crime problem. They also believe that gun laws help keep guns of the street and deter crime. The Second Amendment reads," A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed" (Caplan p32)....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms] 1288 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Second Amendment: Americans Have the Right to Bear Arms! - The United States Constitution says that U.S. Citizens have the right to bear arms. Even though this guarantee was written with no constraints, there are now laws that limit certain aspects of gun ownership. The reasons for gun control fall under the flag of public safety. Though there are many safety reasons why private ownership of firearms should be banned, these arguments are outweighed not only by the need for protection, but because the limitation of ownership rights could become dangerous to personal freedom....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms] 2373 words
(6.8 pages)
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Desire of the Fourteenth Century Women - Desire of the Fourteenth Century Women Is not what we desire, the most hard to get. It has always been this way. Unfortunately, women’s rights and abilities have been underestimated over the centuries. In the fourteenth century, the status and condition of a European woman depended on her husband’s position. Women had to endure arranged marriages, abuse and male dominance. During that time, Geoffrey Chaucer wrote The Canterbury Tales and taught us about one extraordinary woman whose name is Dame Alisoun....   [tags: Feminist Feminism Anglo Saxon Essays]
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862 words
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Fourteenth Century Society in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales - Nothing gives us a better idea of medieval life than Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. Written in the late fourteenth century in the vernacular, it gives us an idea of the vast spectrum of people that made up the different classes within society. The poem describes the knightly class, the clergy, and those who worked for a living, thus describing the different classes as well. Chaucer gives us a cross-section of fourteenth century society by giving us the small details of people’s clothing, demeanor and professions; therefore giving us information on the lower and middle classes, not discussed in literature before....   [tags: The Canterbury Tales Essays]
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Argumentative Essay: Gun Control Violates The Second Amendment of the Constitution - The U.S. should not have gun control laws. The Second Amendment to the Constitution states that, “A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” This amendment has been around since 1791, and there has been gun control almost as long as it's been around. The National Rifle Association is an advocate of the Second Amendment and an opponent of those who propose restrictions on guns. Even Presidents Reagan and Bush are members, and Nixon, Eisenhower, and Kennedy were also members....   [tags: Second Amendment The Right To Bear Arms] 384 words
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Argumentative Essay: Gun Control Violates The Second Amendment of the Constitution - Civilian ownership of firearms has for more than two hundred years been the very cornerstone upon which the liberty of the public has been supported. The very reason that Americans have never suffered a tyranny on the scale of Nazi-Germany has been due to the proliferation of firearms in the hands of the general public. The Second Amendment to the Bill of rights of the United States Constitution states "A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed." In order to understand that right, the modern reader must understand the semantics of the eighteenth century....   [tags: Second Amendment The Right To Bear Arms] 977 words
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Furman v. Georgia Case - In Furman V. Georgia, 408 U.S. 238, 92 S. Ct. 2726, 33 L. Ed.2d. 346, (1972) the issue brought before the Supreme Court was, “Did the death penalty, as it was administered at the time violate the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution.” The Supreme Court agreed to hear the case, and certiorari was granted but limited to the following question. “Does the imposition and carrying out of the death penalty in these three cases constitute cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments?” Furman, a black, 26 year old, confessed that he did not know that he had shot or killed the homeowner; all he was trying to do was escape from the house he had set out to burglar...   [tags: U.S. Supreme Court, Amendments] 824 words
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The First Amendment - The First Amendment is the first section of the Bill of Rights and is often considered the most important part of the U.S Constitution because it guarantees the citizens of United States the essential personal freedoms of religion, speech, press, peaceful assembly and the freedom to petition the Government. Thanks to the rights granted by the First Amendment, Americans are able to live in a country where they can freely express themselves, speak their mind, pray without interference, protest in peace and where their opinions are taken into consideration, which is something not many other nationalities have the fortune of saying....   [tags: bill of rights, constitution, Madison]
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The Seventeenth Amendment - Written in 1787 at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, and later ratified by the thirteen original states in 1788, the Constitution establishes the relationship between the federal (national) government and state governments. It establishes our republican form of government with an elected Executive (President), a bicameral congress (consisting of two legislative branches, a House of Representatives and a Senate), and a judicial system headed by a Supreme Court. The Framers' of the Constitution were influenced in their work by the ancient Athenians, the thinkers of the Enlightenment; Locke and Montesquieu....   [tags: U.S. Law, government, constitution] 1255 words
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The Second Amendment - “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.” This quote from Benjamin Franklin illustrates how an emphasis on safety can drastically reduce the freedoms enjoyed by citizens of the United States, especially the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution which states that “...the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” However, with active shooter situations such as Columbine; the Tucson, Arizona shootings, which nearly killed former Representative Gabrielle Giffords; and recent situations at Newtown, Connecticut; Los Angeles International Airport; and Westfield Garden State Plaza mall in New Jersey...   [tags: Constitution, US, gun control, federal government]
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The First Amendment - America has been built on freedom throughout the years. Freedom to speak, freedom to choose, freedom to worship, and freedom to do just about anything you want within that of the law. America’s law has been designed to protect and preserve these freedoms. The First Amendment guarantees freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition. It assures citizens that the federal government shall not restrict freedom of worship. It specifically prohibits Congress from establishing an official, government supported church....   [tags: The Bill of Rights]
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The Second Amendment - “A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a Free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” - Second Amendment. Throughout history, this sentence of twenty seven words has caused an intense debate. The polemic is that some people claim that a gun control policy is unconstitutional, while others disagree and even say it is necessary in order to reduce crime. Now, what does gun control mean. If it means to analyze who is responsible enough to own a gun by a “Universal Background Check”; that sounds right to everyone....   [tags: Gun Control, Check and Balance]
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The Prohibition Amendment - The Prohibition Amendment, which took effect on January 16, 1920, outlawed the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcohol in the United States and its territories, until its repeal on December 5, 1933. Today, Prohibition is often referred to as the “Noble Experiment” because it was created to reduce the adverse effects that alcohol had on families and society. Excessive consumption of alcohol, primarily by men, often resulted in domestic violence, poor work performance, and wasteful spending of wages on alcohol, which were needed to support families....   [tags: alcohol prohibition, crime]
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The First Amendment in Public Schools - The First Amendment was added to the Constitution in 1789 in order to secure individual rights to freedom of religion, speech, and the press in America. The First Amendment states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances” (Resources). Various government officials and supporters of constitutional rights of individuals have staunchly defended students’ First Amendment rights on public school property....   [tags: american politics, the constitution]
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The Title of Nobility Amendment - There are 33 amendments that have been offered up by Congress of those six flopped ratification by the mandatory three quarters of the state senates and four are officially still awaiting decision before state politicians. Beginning with the eighteenth amendment every amendment that was presented except for the nineteenth amendment and the still unresolved child labor amendment of 1924 has a definite time limit for ratification. There lies a mystery in the very first Thirteenth Amendment, the Titles of Nobility Amendment presented in 1810, which would have eliminated the citizenship of any American acquiring a title of nobility or honor from any foreign power or otherwise, the mystery is whe...   [tags: Disappearance, Citizenship, Time] 931 words
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Eighth Ammendment and the Twenty-Eighth Ammendment - U.S Constitution’s Eighth Amendment Since the ratification of the Eighth Amendment nearly two hundred and twenty two years ago, the citizens of the United States have been under constitutional protection from excessive bail, fines, and unusual or cruel punishment. The following examines and gives a brief analysis of the origination and history of the eighth amendment, along with the provisions/clauses contained within the amendment. In addition, I think an amendment requiring a limitation on immigration and immigration services should be added as the twenty-eighth amendment to the United States Constitution....   [tags: US Constitution, immigration, fines, bail]
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The Eighth Amendment and Death Penalty - The Eight Amendment to the U.S. Constitution “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishment inflicted”, proposed on 9/25/1789 and approved on 12/15/1791. The cruel and unusual punishment confines the harshness of penalties that state and federal governments may inflict upon ones who have been condemned of a criminal offense. The excessive fines phrase restricts the amount that state and federal governments may possibly fine an individual for a specific offense....   [tags: law, constitution, death penalty]
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The Social Value of 19th Amendment - The 19th Amendment recognized the right of women to participate in politics equally like men. Well, do you know when it was ratified. It was on August 8th, 1920, which is really recent. After more than seventy years of relentless work, women finally won the struggle. The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prevents the United States federal government and the states from denying the right of citizens to vote on the basis of their sex. In other words, it guarantees the right to vote for all Americans including blacks and women....   [tags: presidencial elections, civil war]
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The Fourth Amendment and Lawful Arrest - Reasonable suspicion can be found in the first clause of the Fourth Amendment (Siegel, 2012). It is considered the evidence necessary to prove that a crime has been committed (Siegel, 2012). There is not an exact minimum needed, however Justices have figured it has to fall below the evidence necessary to prove beyond a reasonable doubt of guilt needed in a trial (Siegel, 2012). This part of the Fourth Amendment is also included in the foggy understanding. There is a bias towards how this clause should be read and understood (Bloom, 2003)....   [tags: legal procedure, reasonable doubt]
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A Taxing Amendment, The Revenue Act - Before the 16th Amendment, a federal income tax was technically illegal, as stated in Article I, Section 9 of the Constitution : “No capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in proportion to the census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.” Therefore, the federal government had to rely on land sales, excise taxes, and tariffs to raise revenue. In times of crisis, however, these measures were simply not enough. During the Civil War, when the Union desperately needed funds, Congress passed the Revenue Act (1861), which included a provision for the nation’s first income tax....   [tags: supreme court, income tax]
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Freedom of Speech: The First Amendment - When the Constitution of the United States was ratified it mainly addressed the structure of the government with very few liberties for the individual. However, the states demanded a bill of rights that addressed the rights of the individuals as well. As a result, the Constitution began to adapt and change by adding amendments. Today the Bill of Rights still continues to change based on the will of the people and the judgment of the U.S. Supreme Court however, the core principles that our country was founded on has remained the same....   [tags: bill of rights, censorship]
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Revision of the Eighth Amendment - The Bill of Rights is a very important document to American citizens. The Bill of Rights is the beginning part of the American Constitution which is made of the first ten amendments which state our basic rights as United States’ citizens. It ensures us of our freedoms that cannot be taken away from us. However, I do believe that there is a certain amendment out of the ten that should be revised; this would be the Eighth Amendment. The Eighth Amendment reads “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishment inflicted.” (Legal Dictionary)....   [tags: Crimes, Bill of Rights]
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Reflection on the First Amendment - “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or the press, or the right of peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for the redress of grievances” (United States Constitution). In 1789 the anti-federalist main concern was that the Constitution’s lack of adequate guarantees for civil liberties. To provide such guarantees, the First Amendment along with the other nine Amendments known as the Bill of Rights were submitted to the states for ratification on September 25, 1789 and adopted on December 15, 1791....   [tags: US Government]
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The Amish and The First Amendment - When our forefathers were forming our new nation in 1776, they wrote the first amendment so that any religion, no matter what principles they are based on, would have equal rights in America. Opinions though, make the first amendment very difficult to be followed. People usually have one mind set, to follow what they believe and stereotype everyone else. “These stereotypes are the archenemies of learning” (Wagner 6). Learning is the basis of life. By stereotyping though, the less common religions, like Amish, are less noticed....   [tags: Religion]
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First Amendment: Protection of Privacy - As a private citizen, my privacy is very important, especially when in this new digital age; governmental agencies will use that information against you if they have a probable cause to. However, we are protected under the First and Fourth amendment, which gives us rights to speech, to drink or smoke in our homes without governmental intrusion. But when those rights are violated, we have the options to dispute those actions and if not satisfied with the results we can take it to the courts. But in order to do this we must limit what we say or do, in order to prevent these agencies from trying to impinge on our rights of liberty....   [tags: social media, constitutional rights] 906 words
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Overview Of The 14th Amendment - In order to protect the diverse races in this country, a new amendment was passed giving every natural born American or anyone naturalized in the United States the right to protection of the laws. Meaning, people that fell into the expectations were granted citizenship and states could not deprive citizens of their rights and privileges. Not everyone was included in the 14th Amendment. Immigrants and especially Native Americans were excluded while whites and African Americans were included. During the Gilded age immigrants were coming into the country and the 14th Amendment did not apply to them....   [tags: constitution, laws, american dream]
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First Amendment and Free Speech - This paper will examine the first amendment’s right to free speech based on three different Supreme Court cases and how there are varying examples of free speech. In the case of Snyder v. Phelps, Snyder sued Phelps, the Westboro Baptist Church, for intentional infliction of emotional distress, invasion of privacy by intrusion upon seclusion, and conspiracy because the church set-up protest outside of his military son’s funeral service (Chen et al., 2010). Another side of free speech involves a case which allow schools to restrict speech that is promoting illegal drug use....   [tags: Legal Precedent, Flag Burning]
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The 2nd Amendment and you - So you are sleeping and hear a loud crash, what sounds like your window breaking, and a door open. You call 911 and they say the police will be there in 15 minutes. You notice they have guns. What do you do. Me, being a gun activist, would roll over, grab my Benelli shotgun, and enforce the stand your ground policy. Unfortunately, If I had to use a force I would have it readily available. I look at it like if it was my life or the intruders, whose is more important. Well to me mine is. If you didn’t have a firearm though, chances are you would be dead by the time the police got to your house....   [tags: Bill of Rights, Guns, Laws, Bans]
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Bodium Castle and Development of Castles in Fourteenth Century - Bodium Castle and Development of Castles in Fourteenth Century "Bodium Castle shows today more than any other document, the way in which castle buildings had developed in the 14th century." Bodium castle was built in the 14th century by Sir Edward Dalyngrigge, a Sussex knight. He was given permission by King Richard II to do this and the castle was completed around 1388. Bodium castle was essentially a home but was later strengthened in fear of attack. The Site Bodium is built on a rectangular island set in a large moat....   [tags: Papers] 1732 words
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Enforcing the Second Amendment - With all the unpredictability in the world today many American citizens exercise their second amendment rights and choose to own a firearm to defend themselves, their families, and their property. Growth shows about four million new gun owners each year in the U.S. (Doherty 46 -47). Some research has shown that a 41% decline in violent crimes over the past two decades can be partly attributed to the lessening of firearm carrying laws, and that enabled lawful citizens to defend themselves (Doherty 46 -47)....   [tags: Role of Gun Laws]
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15th Amendment - In the latter half of the 18th century, freed slaves possessed the right to vote in all but three states. It was not until the 19th century that states began to pass laws to disenfranchise the black population. In 1850, only 6 out of the 31 states allowed blacks to vote. 1Following the civil war, three reconstruction amendments were passed. The first and second sought to end slavery and guarantee equal rights. The third, the 15th amendment, granted suffrage regardless of color, race, or previous position of servitude.2 The 15th Amendment monumentally changed the structure of American politics as it was no longer the privileged whites who could vote....   [tags: Racism] 1360 words
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Education Amendment - Over the years, the federal government has steadily been increasing its control of public education in the United States. The most notable developments of the last decade include the No Child Left Behind Act off 2001 and the ED Recovery Act, part of President Obama’s comprehensive recovery plan. As of September 30, 2010, $97.4 billion dollars was allocated under the ED Recovery Act (Department of Education). With the significant increase in federal interference, the American public should expect positive results....   [tags: Education ]
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Impact of the Ratification of the 13th Amendment on Commerce - Background Information on the Thirteenth Amendment: The 13th amendment to the United States’ constitution was introduced in order to free the slaves from slavery and make united states a free country by abolishing and prohibiting slavery. This amendment finalized the abolition of slave trade in the United States. The 13th amendment has its origin in the proposition made by Abraham Lincoln to his cabinet in relation to the freeing of all slaves in the rebellious states. It was proposed by the 38th congress of the United States and passed by the senate on 8th April 1864 before being adopted on the 6th of December in 1865 following the announcement of the secretary of state who declared it to h...   [tags: Slavery, Freedom Economics]
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The Sixth Amendment: Providing Justice for Everyone - The 6th Amendment: Providing Justice for Everyone Prior to the Revolutionary War, if the British accused a colonist of a crime, he would most likely receive an unfair trial and a prison sentence. When the Founding Fathers wrote the Bill of Rights, they believed that all Americans deserved rights which the British had not given them. The 6th Amendment provides many legal rights to United States citizens that protect them from being wrongly convicted of crimes. The 6th Amendment is the most important amendment in the Constitution of the United States....   [tags: Constitutional Rights] 716 words
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