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Similarities in "Araby" by James Joyce and "Young Goodman Brown" by Nathaniel Hawthorne - ... The commitment the narrator makes to the girl sets his expectations for the bazaar so high that anything but perfection comes to him as disappointment. The narrator displayed idealism when he anxiously waited for his uncle’s arrival with high aspirations to blow away Mangan’s sister with his promised gift from the bazaar. As 9pm approached the narrators seemingly intoxicated, nonchalant uncle finally returns. This makes the venture for the boy seemingly less exciting due to the late hour but his feelings for Mangan’s sister overcome that and he goes anyway....   [tags: Idealism, Temptation, Protagonists] 674 words
(1.9 pages)
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Comparison of A & P by John Updike and Araby by James Joyce - John Updike's “A & P” and James Joyce's “Araby” are very similar. The theme of the two stories is about a young man who is interested in figuring out the difference between reality and the fantasies of romance that play in his head and of the mistaken thoughts each has about their world, the girls, and themselves. One of the main similarities between the two stories is the fact that the main character has built up unrealistic expectations of women. Both characters have focused upon one girl in which they place all their affection....   [tags: Compare Contrast compare/contrast] 675 words
(1.9 pages)
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Coming of Age in Hemingway's Indian Camp and Joyce's Araby - Coming of Age in Hemingway's Indian Camp and Joyce's Araby In reading Hemingway's "Indian Camp" and Joyce's "Araby", about 2 young boy's not so ceremonial passage to life's coming of age. The protagonist Nick in "Indian Camp" witnessed in one night the joy of going on a journey to an unknown destination with his father and uncle Charlie. Later, Nick receives an expedited course in life and death. Joyce's "Araby" protagonist whis friends with Mangan but has a secret desirable infatuation with his sister....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 618 words
(1.8 pages)
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Comparing Mortality in Hemingway's Indian Camp and Joyce's Araby - The Subject of Mortality in Hemingway's Indian Camp and Joyce's Araby Nick came face to face with his own mortality in Hemingway's "Indian Camp" and, like most of us, denied its inevitability, evidenced by the last line of the story: "In the early morning lake sitting in the stern of the boat with his father rowing, he felt sure that he would never die." (31) His first experience with the beginning of life was far from the joyous occasion most of us are taught to associate with birth. Coupled with his first experience with a violent suicide in the same setting, his feeling that he would never die is understandable....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 400 words
(1.1 pages)
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Symbolism in A Good Man is Hard to Find and Araby - Symbolism In the short story, “A Good Man is Hard to Find”, by Flannery O'Connor, every object including the characters are symbols. The Grandmother for example is the one and only dynamic character, represents all of us who have had to feel grief or needed to ask for forgiveness. As Flannery O'Connor has suggested, the story is a spiritual journey because of the Grandmother's quandaries. In the beginning of the story the Grandmother is obsessed with everything worldly and superficial. She cares only about how others perceive her, “Her collars and cuffs were white organdy trimmed with lace and at her neckline she had pinned a purple spray of cloth violets containing a sachet....   [tags: Flannery O'Connor James Joyce]
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1375 words
(3.9 pages)
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Bubbles in James Joyce's Short Story Collection, Dubliners - Many of Joyce’s characters in Dubliners are trapped in a bubble, where they are paralyzed and confined to a world that they want to escape. The first example of this is in “Araby” where the narrator is attracted to a young girl. He can hear her, see her, and dream and wish about her. He always thinks about her, and longs to be with her: “Her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to romance (Joyce, 25).” However, he is unable to escape from himself and talk to her or get to know her....   [tags: Araby, literary analysis] 921 words
(2.6 pages)
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Dubliners: A Collection of Short Stories - ... Having gone through traumatic experiences, only to discover that everything that they thought was possible were nothing more than a mere dream. "An Encounter" proposes that one's desire for escape and adventure won't stop the daily routines because its unaviodable. New experiences that people expect could sometimes be disturbing. The story commences with kids playing Wild West for the sole purpose of disrupting school activities. An unnamed boy, playing as the narrator craves for exciting adventures and persuades his two friends to skip one day of school to venture the streets of Dublin....   [tags: araby, abnormal behavior] 629 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Knight and the Angel - In his short story “Araby,” James Joyce describes a young boy’s first stirring of love and his first encounter with the disappointment that love and life in general can cause. Throughout the story Joyce prepares the reader for the boy’s disillusionment at the story’s end. The fifth paragraph, for example, employs strong contrasts in language to foreshadow this disillusionment. In this passage the juxtaposition of romantic and realistic diction, detail, and imagery foreshadows the story’s theme that, in the final analysis, life ends in disappointment and disillusionment....   [tags: Araby, James Joyce] 882 words
(2.5 pages)
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Unable to Permanently Escape Reality in Paul´s Case by Willa Carter and Araby by James Joyce - ... Instead of depositing all the money, Paul only deposited the checks and kept the cash for himself. The cash that Paul stole amounted to a thousand dollars. Fed up with his common daily life, Paul jumps on the midnight train to New York City. In the city Paul finds the glamorized life he was hoping for. He was quick to spend the money on an expensive hotel room, fancy clothes, five-star meals and other unnecessary wants. Paul finally escaped the hostile world he lived in, but his money-bought romance did not last long....   [tags: protagonists, pleasure, romance] 955 words
(2.7 pages)
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A Journey into Self-Discovery in Araby by James Joyce and Katherine Mansfield’s, The Garden Party - In “Araby”, author James Joyce presents a male adolescent who becomes infatuated with an idealized version of a schoolgirl, and explores the consequences which result from the disillusionment of his dreams. While living with his uncle and aunt, the main character acts a joyous presence in an otherwise depressing neighborhood. In Katherine Mansfield’s, The Garden Party, Mansfield’s depicts a young woman, Laura Sherridan, as she struggles through confusion, enlightenment, and the complication of class distinctions on her path to adulthood....   [tags: infatuation, adulthood, realization]
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1267 words
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Comparing James Joyce's Araby and Ernest Hemingway's A Clean, Well-Lighted Place - Comparing James Joyce's Araby and Ernest Hemingway's A Clean, Well-Lighted Place As divergent as James Joyce's "Araby" and Ernest Hemingway's "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" are in style, they handle many of the same themes. Both stories explore hope, anguish, faith, and despair. While "Araby" depicts a youth being set up for his first great disappointment, and "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" shows two older men who have long ago settled for despair, both stories use a number of analogous symbols, and lap over each other thematically....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1373 words
(3.9 pages)
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Growing Up in Araby by James Joyce and Boys and Girls by Alice Munro - Growing Up in Araby by James Joyce and Boys and Girls by Alice Munro In the stories “Araby” by James Joyce, and “Boys and Girls” by Alice Munro, there is a common theme of growing up. In both of these stories the characters came to a realization of who they were and what they wanted to be. They both are of the age when reality strikes and priorities take on meaning. The characters in both stories evolve through rites of passage but the way in which these revolutions occur differ with each character....   [tags: Boys and Girls, Alice Munro] 972 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Motivation for Anguish - First romantic encounters by young boys are often wrought with many different emotions and illusions. In “Araby”, a portrayal of a young boy’s experience of romantic reality, the reader is witness to the narrator’s physical, emotional and chronological journey. The emotional reactions, anguish and anger, show the importance of the events in the young boy’s life. The deprecating word vanity is significant to the story’s theme, because while anguish and anger are emotional reactions, the admission of vanity is a severe moral judgment of oneself....   [tags: Araby, James Joyce, Literary Analysis]
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872 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Truth of a Young Boy’s Romance - Many men are naïve when it comes down to them being in love. Men begin their experimental stage with women when they are young. Most boys learn or get an understanding of male and female relations from observing their parents, guardians, movies, or even reading books. In the story “Araby” a young boy has a crush on his friend Mangan’s sister. His crush on the girl is typical with young boys of his age. The young boy is hesitant to approach her or even speak with her because of his shyness. The young boy's idea of romance quickly begins to fade after his delayed trip to Araby....   [tags: relationships, ] 553 words
(1.6 pages)
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World War I and World War II - World War I and World II are basically the same, right. Well, one can also say they have nothing in common. The comparison of the two wars is conceivable, but it is thought-provoking because they are such widespread notions. This concept applies to Araby, written by James Joyce during WWI, and The Flash, written by Italo Calvino during WWII. In Araby, the protagonist falls in love with a girl, but love deceives him. In his moment of epiphany, “[g]azing up into the darkness [he] saw [himself] as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and [his] eyes burned with anguish and anger” (Joyce 1)....   [tags: Comparative] 778 words
(2.2 pages)
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Arabay by James Joyce - Select Literary Elements of “Araby” In “Araby” by James Joyce, the author uses several literary elements to convey the multitude of deep meanings within the short story. Three of the most prominent and commonly used by Joyce are the elements of how the themes were developed, the unbounded use of symbolism, and the effectiveness of a particular point of view. Through these three elements Joyce was able to publish his world famous story and allow his literary piece to be understood and criticized by many generations....   [tags: literary elements, symbolism]
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1497 words
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The Sisters and An Encounter - Like the two previous stories, The Sisters and An Encounter, Araby is about a somewhat introverted boy fumbling toward adulthood with little in the way of guidance from family or community. The truants in An Encounter managed A young boy who is similar in age and temperament to those in “The Sisters” and “An Encounter” develops a crush on Mangan’s sister, a girl who lives across the street. One evening she asks him if he plans to go to a bazaar (a fair organized, probably by a church, to raise money for charity) called Araby....   [tags: English Literature] 1218 words
(3.5 pages)
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Common Themes In Short Stories - James Joyce, a most prestigious author of many titles, has incorporated into his works many different thoughts, life experiences, as well as themes. Those three things that he used in his works I believe are what made him the awesome author he is today. The main focus of this paper is to inform you of the themes that reoccur in many of his short stories. Some themes that I noticed were: family, frustration, dreams of escape, love infatuations, and finally, sin. Family is a strong theme in Joyce&#8217;s writings for in Araby, the young teen finds himself obeying his uncle and asking his permission to go to the festival showing his sense of respect and need for family....   [tags: essays research papers] 960 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Search for Truth or Meaning in James Joyce's Dubliners - The Search for Truth or Meaning in Dubliners     Several of James Joyce's stories in Dubliners can read as lamentations on a frustrating inability of man to represent meaning by external means, including written word. When characters in "Araby," "Counterparts," and "A Painful Case" attempt to represent or signify themselves, other characters, or abstract spiritual entities with or through words, they not only fail, but end up emotionally ruined. Moreover, the inconclusive endings of the three stories correspond with the fates of their characters....   [tags: Dubliners Essays]
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1799 words
(5.1 pages)
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Dubliners and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock - Dubliners and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Several of Joyce's stories in Dubliners can read as lamentations. They are showing the frustrated inability of man to represent meaning by external means, including written word. When characters in ^Araby^, and ^A Painful Case^ attempt to represent or signify themselves, other characters or abstract spiritual entities with or through words, they not only fail, but end up emotionally ruined. In T.S. Eliots^ poem, ^ The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,^ the feeling relates to one overall issue of emotional investment in representation....   [tags: essays papers] 844 words
(2.4 pages)
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Unexpected Realizations in The Dubliners by James Joyce - James Joyce incorporates many things into his short stories in The Dubliners, whether that is religion, alcohol, women’s issues, relationships or epiphany. Most of these things have a way of coming back to reflect different points in his life. Each story has a way of portraying one, if not more of these subjects. Sometimes relationships can lead to many emotions and sometimes unexpected things happen. You can say these unexpected things can cause someone to experience and epiphany, which can be defined as a sudden or striking realization....   [tags: epiphany, relationship, adventure]
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2178 words
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Modernism and Experience - When seeking to describe or analyze Modernist literature, and the Modernist era as a whole, it is essential to keep in mind that these writers were challenging many core beliefs regarding being, both in relation to one’s self, as well as in the external world. Out of the many things Modernist literature does, one of the arguable contentions is that Modernity seeks to collapse the idea that the external and internal are separate. In modern writing, writers such as Joyce and Woolf make a move to disrupt traditional literary forms to push the concepts of truth, belief, and knowledge through the synthesis of experience in the visceral/physical world....   [tags: Modernist Era, Literature] 1347 words
(3.8 pages)
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Dubliners by James Joyce - Although "Araby", "Eveline", and "The Dead" from Dubliners by James Joyce are three different stories, the author uses similar elements to convey each message, and so develops a strong connection between chapters. Internal conflict and epiphany are used to dramatize the characters in three stories. In "Araby", the narrator takes a fancy to his friends Mangan's sister. Since then, he thinks of her day and night, " Her images accompanied me even in places the most hostile to romance..." (25). One night, she asks him if he will go to Araby....   [tags: American Literature] 418 words
(1.2 pages)
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Human Nature/Cycles of Life and Escape and Adventure - Human Nature/Cycles of Life and Escape and Adventure Throughout the life everyone goes through cycles of events that inevitably lead them to new directions in life. It leaves one wanting to explore a life greater than what he or she has. Such cycles can include the creation of new friendships, longing for love or lust, boredom or simply wanting something more from life. In the book Dubliners by James Joyce, stories of escape and adventure are clearly evident in "Araby" and "Eveline" and "The Dead"....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1392 words
(4 pages)
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Male and Female Paralysis in James Joyce's Dubliners - Male and Female Paralysis in Dubliners Critics widely recognized that each story within James Joyce’s Dubliners contains a theme of paralysis. In fact, Joyce himself wrote, “My intention was to write a chapter of the moral history of my country and I chose Dublin for the scene because that city seemed to me the centre of paralysis” (Joyce, letter to Grant Richards, 5 May 1906). Contained in this moral history called Dubliners are twelve stories that deal with the paralysis of a central male character and only four that deal with so called paralysis within a central female character....   [tags: Dubliners Essays]
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3570 words
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Epiphanies in Joyce's Dubliners and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales - James Joyce’s Dubliners is a compilation of stories that all rely on character epiphanies in order to develop each story. These epiphanies change the tone of each story because each yields a negative change or reaction. In both “Araby” and “The Dead”, the characters realize or learn something about the world around them, which makes them second guess either themselves or the reason behind their actions. Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales contains at least one tale that relies on an epiphany to help develop theme but it doesn’t change the tone or course of the story, it just helps to portray the true meaning of the character....   [tags: James Joyce Geoffrey Chaucer] 1192 words
(3.4 pages)
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Elements of Post-Modernism in Literature - Post modernism is a very difficult concept to define. A French philosopher once defined post modernism as an "incredulity toward all meta narratives," which basically means a skeptical attitude toward all claims of absolute truth. Post modern writers use elements and techniques that provoke the reader to question their reading experience and scrutinize their own personal understanding of life and the values of their society. There are excellent examples of post modern writers using elements of post modern writing, such as irony, magic realism and fragmentation in the short stories read in Ms....   [tags: magic realism, irony, fragmentation, ] 2033 words
(5.8 pages)
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The Downgrading Demise of Love - The Downgrading Demise of Love “North Richmond Street, being blind, was a quiet street.” (198). Ignorance is a harmful state of mind, which gives a false sense of happiness to those consumed by it. Ignorance does not allow one to mature by experience of actual events. It shelters one’s perception of actual events by giving illusions of hope. It allows the imagination to instill more meaning into an incident, where there is none. In “Araby,” James Joyce illustrates how the boy overcomes his oblivious state through irony, epiphany, and symbolism....   [tags: English Literature] 627 words
(1.8 pages)
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Oppression in Literature - As days turn into months, months into years, years into decades, and so on and so forth, life itself and everyone in it is evolving in every way possible. From the way they dress, to the way they carry themselves, and to their beliefs and so much more. Even the way people study has completely evolved. A major reason behind change is technology. The world has become a new and improved digital world. Everyone expects this because in time they become smarter and new ideas are derived from it. People anticipate that one day this can eventually lead to cures for diseases and many other inventions that can only do well for them....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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2042 words
(5.8 pages)
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Failure of Love - There is a theme found time and time again, when almost any literary piece is studied or looked upon: love. Not only love, but the twists and turns in which love takes its course; in most cases, the course to nowhere. The feeling of “failing at love” is one that every person will experience within their lifetime. Modern Literature faces this bitter truth head-on, straying away from the once bountiful “love, passion, and romance” during the Romantic Era, and focusing more on the other side of the glass....   [tags: Literature] 1573 words
(4.5 pages)
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Epiphanies in Dubliners - Dubliners begins on a dismal note. The first story, “Two Sisters” opening sentence begins with: “There was no hope for him this time” (9) referring to the dead Father Flynn and through the course of reading the fifteen stories in Dubliners the reader discovers there is no hope for any of the characters in any of the stories. The lives of Joyce’s Dubliners and Ireland itself has been defined by the Roman Catholic influence on the people, English rule and the Irish’s own struggle for political and cultural independence and self- identity....   [tags: Character Analysis]
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1732 words
(4.9 pages)
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James Joyce's Dubliners - James Joyce's Dubliners The struggle that the Irish people must face with the problems of their society can be seen clearly in the book Dubliners, by James Joyce. This book portrays a unique image of what the Irish people are experiencing during the time. However, this book gives a deeper view of what really is occurring because it gives us the themes of the problems that are happening in a peculiar way. In fact, one can see throughout the stories the humanities theme of individual and society, and the literary theme of journey and escape....   [tags: Dubliners James Joyce Essays] 2308 words
(6.6 pages)
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Epiphany - World War I and World II are basically the same, right. If so, Araby, written around WWI by James Joyce, and The Flash, written around WWII by Italo Calvino, are also the same, no. Indeed, these short stories have many similarities. At the same time, both stories have many differences. Thus, it is difficult to compare both stories when considering all the details. If the subject of comparison is more specific, such as epiphany, then more emphasis and effort can be put into the comparison. In Araby, the protagonist falls in love with a girl, but love deceives him....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Joyce and Calvino] 820 words
(2.3 pages)
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Dublin as City of Paralysis VS Paris as City of Darkness in Modernist Literature - The beginning of the 20th century was an era where tremendous changes took place. Industrial revolution brought about techonological advancement while Darwin’s Evolutionary Theories completely overthrew traditional scientific beliefs. Undergoing such an immense transition at the turn of the century, the focus of the modernist writings was shifted from realism to experimental techniques such as fragmentation and defamiliarization. Modernist writers were no longer interested in depicting the city using the Victorian way....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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2034 words
(5.8 pages)
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The Futility of Conflict in three Pieces of Literature - In this paper, we take a look at the following pieces in an effort to see the conflict in short stories and poems: Astronomer’s wife by Kay Boyle, Araby by James Joyce and lastly The Battle by Louis Simpson. The short story Astronomer’s Wife by Kay Boyle, portrays a wife to a man who stays up late watching the stars and dreaming about being “up there”. It would seem that the astronomer spent longer in bed then his wife, and that his wife took care of him while he kept his head in the sky. The astronomer and his wife had started to grow apart due to his eccentric attitude; his wife felt that she was almost alone, with just her duties to take care of but no one to actually have conversation t...   [tags: conflict, James Joyce, Kay Boyle, Louis Simpson,]
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1398 words
(4 pages)
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Change: The Seed of Evolution - The moment when an answer to a question from three weeks ago is suddenly realized is known as an epiphany--a sudden understanding of the nature to an idea or quandary, usually attained through something simple and, sometimes, unassociated (“Epiphany”). Authors often use this device not only to convey a realization on the part of their character, but also to allude to an internal message (“Epiphany”). James Joyce employed this device in many of his works in hopes of revealing to his Irish peers the low esteem of their conduct (Bulson 33)....   [tags: Literary Review ]
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2499 words
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Horse Dealers Daughter - The short story, “The Horse Dealer’s Daughter,” by D. H. Lawrence is about Mabel Pervin and her three brothers who are left with debts to pay after their father’s death. Once the horses are sold Mabel’s brothers decide where their lives would lead them and advice her to seek the home of her sister. Realizing their rejection and acknowledging an uncertain future, she visits the graves of her mother and father. Feeling depressed and helpless, Mabel walks into a mucky pond not cognizant of Jack Fergusson’s presence....   [tags: essays research papers] 367 words
(1 pages)
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An Analysis of Religion as a Captor in Dubliners by James Joyce - An Analysis of Religion as a Captor in Dubliners by James Joyce A collection of short stories published in 1907, Dubliners, by James Joyce, revolves around the everyday lives of ordinary citizens in Dublin, Ireland (Freidrich 166). According to Joyce himself, his intention was to "write a chapter of the moral history of [his] country and [he] chose Dublin for the scene because the city seemed to [b]e the centre of paralysis" (Friedrich 166). True to his goal, each of the fifteen stories are tales of disappointment, darkness, captivity, frustration, and flaw....   [tags: Papers] 1175 words
(3.4 pages)
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Terrorism - A Peaceful Jihad is an Oxymoron - Terrorism - A Peaceful Jihad is an Oxymoron In June of 2002, when asked to give a graduation speech at Harvard, Zayed Yasin, a Muslim, wrote a speech in which he explained his definition of a Jihad. In accordance with the subject matter, Yasin titled his speech “My American Jihad.” When Harvard requested him to change the title, he complied. This action, though, stirred up many who believed Yasin had a right to use his original title. From the stance John Milton takes in his essay, Aeropagitica, one can clearly see that he would argue against Harvard’s decision to censor the title of Yasin’s speech....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 979 words
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Triangular Structure in James Joyce's Dubliners - Triangular Structure in James Joyce's Dubliners Within the body of literary criticism that surrounds James Joyce's Dubliners is a tendency to preclude analysis beyond an Irish level, beyond Joyce's own intent to "create the uncreated conscience of [his] race." However, in order to place the text within an appropriately expansive context, it seems necessary to examine the implications of the volume's predominant thematic elements within the broader scope of human nature. The "psychic drama" which places Dubliners within a three-tiered psychological framework ² desire, repression, agression ² lies at the root of a larger triangular structure that pervades many of our most fundamental belief...   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners Essays] 1963 words
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What Love Is Not - When I was Thirteen, I couldn’t wait until I was sixteen so that I could drive. Once I was sixteen I couldn’t wait until I was eighteen. I wanted to be considered an adult. When I reached the age of eighteen, I couldn’t wait to turn twenty-one. I wanted to be able to drink and gamble, legally. I am now twenty-two years old, and I wish that I could be a child again. I look back and feel that I grew up too quickly. I think the reason that I grew up so quickly, was due to the fact that I was friends with people who were older than myself....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1139 words
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James Joyce’s Dubliners - James Joyce’s Dubliners is a collection of short stories that aims to portray middle class life in Dublin, Ireland in the early twentieth century. Most of the stories are written with themes such as entrapment, paralysis, and epiphany, which are central to the flow of the collection of stories as a whole. Characters are usually limited financially, socially, and/or by their environment; they realize near the end of each story that they cannot escape their unfortunate situation in Dublin. These stories show Joyce’s negative opinion of the ancient Irish city .The final story, “The Dead,” was added later than the others; consequently, “The Dead” has a more positive tone and is often an exceptio...   [tags: James Joyce]
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1506 words
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Caught in a Landslide No Escape from Reality: Ulises by James Joyce - “A man’s errors are his portals of discovery.” James Joyce, an early twentieth century writer, said these words, and portrayed it often through his works. Often, his greater works discussed the way the mind works through realistic examples; one such example is the novel Ulysses, in which Joyce writes over 900 pages on one day of one man’s life. One specific short story, “Araby”, tells the story of a young boy who comes to an epiphany at the end of his story. Three crucial realizations the narrator comes too at the very end of this story are his curse of poverty, life’s lack of true meaning, and the shear anger and anguish that comes with the sadness of life....   [tags: poverty, frustration, sadness] 534 words
(1.5 pages)
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James Joyce's Dubliners - Dubliners In the story Dubliners by James Joyce, he writes about a few different themes, some of these being autonomy, responsibility, light, and dark. The most important of the themes though must be the individual character in the story against the community and the way they see it. I have chosen to take a closer look at “Araby,” “Eveline,” and “The Dead” because the great display of these themes I feel is fascinating. Many things affect the way the individual characters see the community, for example their family, friends, fellow citizens, or even new places....   [tags: Essays Papers] 1429 words
(4.1 pages)
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Growing Up in Dublin in The Dubliners - Growing Up in Dublin in The Dubliners Q) What picture do you think that Joyce gives of growing up in Dublinin the era when the book was written. A) While Joyce was growing up in Ireland he became disenchanted with his nation and the oppressive influence the Catholic Church had over the country. Joyce's intention when writing the book was to write a moral history of his country and he chose Dublin as it seemed to him to be the "centre of the paralysis" that seized it. The stories at the beginning of Dubliners are about youth and as the story progresses they concern older people and the last book is called The Dead....   [tags: Papers] 3035 words
(8.7 pages)
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Arby - Arby James Joyce's use of religious imagery and religious symbols in "Araby" is compelling. That the story is concerned somehow with religion is obvious, but the particulars are vague, and its message becomes all the more interesting when Joyce begins to mingle romantic attraction with divine love. "Araby" is a story about both wordly love and religious devotion, and its weird mix of symbols and images details the relationship--sometimes peaceful, sometimes tumultuos--between the two. In this essay, I will examine a few key moments in the story and argue that Joyce's narrator is ultimately unable to resolve the differences between them....   [tags: essays papers] 1404 words
(4 pages)
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Having No Control Over Life in Raymond Carver´s Jerry and Molly and Sally - As if miming their own personal experiences, authors use various plots, characters, and literary devices to paint the lack of control a person in society has over their own life in dark contrast against their desires. By doing this, the theme of control, with the help of desire and the monotony of life, explores the authors' viewpoints of humanity’s attempt at controlling their environment. In the short story “Jerry and Molly and Sally,” Raymond Carver uses the character of Al as a way to describe and explain the frustrations and anxiety of having no control of life while being stuck in an unfortunate set of circumstances, while desperately reaching for some sort of solution or rather anythi...   [tags: control, life, solution] 678 words
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A Similar Life Within A Story: Eveline by James Joyce - The heartache of losing a loved one is indescribable. Many people live out their lives based off how that one person would want them to live. James Joyce's short story, "Eveline," is an example of how promises are hard to break. As James Joyce writes his stories, his characters and themes share similarities within his own life, giving them more value and much more meaning behind the importance of the story. To begin with, "Eveline" is the story of a young teenager facing a dilemma where she has to choose between living with her father, who has beaten her in the past, and escaping with Frank, a sailor which she has been with for some time....   [tags: consciousness, catholics, paralysis]
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1434 words
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Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find - As humans, everybody thinks of themselves dying and whether or not they will go to heaven or hell. Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man is Hard to Find, presents the overall theme of death all throughout her story. She also talks about how racism is evil, specifically talking about the grandma. She also writes in this story, to let the readers know to appreciate what is around us. She writes about the evil in the world and makes reference to heaven and hell a lot and that ultimately god chooses who goes to hell and who goes to heaven....   [tags: A Good Man is Hard to Find Essays] 1204 words
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Analysis of The Novel Dubliners by James Joyce - In response to his publisher's suggested revisions to Dubliners, James Joyce "elevated his rhetoric to the nearly Evangelical [and wrote]: 'I seriously believe that you will retard the course of civilization in Ireland by preventing the Irish people from having one good look in my nicely polished looking-glass'"1. A pivotal part of this "looking-glass" is Joyce's representation of Dublin, which functions akin to an external unconsciousness in that a series of unrelated characters experience similar problems by virtue of their common connection to the city....   [tags: dublin, ireland, james joyce]
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James Joyce and the Dead - ... During his dance with Miss Ivors, he faces a barrage of questions about his non-existent nationalist sympathies, which he does not know how to answer appropriately. Unable to compose a full response, Gabriel blurts out that he is sick of his own country, surprising Miss Ivors and himself with his unmeasured response and his loss of control. Love seems impossible in “The Dead.” Lily is tired of the men who are “only all palaver and want they can get out of you,” and Gabriel’s aunts Julia and Kate and his cousin Mary Jane are all unmarried....   [tags: biographical and character analysis]
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James Joyce's "Dubliners" - James Joyce's "Dubliners" Throughout James Joyce’s “Dubliners” there are four major themes that are all very connected these are regret, realization, self hatred and Moral paralysis, witch is represented with the actual physical paralysis of Father Flynn in “The Sisters”. In this paper I intend to explore the different paths and contours of these themes in the four stories where I think they are most prevalent ,and which I most enjoyed “Araby”, “Eveline”, “The Boarding House”, and “A Little Cloud”....   [tags: James Joyce Dubliners Themes Essays] 1131 words
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James Joyce's The Dubliners - "Epiphany" refers to a showing-forth, a manifestation. For Joyce, however, it means a sudden revelation of the ¡°whatness of a thing¡±. Joyce's tales about Dublin portray impotence, frustration and death. Their meaning is provided not so much by plot but by the epiphanies. Aiming either to illustrate an instant of self-realization in the characters themselves, or to raise the trivial existence of his characters to a level of conscious significance for the reader. The figures inside the story whom are rapped by their environment are shown the truth about their lives, whereas readers are shown the whole process which, in its turn, becomes an epiphany for them....   [tags: essays research papers] 507 words
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James Joyce - In selecting James Joyce's Ulysses as the best novel of the twentieth century, Time magazine affirmed Joyce's lasting legacy in the realm of English literature. James Joyce (1882-1941), the twentieth century Irish novelist, short story writer and poet is a major literary figure of the twentieth-century. Regarded as "the most international of writers in English¡K[with] a global reputation (Attridge, pix), Joyce's stature in literature stems from his experimentation with English prose. Influenced by European writers and an encyclopedic knowledge of European literatures, Joyce's distinctive writing style includes epiphanies, the stream-of-consciousness technique and conciseness....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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James Joyce - Genius In short stories the narrator plays the most crucial role in the interaction between writer and reader. The choice of a narrator should help smoothly transfers the author's intentions. Joyce's story "Araby" is narrated in past tense and in first person by the protagonist. Joyce's decision to tell the story through this mouthpiece creates an avenue for Joyce to drive home his more complicated themes running through the story. The institution of religion is found throughout the entire plot as well as broader occult relations....   [tags: American Literature] 1150 words
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Exchanging Love for Death in James Joyce's Eveline from Dubliners - Exchanging Love for Death in Eveline   Like "Araby," "Eveline" is a story of young love, but unlike Mangan's sister, Eveline has already been courted and won by Frank, who is taking her away to marry him and "to live with him in Buenos Ayres" (49). Or has she. When she meets him at the station and they are set to board the ship, Eveline suddenly decides she cannot go with Frank, because "he would drown her" in "all the seas of the world" (51). But Eveline's rejection of Frank is not just a rejection of love, but also a rejection of a new life abroad and escape from her hard life at home....   [tags: Dubliners Essays] 831 words
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Essay on Character Movement in James Joyce's Dubliners - Character Movement in Dubliners          In a letter to his publisher, Grant Richards, concerning his collection of stories called Dubliners, James Joyce wrote: My intention was to write a chapter of the moral history of my country and I chose Dublin for the scene because that city seemed to me the centre of paralysis. I have tried to present it to the indifferent public under four of its aspects: childhood, adolescence, maturity, and public life. The stories are arranged in this order. I have written it for the most part in a style of scrupulous meanness and with the conviction that he is a very bold man who dares to alter in the resentment, still more to deform, whatever he has seen...   [tags: Dubliners Essays]
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Themes Of Betrayal In James Jo - Origins of the Theme of Betrayal in James Joyce's Dubliners Throughout his early years, certain people and events heightened Joyce's awareness of the hopelessly corrupt environment of Ireland that had betrayed so many of its own. The more profound of these enlightening inspirations were the betrayal and downfall of Charles Stewart Parnell, the indifference of Henrik Ibsen towards literary protests, the neglected native artistry of James Clarence Mangan, and Joyce's own role as Prefect. These occurrences provoked Joyce's bitter resentment towards Ireland, initiating the gradual alienation towards his church and homeland....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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2711 words
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Eveline, Dubliners and James Joyce - Eveline, Dubliners and James Joyce   "Eveline" is the story of a young teenager facing a dilemma where she has to choose between living with her father or escaping with Frank, a sailor which she has been courting for some time. The story is one of fifteen stories written by James Joyce in a collection called "Dubliners". These stories follow a certain pattern that Joyce uses to express his ideas: "Joyce's focus in Dubliners is almost exclusively on the middle-class Catholics known to himself and his family"(the Gale Group)....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Essays] 1498 words
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Hope and Despair in Poetry - The dictionary definition of hope is ‘a desire accompanied by expectation of or belief in fulfillment.’ The meaning of despair according to the dictionary is ‘the utter loss of hope.’ So we can see how these two terms are related. In Kundera’s “The Unbearable Lightness of Being,” the first time we see Tomas go through both of these emotions is when he dealing with the issue of his son. After his divorce he has some hope that he will remain a part of his son’s life with scheduled visits....   [tags: Poets, Poetry, Prose] 838 words
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Comparing Allah and God - Pakistan, 1986. Zahid was a Muslim priest who had been brought up to hate and kill those with conflicting beliefs, especially Christians. He often persecuted Christians in town, feeling that by doing so, he would please Allah (the Muslim god). One day when Zahid was persecuting Christians, someone dropped a Bible. Rather than disposing of it, as he normally would have, Zahid hung onto it because he felt compelled to read it and expose its errors. In short, Zahid converted to Christianity and shared the Bible’s teachings with everyone....   [tags: Comparison of Allah and God]
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3286 words
(9.4 pages)
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The Yellow Wall Paper - Stettler Hour 5 2/15/00 Modern Lit. Essay #1 In the early twentieth century a writers work usually represented ones surroundings. In the stories “Araby” by James Joyce and “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charolotte Gilman there are examples of their immediate surroundings taking affect in there writings. In most cases a person becomes what there surroundings are because that was the way they were raised....   [tags: essays research papers] 709 words
(2 pages)
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James Joyce - James Joyce James Joyce, an Irish novelist and poet, grew up near Dublin. James Joyce is one of the most influential novelists of the 20th century. In each of his prose works he used symbols to experience what he called an "epiphany", the revelation of certain revealing qualities about himself. His early writings reveal individual moods and characters and the plight of Ireland and the Irish artist in the 1900's. Later works, reveal a man in all his complexity as an artist and in family aspects....   [tags: essays research papers] 1720 words
(4.9 pages)
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The Beatles - When doing the reading for this weeks class I was struck by a quote form a deleted scene of my favorite movie, Pulp Fiction. Consequently, I went back to my Pulp Fiction DVD and watched this deleted scene. The quote is “there’s only two kinds of people in the world: ‘Beatles people’ and ‘Elvis people’. Now Beatles people can like Elvis, and Elvis people can like the Beatles...but nobody likes them equally. Somewhere you have to make a choice, and that choice tells you who you are.” - Mia Wallace....   [tags: Essay on The Beatles] 1308 words
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Reading - For as long as I can remember, I've loved to read: short stories, fiction, nonfiction sometimes, even philosophy if nothing else were available. This term I've been given more reading assignments than I can ever remember having to deal with. This term has been extra special because we studied no less than three types of literature: short stories, poetry, and drama. While I was in high school, a short story was a book with less than three hundred pages. This term I learned that even though a short story may be only a few pages long, there are chapters of interpretation, ambiguity, and symbolism to understand....   [tags: essays research papers] 448 words
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