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Your search returned over 400 essays for "crime and punishment"
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Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky - Slow slicing, or death by a thousand cuts, was a capital punishment in 900 A.D. China for those who committed brutal crimes, such as murder. In present day America, the use of lethal injection is one of many forms of capital punishment used to end the lives of an offender. It appears that people, throughout the centuries, have looked for a suitable way to punish a criminal. These punishments have a sole purpose, and that is to take the life of an offender. By taking the life of a wrong doer does not erase the crime nor does it help reform the criminal....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 765 words
(2.2 pages)
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Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky - In Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, the theme of duality and the conflict between personal desires and morals is present throughout much of the novel. There are dual conflicts: one external between a disillusioned individual and his world, and the other internal between an isolated soul and his inner thoughts. It is the internal conflict in the main character, Raskolnikov, that is the focused on for much of the novel. The first of Rodya’s two sides is his intellectual side. This side of rodya is inhumane, and exhibiting extreme self-will and power....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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898 words
(2.6 pages)
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Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky - Before the interactive oral, I noticed the numerous dreams and hallucinations in the novel Crime and Punishment, but I was not quite able to grasp the deeper meaning of some of the dreams and hallucinations. After this interactive oral, I see how important dreams are in this novel. They serve to illuminate the state of a character in a way that would not otherwise be clear. During this interactive oral, it was pointed out that the dreams in this novel are very influential to a character’s state of mind and actions....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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1580 words
(4.5 pages)
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Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky - In Fyodor Dostoevsky book Crime and Punishment, women at this time in Russia were not the equals of men in terms of education and power. In Crime and Punishment the women in the story were self-sacrificing in their actions, which in return paid off for the women. Majority of women, in Crime and Punishment, such as Sonya were selfless in their actions. The women in this story play a motherly role towards the men. Women in this story may have lived in a male dominated society, but it seemed that the words the women spoke in this story were very strong in influencing the men....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1938 words
(5.5 pages)
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Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment - Napoleon, Caesar, Aristotle, Washington, Rockefeller. These men have been a part of history for thousands of years. They are remembered for their flaws and triumphs, for their personalities and actions. Whether for good or for evil, they are, and will be, remembered. But then the question arises, are these men special. Do they deserve the remembrance that has been given to them. Are these the men who should be our role models. These questions are a central theme of Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1164 words
(3.3 pages)
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Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky - Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment was written in a regimented Russian society at a time when individuals were judged not by their character, but by their class and accordance with social institutions. The characters and foils in the novel vary in their social status as well as in their morals. Several characters that society respects for their position are shown to have little virtue, while others that are shunned are illustrated to be virtuous human beings. Thus Dostoevsky suggests that individuals must look beyond a person’s social status to value them as a person, in doing condemning the institutions that society holds dear....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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1310 words
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Crime and Punishment: Avoiding Punishment is Futile - Avoiding punishment is futile. Whether in the form of proper trials or through guilt, every person will come face to face with the consequences of their actions. Avoiding suffering only causes it to intensify. This is mainly demonstrated through Svidrigailov and Raskolnikov in the end of Crime and Punishment. Both men had been eluding their various torments and they realize the vanity of their avoidance after receiving crushing mental blows. Raskolnikov and Svidrigailov realize that the time has come to recognize suffering and responsibility for previous actions....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1259 words
(3.6 pages)
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Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky, like most authors, had a distinct way of conveying his message in his novel. In the case of Crime and Punishment Dostoevsky employs irregular plot pacing to develop the character of the protagonist, Raskolnikov, who undergoes quite a journey. Sounds like most books right. A man going through a journey and undergoing a transformation. The unique thing that has captivated many readers is a murder occurring in the early stages of the novel as opposed to being the climax towards the end of the novel....   [tags: Irregular Plot Placing, Crime and Punishment]
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1226 words
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Christianity in Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Fyodor Dostoyevsky wrote, It must have been a difficult task for Dostoevsky to come to this conclusion. He could be compared to that of the Prodigal son, who returned to God only after all other forms of belief were ventured. Being raised in a Russian Orthodox household, as a youth Dostoyevsky rebelled against religion and later began to believe in the anarchist and atheistic philosophy that was common among radical students and middle-class people that were against the status quo in 19th century Russia....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essay] 1514 words
(4.3 pages)
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Religion as Societal Conformity in Crime and Punishment - The central theme of Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky deals with conformity’s role in society. Dostoyevsky uses conformity to make Raskolnikov mentally ill and eventually turn himself in to face the punishment for his crimes. Religion influences every character in the book, but none more ardently than Raskolnikov. Understanding religion’s role as a force for conformity in Crime and Punishment provides a powerful insight into character motives and, furthermore, philosophical influences....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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1045 words
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The Psychological Dilemma in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - In Fyodor Dostoevsky’s drama, Crime and Punishment Rodion Romanovich Raskonlnikov exclaims, “I didn’t kill a human being, but a principle!” (Dostoevsky, 409). This occurs in part III, chapter VI of the novel when he’s battling with the confession of his murder he committed. In the beginning, Raskonlnikov, the protagonist of the novel, was a former student, struggling to get his life in order. He contemplates on whether he wants to assassinate his old land lady, Alyona Ivanovna, because he believes she was the cause for his debt....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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1062 words
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Analysis of Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky - One of the aspects of Crime and Punishment that stands out is that it is much more than a simple crime story. It is in fact a great study of the mind of a murder. Raskolnikov is a terrifying but sympathetic main character precisely because he is just twisted enough, just ill enough, for the reader to believe anyone is capable of such atrocities. The jumping off point for Raskolnikov is his idea of extraordinary and ordinary people. Looking at his theory and applying it as a tool for analysis of Raskolnikov himself leads not only to a deeper understanding of this idea but also of Raskolnikov....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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1488 words
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Crime and Punishment: Intent Makes the Difference - There are many different types of crime and punishment in medical law ranging from criminal to civil. Below I will explain the difference of criminal and civil and give descriptions of the different types of crime and punishment in the two categories. What is a criminal crime or act. The definition of criminal is anyone who has committed a criminal offense (a crime against the state) or who has been proven guilty of such an offense. Criminal crimes have two types of charges, misdemeanors and felonies....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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1719 words
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Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment begins with Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov living in poverty and isolation in St. Petersburg. The reader soon learns that he was, until somewhat recently, a successful student at the local university. His character at that point was not uncommon. However, the environment of the grim and individualistic city eventually encourages Raskolnikov’s undeveloped detachment and sense of superiority to its current state of desperation. This state is worsening when Raskolnikov visits an old pawnbroker to sell a watch....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essay]
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2299 words
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Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment - 1. As Rodya analyzes Luzhin’s character, he realizes that intellect unrestrained by moral purpose is dangerous due to the fact that many shrewd people can look right through that false façade. Luzhin’s false façade of intellect does not fool Rodya or Razumikhin, and although they try to convince Dunya into not marrying Luzhin, she does not listen. Rodya believes that Luzhin’s “moral purpose” is to “marry an honest girl…who has experienced hardship” (36). The only way he is able to get Dunya to agree to marry him, is by acting as if he is a very intellectual person, who is actually not as educated as he says he is....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1920 words
(5.5 pages)
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Crime and Punishment and Raskolnikov's article, On Crime - Crime and Punishment and Raskolnikov's article, "On Crime" Raskolnikov's article, "On Crime," is vital to the understanding of his beliefs. This article also has a profound effect on Crime and Punishment as a whole, the subject matter being one of the main themes of the novel. The idea of the "extraordinary man" is referred to literally throughout the book, but also notable is the subconscious effect the idea has on Raskolnikov. Sometimes Raskolnikov is not even aware of this influence. It is important to note originality, or the ability to "utter a new word," as a defining characteristic of the extraordinary man....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 3487 words
(10 pages)
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The History Behind Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Crime and Punishment was written by a Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky in 1866. This novel was originally published not as a book, but as articles in a literary journal called The Russian Messenger over the period of one year. Crime and Punishment was later published as a single volume and considered a novel by Dostoyevsky, though he had originally intended it to be a novella. Fyodor Dostoyevsky wrote on subjects close to home, using settings and characters familiar to his own experiences. Thus, it is important for the reader to analyze the history behind the work of Crime and Punishment to understand it completely....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essay]
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1289 words
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The Extraordinary Men in Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Dostoevsky’s theme of ordinary and extraordinary people is the basis of his work of literature, Crime and Punishment, which derives from his own life experiences. Crime and Punishment, is the story of a Russian man named Rodion Raskolnikov. Raskolnikov is an impoverished St. Petersburg habitant student who, “determined to overreach his humanity and assert his untrammeled individual will commit two acts of murder and theft” (Dostoevsky). To try to amend his actions, he uses the money he steals from the murdered to perform good deeds....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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2161 words
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Rationalizing Radicalism in "Crime and Punishment" vs. "Demons" by Dostoevsky - Crime and Punishment and Demons by Dostoevsky are two novels that are directly reflective of the time that he spent in exile. Crime and Punishment was a precursor to Demons and laid the foundation for the psychological novel that would characterize these and a later novel by Dostoevsky. Dostoevsky was made aware of the problems with Nihilistic ideas while he was exiled in Siberia. Crime and Punishment was Dostoevsky’s first attempt at a psychological analysis of a person’s inner struggles to rationalize this radicalism....   [tags: Crime and Punishment, Demons, Dostoevsky, ] 1375 words
(3.9 pages)
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Prison Reform in Russia and Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky - The novel Crime and Punishment occurs in the summer of 1865; a time when radical legal and social changes swept through Russia. The reforms of 1860’s and 1870’s were known as the Great Reforms because they affected every aspect of Russian life. With “an 1861 decree emancipating the serfs and [a] monumental reform of the court system in 1864,” the Russian society was still transitioning from an Estate-of-the-realm style toward a more just system focused on equality (Burnham 1227). The reformed penal system is not just under the modern sense of justice, yet it provided a far greater level of equality than the previous model, dominated by aristocrats and government officials....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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1100 words
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Religious Influences in the Path for Redemption in Crime and Punishment - With the prominent focus in Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky being the path for redemption and the search for hope, a connection can be made with the religious influences throughout the novel. Such religious influences throughout the Christian faith can most prominently be seen in how the characters such as Raskolnikov develop. Needing a vessel to communicate and push these religious influences onto a struggling and tormented Raskolnikov, Dostoevsky uses Sonia’s character to contrast religious perspectives and offer a beacon of hope to Raskolnikov....   [tags: Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoevsky]
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1279 words
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Suffering to Achieve Happiness in Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment - In such poor living conditions, those that the slums of Russia has to offer, the characters in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment1 struggle, living day to day. Raskolnikov, the protagonist, experiences multiple layers of suffering (the thought of his murder causes him greater suffering than does his poverty) as does Sonia and Katerina Ivanovna (1). Through these characters as well as Porfiry Petrovitch, Dostoevsky wants the reader to understand that suffering is the cost of happiness and he uses it to ultimately obliterate Raskolnikov’s theory of an ubermensch which allows him to experience infinite love....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 795 words
(2.3 pages)
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Salvation Through Human Suffering in Crime and Punishment - Salvation Through Human Suffering in Crime and Punishment “All men must suffer, and salvation can not be obtained unless this suffering is present” (Boland, p.4). All of the characters in the novel experience some sort of internal or external suffering. The main character, Raskolnikov, must grow and realize this in order to overcome his conflicts and reach the salvation of peace within. Dostoevsky’s concentration and focus is on why suffering must exist and how this suffering can be conquered. This is found to be true because in the six sections of the novel, only one is focused on the crime, and the remaining five are concentrated on Raskolnikov’s journey to overcome his suffering....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1194 words
(3.4 pages)
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The Protagonist and Antagonist of Crime and Punishment - The Protagonist and Antagonist of Crime and Punishment         Crime and Punishment is considered by many to be the first of Fyodor Dostoevsky's great books.  Crime and Punishment is a psychological account of a crime.  The crime is double murder.  A book about such a broad subject can be made powerful and appealing to our intellectual interests if there is a link between the reader, the action, and the characters. Doestoevsky makes all these links at the right places.  The action takes place between the protagonists and the antagonists.  The protagonists include Dounia, the Marmeladovs, Sonia, Razumhin, Porfiry Petrovich, and Nastaya.  The antagonists of the story are...   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 1768 words
(5.1 pages)
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The Search for Dostoyevsky in Crime and Punishment - The Search for Dostoyevsky in Crime and Punishment         Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky who is known as a great novelist wrote timeless classics such as The Idiot, Crime and Punishment, and The Brothers Karamazov, was not only a novelist, but a good psychologist who uncovered the secret sides of the human beings in a very effective way. His novels also affected Freud, Nietzsche, and Joyce. However there is one point that is a mystery. Did Dostoyevsky really reflect his own feelings, especially his fears, into the characters of his novels....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Research Papers]
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2733 words
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The Theme of Duality in Crime and Punishment - The Theme of Duality in Crime and Punishment In Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, the theme of duality is present throughout much of the novel. There are dual conflicts: one external between a disillusioned individual and his world, and the other internal between an isolated soul and his conscience (Walsh). It is the internal conflict in the main character, Raskolnikov, that is the focuses of much of the novel. The dual personalities of Raskolnikov are constantly at battle with one another, causing the inner conflict he experiences and thus creating his own personal punishment....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 1308 words
(3.7 pages)
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Downfall and Salvation in Crime and Punishment - In the novel Crime and Punishment, the so-called "extraordinary man" theory plays an important role. Raskolnikov, downtrodden, and psychologically battered, believes himself to be exempt from the laws of ordinary men. It is this creedo that makes him believe he has the right to murder Alyona Ivanovna. In the nineteenth century, the extraordinary man theory was widely popular. There were two main schools of thought on the subject, the proponents of which were the philosophers Georg Hegel and Freiderich Neitzsche....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 652 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Renewal of Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment - The Renewal of Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov, in Dostoevsky's novel Crime and Punishment, is a complex character difficult to understand. He believes himself superior to the rest of humanity, and therefore he believes he has the right to commit murder. After he kills Alena Ivanovna, an old pawnbroker, Raskolnikov discovers his supposed superiority has cut him off from other people. He exists in a self-created alienation from the world around him. Raskolnikov mearly drifts through life, unable to participate in it anymore....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays]
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2444 words
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A Nihilistic Analysis of Crime and Punishment - A Nihilistic Analysis of Crime and Punishment This paper provides an exhaustive analysis, from a Nihilistic perspective, of the novel, Crime and Punishment. The paper is divided into many sections, each with a self-explanatory title in capital letters, such as the section that immediately follows this sentence. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF MARMELADOV'S RECOLLECTION SCENE Katerina Ivanovna must deal with a man who drinks his life away while his family starves. Marmeladov recounts their suffering by first describing his loss of a job....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment]
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4904 words
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Nature and Nurture in Crime and Punishment - Nature and Nurture in Crime and Punishment     In the news today there is an article about a high-school boy who brought guns to school and shot several students. The parents of the victims are suing various computer game companies saying that the violent games present shooting and killing people as pleasurable and fail to portray realistic consequences. A representative of one of the companies released a statement saying that this is another example of individuals seeking to elude responsibility that has become so common in our society....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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1377 words
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Crime and Punishment as a Polyphonic Novel - The term 'polyphony' was introduced into literary theory by Mikhail Bakhtin in his Ïðîáëåìû ïîýòèêè Äîñòîåâñêîãî. The polyphonic novel is dialogic rather than monologic; this means that multiple voices can be heard, and each voice represents an alternative version of 'the truth'. (NB. The use of dialogue as a formal device does not make a novel polyphonic in the Bakhtinian sense; genuine polyphony entails a sense of ambivalence, a situation where the different voices compete with one another and represent alternative viewpoints between which the reader cannot make a straightforward choice.) In Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov is the main focalizer: his point of view is adopted by the thi...   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 450 words
(1.3 pages)
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Crime and Punishment in Great Expectations - Crime and Punishment in Great Expectations       Throughout Great Expectations, Charles Dickens's attitudes toward crime and punishment differ greatly from his real-life views. Dickens, according to Phillip Collins in Dickens and Crime, "had strong and conflicting feelings about criminals" (1), which explains why he was known to refer to criminals as both "irreclaimable wretches" and "creatures of neglect" (33). The author's contradictions toward crime stem from the fact that Dickens was constantly torn between his childhood memories of prison and poverty and the legal training he gained as an adult....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays]
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2220 words
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Moral Conflicts in Crime and Punishment - Moral Conflicts in Fydor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment   Crime and Punishment by Fydor Dostoyevsky has been hailed as the greatest literary work in the Western hemisphere. Crime and Punishment was written in pre-Communist Russia under the Tsar. Dostoyevsky's writing shows insight into the human mind that is at once frightening and frighteningly real. His main character, around who all other characters are introduced, is Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov. Raskolnikov murders an old pawnbroker woman for seemingly no reason at all....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 1262 words
(3.6 pages)
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Seeking Atonement in Crime and Punishment - Seeking Atonement in Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov, the protagonist of Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment was a complicated man who committed a crime. Raskolnikov murdered a woman who was a plague to mankind, especially the poor of Russia. In the chilling process however, he also murdered her younger sister, Lisaveta. To be purified, he drives himself through much agony. Not until the closing of the novel did he realize he must confess to be atoned and to find love. Consciously, Raskolnikov was averse to admitting his misdeed....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 646 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Struggle in Crime and Punishment - The Struggle in Crime and Punishment Reading this book makes you ill because from the beginning to the end you watch as psychological forces eat away at the thoughts and actions of their victim causing him to finally confess to the hideous crime he has committed. The story is basically the struggle between Raskolnikov's Napoleon-übermensch theory and his conscience which make him confess to his crime. Dostoevsky's genius is in describing how Raskolnikov struggles in his thoughts and actions. His thoughts become increasingly disjointed and desperate and his actions show that he has an increasing need to escape the uncertainty of being convicted, to talk about the crime, to confess, and to...   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 1530 words
(4.4 pages)
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Psychoanalysis in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - Analyzing the mind of a sociopath has been one of the most important tasks that psychoanalysts face today. The more they know and understand the complexities of the disturbed, the more they hope to find treatments and eventually a cure for the illness that they believe can cause the ultimate violent criminal. Perhaps Dostoevsky himself wanted to weigh in on the mind of the sociopath and the journey toward their violent lives. Due to his vivid description of Raskolnikov, Dostoevsky shows his readers first hand what a sociopath is like....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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2649 words
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Raskolnikov’s Theory in Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment - Crime and Punishment novel is one of the greatest creations of Fyodor Dostoyevsky that had a huge influence on the future world literature. It is social, psychological, philosophical and ideological novel. The work was written by Dostoyevsky in a hard time for Russia when there were conflicts between political views, when new ideas were still weak and old ideas started to collapse. According to Boris Lichman, PD, a Russian historian, Russian society movement towards a capitalist system in the second half of XIX century led to the destruction of villages, peoples’ impoverishment, aggravation of social conflicts, and, consequently, to the increase of crimes (Lichman)....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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2780 words
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Raskolnikov’s Character Development in Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky - Ethics is defined as moral principles that govern a person or group’s behavior. Ethics have always played a crucial role in determining different kinds of cultures and what kind of reputation a certain group of individuals holds. In North American culture, we determine our ethics as being brought up by certain standards that determine what kind of person we ought to be. By contrast, other cultures have different approaches as to what is ethically “correct” or acceptable. Ethics incremented in Russian culture for example, contrast dramatically with classic American ideals....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays]
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1083 words
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Egoism in Crime and Punishment - Egoism in Crime and Punishment An egocentric attitude can be seen in Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment. Dostoyevsky's young Raskolnikov is staggeringly arrogant. Raskolnikov commits a murder and a failed robbery in the story. His journey in overcoming his ego can be seen through his initial crime, denial of failure, and acceptance of mistakes. Raskolnikov commits his initial crime out of arrogance. "The old hag is nothing.... I killed not a human being," he says. (245) Raskolnikov feels that he has justification for killing the pawn broker....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 423 words
(1.2 pages)
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Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment - Crime And Punishment Section 1: Significance of Title The title Crime and Punishment is significant in the fact that Raskolnikov the main character commits and crime and faces punishment. This punishment is not just going to prison but psychological punishment too. His action haunts him the whole story. He does eventually go to jail though. This book shows that if someone commit’s a crime they will face punishment of some kind. Section 2: Author The author Fyodor Dostoevsky wrote his book Crime and Punishment from life experiences....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1318 words
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Crime and Punishment: Raskolnikov's Room -      Dostoevsky's 1865 novel Crime and Punishment is the story of an expelled university student's murder of an old pawnbroker and her sister. The idealistic ex-student, Raskolnikov, is ultimately unable to live up to his own nihilistic theory of what makes a "Great Man" and, overcome by fits of morality, betrays himself to the police. Exiled to Siberia, suffering redeems the unfortunate young dreamer. Crime and Punishment is similar in many ways to Balzac's Pere Goriot, especially in respect to questions of morality....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays]
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2951 words
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Guilt in Crime and Punishment - Guilt in Crime and Punishment   In Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoyevsky tells a story of a young man that has been forced out of his studies at a university, by poverty. In these circumstances, he develops his theory of an extraordinary man (Frank 62). This conjecture is composed of the ideas that all great men must climb over obstacles in their way to reach their highest potential and benefit human kind. In Raskolnikov's life, the great obstacle is his lack of money, and the way to get over this obstacle is to kill a pawnbroker that he knows....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 1264 words
(3.6 pages)
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Utilitarianism in Crime and Punishment - Utilitarianism in Crime and Punishment       Raskolnikov's mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma presented to him in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment exemplifies the empirical view of utilitarianism.  Utilitarianism attempts to distinguish between right and wrong by measuring a decision based on its calculated worth.  Raskolnikov appears to employ the fundamentals of utilitarianism by pitting the negative consequences of murdering his old landlady against the positive benefits that her money would bestow onto society.  However, a true follower of utilitarianism would be outraged at Raskolnikov's claim that murdering the old woman can be considered morally r...   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays]
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1878 words
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Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment - Life is a wheel rolling inexorably forward through the temporal realm of existence. There are those that succumb to its motion and there are a certain few, like Christ and Napoleon, who temporarily grasp the wheel and shape all life around them. "Normal" people accept their positions in life and are bound by law and morality. Extraordinary people, on the other hand, supersede the law and forge the direction and progress of society. Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky, is the story of a group of people caught beneath the wheel and their different reactions to their predicament....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1732 words
(4.9 pages)
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Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment - What is the ideal purpose of punishing criminals, how do we know when punishment has been adequately served, what would be an appropriate, morally justifiable punishment for Raskolnikov, and why. Elbert Hubbard said, "We are punished by our sins, not for them." Prince Machiavelli created the Machiavellian code where he stated the "Eye for an eye" principle. What is the purpose of punishment. Why does human kind feel it necessary to punish wrong-doers. Hubbard believed that punishment is not necessary in order to reform criminals, yet Machiavelli believed in bringing to justice all who broke the law....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 869 words
(2.5 pages)
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Comparison of Raskolnikov and Svidrigailov in Crime and Punishment - Comparison of Raskolnikov and Svidrigailov in Crime and Punishment In his book Crime and Punishment, Dostoevsky explores the paths of two men, Raskolnikov and Svidrigailov. These two men encompass many similar problems and obstacles throughout their lives. Both commit murders and are faced with the long and mentally excruciating journey of seeking redemption. They also share many characteristics of their personalities. The reason that the outcomes of their lives are so drastically different is due to the fact that they have completely different perspectives on life....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Dostoevsky Essays] 574 words
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Resurrection of Lazarus in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - Resurrection of Lazarus in Crime and Punishment In Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Raskalnikov undergoes a period of extreme psychological upheaval. By comparing this death and rebirth of Raskalnikov's psyche to the story of the resurrection of Lazarus, Dostoevsky emphasizes not only the gravity of his crimes, but also the importance of acceptance of guilt. From the moment when Raskalnikov murders the old woman, his personality begins to change drastically. Dostoevsky challenges the reader to understand the madness which ensues by first demonstrating that the ideas and convictions to which Raskalnikov clung died along with the women....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 452 words
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The Limitations of Reason Exposed in Crime and Punishment - The Limitations of Reason Exposed in Crime and Punishment   Dostoevsky's  Crime and Punishment illustrates an important idea. The idea is that "reason," that grand and uniquely human power, is limited in reach and scope.  Social critic Friedrich August von Hayek commented once that, ". it may be that the most difficult task for human reason is to comprehend its own limitations. It is essential for the growth of reason that as individuals we should bow to forces and obey principles we cannot hopefully to understand, yet on which the advance and even the preservation of civilization may depend." Such limitations imply that on life's most important questions - pa...   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 3051 words
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Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and Crime and Punishment - God Answers the Questions Presented by Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and Crime and Punishment             In Dostoevsky's novels pain and some heavy burden of the inevitability of human suffering and helplessness form Russia. And he depicts it not with white gloves on, nor through the blisters of the peasant, but through people who are close to him and his realities: city people who either have faith, or secular humanists who are so remote from reality that even when they love humanity they despise humans because of their own inability to achieve or to create paradise on earth....   [tags: The Brothers Karamazov Crime and Punishment]
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Sonia and Raskolnikov in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - Sonia and Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment Sonia and Raskolnikov are two characters that interact with each other in the novel, Crime and Punishment. They interact on multiple levels, sharing several likenesses. Both of these characters are at-times self-sacrificing, both are struggling for meaning in a dreary existence, and both are generally unhappy people, but brighten and seem to enjoy each other's presence--even when Raskolnikov is berating her religion. What is self-sacrifice, for which these characters and so many people around the world engage in....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 490 words
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The Murderer's Motives in Dostoevsky's Crime & Punishment - The Murderer's Motives in Dostoevsky's Crime & Punishment The beauty of Crime and Punishment is that there are no absolutes. It is a 19th century murder mystery, with the identity of the murderer clear, but the murderer's reasons far from being so. Although each chapter was replete with uncertainty, no other facet of the novel caused greater vexation both during the reading and even after its conclusion than what drove Raskol'nikov to commit the murder. That is not to say that he committed murder without purpose or reason, that he was just a cookie cutter villain with no purpose; instead, he is a multi-faceted character that is both likable and a scoundrel at once....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays]
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The Character of Dounia in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - The Character of Dounia Crime and Punishment    Dounia's commitment to her brother is unfaltering. Even when she is presented with the ultimatum of Luzhin, she continues to endure in her dedication and loyalty to her irritable and rascally brother. She realizes that making sure Raskolnikov is there will probably secure her fate in that she will not marry Luzhin. She refuses to do so though if he does not accept his brother. Dounia's commitment and loyalty can be seen in her calm nature about the letter, her loyal response to it, and her actions when she goes to visit her brother--she regards his gestures and words with guarded skepticism, but realizes that he is at least "...   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 476 words
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Raskolnikov's Dream in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - Raskolnikov's Dream in Crime and Punishment In Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov's dream about the mare can be used as a vehicle to probe deeply into his mentality to discover how he really feels inside. The dream suggests that Raskolnikov is a "split" man; after all, his name in Russian means "split". His personality has a cruel and thoughtless side as well as a caring, compassionate side. Through the dream and the symbols therein, a reader can cast Raskolnikov, as well as other characters from Crime And Punishment, into any of the various parts in the dream....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 606 words
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Crime and Punishment - My name is Raskolnikov - Crime and Punishment - My name is Raskolnikov         It is obvious that Raskolnikov did not kill Alyona. Nikolai did. He confessed, didn't he. Sure, sure, I know what you're saying: Raskolnikov confessed too. But it is obvious that his confession was not a true confession. Raskolnikov had seen Nikolai's true confession, and was so moved that he decided he'd like to try confessing too. And one must not overlook the Christ symbolism in the novel. Raskolnikov is the obvious Christ-figure; he's poor, he's generous, he's schizophrenic....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 878 words
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Imperfect Conscience in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - Crime and Punishment:  Imperfect Conscience               A highly educated individual, avoiding the hardships of society while pondering the possibility of great wealth, Raskolnikov, in Fyodor Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment," frustrated with his immoral actions, suffers from an abrupt physical and mental breakdown after brutally mutilating a wicked pawnbroker. After this soul-scarring incident, the initial feelings of success in completing his mission quickly changes once he realizes possible flaws in his, otherwise considered, perfect murder....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 564 words
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Murder Rationale in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - Murder Rationale in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment Feodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment is a murder mystery unlike most murder mysteries. In this novel the reader knows "who done it"; the mystery lies in why the murder is committed. Throughout the story, Raskolnikov gives three main reasons why he kills Alena Ivanovna. Although these reasons seem unrelated on a superficial level, there is truth in all of them. What's more, each one builds on its predecessor. Raskolnikov's first two reasons are scrutinized by Sonya one at a time as his solitary motive for murder....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays]
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Conflict in Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky - Within the tortured mind of a young Russian university student, an epic battle rages between two opposite ideologies - the conservative Christianity characteristic of the time, and a new modernist humanism gaining prevalence in academia. Fyodor Dostoevsky in the novel Crime and Punishment uses this conflict to illustrate why the coldly rational thought that is the ideal of humanism represses our essential emotions and robs us of all that is human. He uses the changes in Raskolnikov's mental state to provide a human example of modernism's effect on man, placing emphasis upon the student's quest for forgiveness and the effect of repressed emotion....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 652 words
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Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel “Crime and Punishment” brings the reader a glimpse into the mind of a criminal, tormented by the guilt of murder. Dostoevsky’s focal point of the novel does not lie within the crime nor the punishment but everything in between. Dostoevsky also vividly depicts the life and conditions of poverty within the confines of St. Petersburg. Dostoevsky uses a unique and descriptive diction which takes the reader’s perspective and puts them in the mind of the murderer – Raskolnikov....   [tags: Fyodor Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 1006 words
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The Rejection of Svidrigailov in Crime and Punishment - The Rejection of Svidrigailov in Crime and Punishment Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov would reject Svidrigailov because he knows that this man has designs against his sister. Dounia has been his main concern for the past couple chapters-he hounds Svidrigailov not because he enjoys his company, but he worries endlessly about his intentions. Svidrigailov and Raskolnikov at the bar engage in a conversation about Dounia and the interactions of her and he at the house of Marfa Petrovna....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 469 words
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Murder in Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime And Punishment - The greatest difficulty in my life that I have ever faced was the relationship I once shared with a boy I cared for. As a young infatuated girl, I thought we were going to be always together. Since I believed I would always be with him, I accepted whatever happened to me. During the relationship, things had completely changed after we were together for four months; he began to be abusive more and more often. His suspicions and paranoia intensified when I entered high school and I tried to make friends....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1061 words
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The Prostitute In Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Notes from Underground, and The Meek One - The Prostitute In Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Notes from Underground, and The Meek One The prostitute is a curious fixture of Victorian era literature. In the works of William Thackeray and Samuel Richardson it was almost cliché for the heroine to end up in a house of prostitution and then to transcend that situation in a show of proper Victorian morals. Having seen many young women forced by extreme poverty to take up the trade of a loose woman, Fyodor Dostoevsky, a petit-bourgeois fallen on hard times himself, took a rather different approach to the whole issue; he recognized that these women were not utterly without merit as so many people of the time thought....   [tags: Crime Punishment]
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Moral Relativism in Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - Moral Relativism in Crime and Punishment At the close of Crime and Punishment, Raskolinkov is convicted of Murder and sentenced to seven years in Siberian prison. Yet even before the character was conceived, Fyodor Dostoevsky had already convicted Raskolinkov in his mind (Frank, Dostoevsky 101). Crime and Punishment is the final chapter in Dostoevsky's journey toward understanding the  forces that drive man to sin, suffering, and grace. Using ideas developed in Notes from Underground and episodes of his life recorded in Memoirs of the House of the Dead, Dostoevsky puts forth in Crime in Punishment a stern defense of natural law and an irrefutable volume of evidence condemning Raskolnikov'...   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 2792 words
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The Two Personalities of Raskolnikov in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - The Two Personalities of Raskolnikov in Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov, the main character of the novel Crime and Punishment by Feodor Dostoevsky, actually possesses two completely contradicting personalities. One part of him is intellectual: cold, unfeeling, inhumane, and exhibiting tremendous self-will. It is this side of him that enables him to commit the most terrible crime imaginable - taking another human life. The other part of his personality is warm and compassionate. This side of him does charitable acts and fights against the evil in his society....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 572 words
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Free Essays on Crime and Punishment - Suffering, Death, and Resurrection - Crime and Punishment -  Suffering, Death, and Resurrection Fyodor Dostoevsky wrote the novel, Crime and Punishment, during a turbulent time in Russian history. Yet his work will speaks to any age. Dostoevsky  wrote to warn against what he considered the negative effects of the trend of nihilism and rational egoism. He advances this objective by employing themes of suffering, resurrection, and death--all of these currents running through a surprisingly benevolent universe.             If Dostoevsky's fellow Russian Marx was correct in stating that religion is the opiate of the people, then suffering is the proverbial needle that injects it into a person....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 562 words
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Guilt, Suffering, Confession and Redemption in Crime and Punishment - Guilt, Suffering, Confession and Redemption in Crime and Punishment             "You keep lying!" screamed Raskolnikov, no longer able to restrain himself. "You're lying, you damned clown!" And he flung himself on Porfiry, who retired to the doorway, but without a trace of panic. "I understand everything, everything!" He approached Porfiry. "You're lying and taunting me so Ill give myself away-" "You can't give yourself away any more than you have already, Rodion Romanovich, old man. Why, you've gone into a state....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays]
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19th Century Theories in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - 19th Century Theories in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment "I teach you the Superman. Man is something that has to be surpassed. What have you done to surpass him?" These words said by Friedrich Nietzsche encompass the theories present in Dostoevsky's nineteenth century novel, Crime and Punishment. Fyodor Dostoevsky, living a life of suffering himself, created the character of Raskolnikov with the preconceptions of his own sorrowful and struggling life. Throughout his exile in Siberia from 1849-1859, his sentiments of suffering, sorrow, and the common man surfaced and heightened, inspiring him to begin writing Crime and Punishment in 1859....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 2467 words
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The Subconscious Mind in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment - The Subconscious Mind in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment In Fyodor Dostoevsky’s psychological novel, Crime and Punishment, the suffering and isolation of the late nineteenth century Russia becomes reality. As a young man who has left his studies in the university, Raskolnikov finds himself wallowing in poverty and self-pity. With his dreams of becoming a prominent “Napoleon” of Russia destroyed, he feels that he is one of the many worthless citizens that he has learned to detest. Feeling that he must support his mother and sister by proving himself to be a hero to society, Raskolnikov initiates the solution to his situation....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays]
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Literary Techniques Used by Fyodor Dostoyevsky in Crime and Punishment - A Study of the literary techniques used by Fyodor Dostoyevsky in Crime and Punishment to convey the downfall and subsequent rise of the main character. "Crime and Punishment" by Fyodor Dostoyevsky is the story of a young student Raskolnikov and his need to murder an old woman to prove one of his many philosophies. The book begins with the murder, but the primary focus is on his reasoning and reactions before and after the act. It is set in St Petersburg where the main character, Raskolnikov, appears to be an ex-student living, in poverty, a life of lethargy....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 2235 words
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The Character of Luzhin in Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Assignment: “It is said that of all the characters in the novel, Dostoyevsky dislikes only one, Luzhin. Write an essay where you analyze those elements, which make this dislike evident. Include Luzhin’s ideas and their effects on Raskolnikov, along with reasons for including the list of crimes by intellectuals.” In Crime and Punishment, Dostoyevsky clearly shows that Luzhin is a disliked character. This is illustrated through Luzhin’s ideas and their effect on Raskolnikov as well as through Luzhin’s actions....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 455 words
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Crime and Punishment - Raskolnikov's Extraordinary Man Theory - Crime and Punishment -  Raskolnikov's Extraordinary Man Theory          In the novel, Crime and Punishment, the principle character, Raskolnikov, has unknowingly published a collection of his thoughts on crime and punishment via an article entitled "On Crime." Porfiry, who is trying to link Raskolnikov to a murder, has uncovered this article, read it, and tells Raskolnikov that he is very interested in learning about his ideas. Porfiry brings Raskolnikov into this conversation primarily to find out more about Raskolnikov's possible involvement in the crime....   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 772 words
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Importance of St. Petersburg in Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment - Importance of St. Petersburg in Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment explores the dangerous effects of St. Petersburg, a malignant city, on the psyche of the impoverished student Raskolnikov. In this novel, Petersburg is more than just a backdrop. The city plays a central role in the development of the characters and the actions that they take. Raskolnikov survives in one of the cramped, dark spaces that are characteristic of Petersburg. These spaces are like coffins; they suffocate Raskolnikov's mind....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays]
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The Role of Marmelodov in Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - A Taste of Marmeladov In Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel, Crime and Punishment, Marmeladov is a minor character whose story is told in only a few short chapters of the first two books, and yet, Marmeladov plays an important role in the novel. Both Marmeladov and Raskolnikov are desperate men trying to function in a bleak world. Both men feel alienated in a world which has no meaning. Despite his miserable existence, Marmeladov hopes to find salvation through his anguish. Marmeladov reflects the themes of guilt and suffering that Raskolnikov later shares....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 973 words
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The Theories of Porfiry in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - The Theories of Porfiry in Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov commits a murder. He has a theory. Porfiry is an investigator. He too has a theory. Porfiry's is getting closer and closer to winning. Porfiry Petrovich believes many things about criminal nature--and therefore he believes these things will happen to Raskolnikov, the man that he has pinned as the perpetrator or the murder. He uses the comparison of a butterfly moving closer to a candle, the fact that if he lets the criminal wallow in mixed freedom and terror he will be able to complete a mathematical proof of the crime, and that the criminal's best move is to tell the truth, during which endeavor he will ultimately lie...   [tags: Dostoevsky Crime and Punishment] 447 words
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The Mind of a Criminal in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s "Crime and Punishment" and Mary Shelley’s "Frankenstein" - The human mind is a complex labyrinth barely explored. What drives humans to make decisions, behave in certain manors, and react in certain ways are defined by many theories of psychology. What actually goes on in the mind of a criminal or a sociopath. Can crimes be justified. And where do society’s morals take effect. These questions are ones that might be posed when reading Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. A great mind can easily be corrupted by a narcissistic need for knowledge or the simple drive to prove a point....   [tags: Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment, Mary Shel] 774 words
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Communism Exposed in One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and Crime and Punishment - Many of Man's struggles are usually the result of societal standards, control, and punishment. These struggles are present in both One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Crime & Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. Through setting and internal monologue, both authors depict the effects of the brutalities of communism on Man's spirituality. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich demonstrates the brutalities of communism as symbolized by the brotherhood of men inside a forced labor prison camp in Siberia....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1555 words
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The History and Evolution of Punishment for Crime - The incarceration rate in the United States has continued to climb over the past twenty years making it one of the highest in the world. Police officers have been going to work trying to put away people who are breaking the law, but why do criminals continue to do so when they know they have a good chance of getting caught. Crime has been around since societies have evolved and every society has had their own way of dealing with criminal behavior. From early tribal times where the thinking was an eye for an eye, to medieval times when people who stole a loaf of bread would be put to death by being hung, and today with a court system that decides the fate of a criminal....   [tags: criminology, criminal justice]
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Economics of Crime: Capital Punishment - Introduction Capital punishment was an ancient penalty. This has incurred many argues since 18th century. The focal points are ‘value of life’ and ethical concerns. Besides, the economics analysis also is important, which focuses on the effects and efficiency of capital punishment. In the article, the anterior part indicates the supporting reasons of death penalty, the posterior part indicates the cons. Support Reason Deterrence of punishment Becker (1968), first of all, assumes that the crime is bad which incurs social loss, it should be deterred, death penalty is the severest punishment, and potential criminals are normal individuals....   [tags: Capital Punishment, Death Penalty]
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The Extraordinary Man in Dostoevsky's "Crime and Punishment" - The extraordinary man in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment is presented in three fashions: the first is Dostoevsky's theory of the extraordinary man, the second is the main character's, Raskolnikov's notion of himself as an extraordinary man and the third is Dostoevsky's view of the protagonist's attachment to his self-identification with the extraordinary. Dostoevsky's ideas about the extraordinary man are given in Raskolnikov's speech to Porfiry Petrovich on pages 242 and 243. Dostoevsky's view is expressed as Raskolnikov's, and is concerned with defining what exactly an extraordinary man is....   [tags: extraordinary man, Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishmen] 1925 words
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The History of Capital Punishment as a Deterrent to Crime - In today’s day and age, many people have had high minded and ordained question concerning capital punishment, or the death penalty. Through the passing of time, our society castigates transgressors with the death penalty. Many nations through time have decided to enact this harsh treatment. In the United States alone, the federal government has persevered to reinforce people to death (Marzillo 10). According to Wikipedia Encyclopedia, “Capital Punishment is the execution of a person by judicial process as a punishment for an offense.” Over the centuries capital punishment has been one of the most controversial debates in our society....   [tags: Capital Punishment, Death Penalty]
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Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide - The Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (1948) 1. The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (1969), the Convention applies to treaties between states. 2. The Preamble enshrines the recognition of genocide as a crime that must be eradicated from the world within the conceptual framework of the Convention. The atrocities of history are declared as evidence of the substantial impact that genocide has had on humanity and to prevent these atrocities international co-operation is required....   [tags: Africa ]
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