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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Virginia Woolf"
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Analysis of Virginia Woolf´s Shakespeare´s Sister - ... Large numbers of potential artists are born, but most of these individuals have no opportunity to develop their skills. The quality of artistic achievement is extremely sensitive to initial condition, such a favorable environment and education. The most renowned artists arise in a thriving artistic climate. Artists simply cannot succeed in a hostile cultural environment. Virginia Woolf, in her essay Shakespeare’s Sister, believed that women artists would not succeed until they had money and a room of one’s own (Jacobus 700)....   [tags: artist, women, gender, domestic] 702 words
(2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse and Forster's Howards End - ... She helped the poor, she made clothes for her children, and she comforted her forlorn husband as best as she could. Woolf says, “So boasting of her capacity to surround and protect, there was scarcely a shell of herself left for her to know herself by; all was so lavished and spent” (41). Only by helping others does Mrs. Ramsay enjoy life. Her entire life as well as her perception and self-identity revolve around fulfilling what she believes are the needs of other people. On the other hand, Lily Briscoe says about herself, “there was her father; her home; even, had she dared to say it, her painting....”she liked to be alone; she liked to be herself; she was not made for that......   [tags: potential for personal growth, character analysis] 1146 words
(3.3 pages)
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Mystical Motifs in Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway - Mystical Motifs in Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway The scholarship surrounding Woolf’s mysticism by and large focuses on a psychoanalytical approach. While this paper will somewhat attempt to move away from a psychoanalytical methodology, it is valuable to examine the existing scholarship and the departures from this approach. Within this theoretical structure, the critical discussion further breaks down into two separate, though not incompatible, groups: those who see Woolf’s use of mysticism as a feminist statement and those who see Woolf as a mystic....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Mrs. Dalloway]
:: 7 Works Cited
1367 words
(3.9 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf was born Adeline Virginia Stephen, in 1882. She suffered immensely as a child from a series of emotional shocks (these are included in the biography of Virginia Woolf). However, she overcame these incredible personal damages and became a major British novelist, essayist and critic. Woolf also belonged to an elite group that included Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, Ezra Pound, and T.S. Eliot. Woolf pioneered in incorporating feminism in her writings. “Virginia Woolf’s journalistic and polemical writings show that she made a significant contribution to the development of feminist thought” (Dalsimer)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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1886 words
(5.4 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf In recent times there has been a renewed interest in Virginia Woolf and her work, from the Broadway play, “Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” to the Academy award nominated film “The Hours” starring Nicole Kidman. This recent exposure, along with the fact that I have ancestors from England , has sparked my interest in this twentieth century British novelist. During the early part of the twentieth century, artists and writers saw the world in a new way. Famed British novelist Virginia Woolf was very sensitive to this change, for she felt that human relationships such as ones between a husband and wife of master and servant were shifting, due to all of the political, religious, a...   [tags: Novelists Authors Writers Essays]
:: 11 Works Cited
1109 words
(3.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf, in her novels, set out to portray the self and the limits associated with it. She wanted the reader to understand time and how the characters could be caught within it. She felt that time could be transcended, even if it was momentarily, by one becoming involved with their work, art, a place, or someone else. She felt that her works provided a change from the typical egotistical work of males during her time, she makes it clear that women do not posses this trait. Woolf did not believe that women could influence as men through ego, yet she did feel [and portray] that certain men do hold the characteristics of women, such as respect for others and the ability to understand ma...   [tags: essays research papers] 413 words
(1.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf spends much of her time straddling the issues in ?A Room of One?s Own.. She carefully manipulates the reader by burying her points in flowery language and assumes the identity of another person so she does not have to take responsibility for what she says. She is very careful not to come off as too forceful or angry because she knows that her ideas will be disregarded if she does. Woolf is terrified of having her words labeled as ?feminist. and of attracting the stigma that the label is surrounded by....   [tags: Papers] 1272 words
(3.6 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - My Thought on Virginia Woolf There are many authors who have the ability to be one of the greatest writers of all time, but to my knowledge of books I believe the majority I read are excellent. Virginia Woolf to many, is a prominent writer. I wish I could say the same as well. I can not judge her writing for I have just began to study such remarkable essayists. I can state this, her ability to capture ones mind is unprecedented. She does it so well, it is almost natural. It is clear in all her writings she has the readers attention in full, while she explains facts in great detail....   [tags: essays research papers] 427 words
(1.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf was a very powerful and imaginative writer. In a "Room of Ones Own" she takes her motivational views about women and fiction and weaves them into a story. Her story is set in a imaginary place where here audience can feel comfortable and open their minds to what she is saying. In this imaginary setting with imaginary people Woolf can live out and see the problems women faced in writing. Woolf also goes farther by breaking many of the rules of writing in her essay....   [tags: essays research papers] 1166 words
(3.3 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Missing Works Cited The Victorian Era was a time of very rigid and strict lifestyles. In the 1900's there were special rules of conduct to be followed for everything. Victorian society required everyone to follow every protocol and nobody was excluded from these 'duties'. Victorians and Edwardians believed that there should be no awkward silences or pauses during conversations, it was considered impolite. It was also believed that people should dress for dinner every night regardless of the presence of company....   [tags: Biography Biographies Authors Writers Essays] 1561 words
(4.5 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf http://www.*.com/Reports/Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf. Edward Albee In Albee's play, he reveals the shallowness and meaninglessness of contemporary society, and exposes the falsity of "The American Dream". In doing this he refers to many different facets of society such as alcohol, social conventions, measures of success and corruption on a number of levels. Violence manifested in both language and action, reflect the frustration of the characters in not being able to live up to society's expectations....   [tags: Papers] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - An Author’s Brush Virginia Woolf is not unlike any other truly good artist: her writing is vague, her expression can be inhibited, and much of her work is up to interpretation from the spectator. Jacob’s Room is one of her novels that can be hard to digest, but this is where the beauty of the story can be found. It is not written in the blatant style of the authors before her chose and even writers today mimic, but rather Jacob’s Room appears more like a written painting than a book. It is as if Woolf appeared tired and bored of the black and white style of writing that dominated her culture and chose to use a paintbrush to write her story....   [tags: essays papers] 1249 words
(3.6 pages)
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Virginia Woolf’s Orlando - Virginia Woolf’s Orlando Born in the late nineteenth century, Virginia Woolf’s visionary mind emerged in a social climate that did not cultivate the intellectual development of women. In England’s waning Victorian era, the upper classes of women were encouraged to become nothing more than obedient wives, self-effacing mothers, servile hostesses, and cheerful, chattering tea-drinkers, expectations that Virginia Woolf shunned, renounced, and ultimately denounced in her writings. Beside being born into a patriarchal culture, Virginia Woolf was also born into a family headed by a man who made it clear that he "expected more from his sons than his daughters" (Bazin 4)....   [tags: Literary]
:: 10 Works Cited
1343 words
(3.8 pages)
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Feminism and Insanity in Virginia Woolf's Work - Feminism and Insanity in Virginia Woolf's Work The critical discussion revolving around the presence of mystical elements in Virginia Woolf's work is sparse. Yet it seems to revolve rather neatly around two poles. The first being a preoccupation with the notion of madness and insanity in Woolf's work and the second focuses on the political ramifications of mystical encounters. More specifically, Woolf's mysticism reflects on her feminist ideals and notions. Even though she ultimately associates Woolf's brand of mysticism with the 19th century Theosophists, she continually refers to the specific encounters in Woolf's work as "natural mysticism" (Kane 329)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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1109 words
(3.2 pages)
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Analysis of Similes in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse - Analysis of Similes in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse `Thoughts are made of pictures.' Our consciousness may be visualized as a photomontage of simultaneous impressions, mostly visual, according to poet John Ciardi (238). In verbalizing conscious experience, authors tend to use metaphor and simile to create images that, like words, possess both denotation, visual identification, and connotation, an emotional aura (Ciardi 239). In To the Lighthouse, by my count, Virginia Woolf employs over one hundred similes, figures of speech making an explicit comparison between two things essentially unlike, to enliven her description of things, places, and people....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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1756 words
(5 pages)
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The Contrast of Virginia Woolf and Alice Walker - The Contrast of Virginia Woolf and Alice Walker After reading the four essays assigned to this sequence, it becomes interesting to contrast two author's points of view on the same subject. Reading one professional writer's rewriting of a portion of another professional writer's essay brings out many of each of their characteristics and views. Also, the difference in writing styles could be drastic, or slight. Nevertheless, the writers display how versatile the English language can be. Alice Walker was born in 1944 as a farm girl in Georgia....   [tags: Writers Morals A Room of One's Own Essays] 1345 words
(3.8 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Use of Moments of Being - Virginia Woolf's Use of Moments of Being      Virginia Woolf is recognized as one of the great innovators of modern fiction. Her experiments with point of view and her use of stream of consciousness have influenced many writers that followed her. But one particularly interesting technique that does not seem to receive much attention is her use of "moments of being."   She first mentions moments of being in her essay, "A Sketch of the Past," which was to be the beginning of her memoirs....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
2552 words
(7.3 pages)
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Fleeting Connections in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse - Fleeting Connections in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse       In Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse, Mrs. Ramsay plays the role of a beautiful, dutiful wife and mother. She also is a peacekeeper, who struggles to find unity, even in situations where it seems that none can be found. Through Mrs. Ramsay's attempts to unify conditions, many characters experience an extreme sense of connection with her. Often, like Mrs. Ramsay's successful unifications, these connections are but fleeting ones, lasting only momentarily....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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1590 words
(4.5 pages)
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Importance of Brackets in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - Importance of Brackets in To The Lighthouse [Here Mr. Carmichael, who was reading Virgil, blew out his candle. It was midnight.] [Mr. Ramsay, stumbling along a passage one dark morning, stretched his arms out, but Mrs. Ramsay having died rather suddenly the night before, his arms, though stretched out, remained empty.] [Prue Ramsay died that summer in some illness connected with childbirth, which was indeed a tragedy, people said, everything, they said, had promised so well.] [A shell exploded....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 798 words
(2.3 pages)
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An Insightful Journey in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - An Insightful Journey in Woolf’s To The Lighthouse The lighthouse stands in the distance. It signifies a far off place that takes planning and work to reach. Depending on your perspective, the lighthouse may look different. It may appear large or small, short or tall, it may be dark and musty or bright and clear. Perspective is defined by Random House dictionary as "a broad view of events or ideas in their true nature and relationships". Virginia Woolf, in To The Lighthouse, takes an insightful journey into the true nature of relationships through the perspective of many different characters....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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Description of eclipse in "The Eclipse" by "Virginia Woolf" - Description of eclipse in "The Eclipse" by "Virginia Woolf" Virginia Woolf, English novelist, essayist, and critic has beautifully portrayed the natural phenomenon of eclipse. She has also enlightened the importance of the sun. She has narrated the essay dramatically and has regarded sun as an actor that was going to come on the stage to perform as if a drama was going on. The sky served as a stage. She has made the scene vivid and ravishing by the usage of colors, images and similes....   [tags: essays research papers] 695 words
(2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - A Modern Tragedy - Mrs. Dalloway - A Modern Tragedy           The narrative of Mrs. Dalloway may be viewed by some as random congealing of various character experience. Although it appears to be a fragmented assortment of images and thought, there is a psychological coherence to the deeply layered novel. Part of this coherence can be found in Mrs. Dalloway's psychological tone which is tragic in nature. In her forward to Mrs. Dalloway, Maureen Howard informs us that Woolf was reading both Sophocles and Euripides for her essays in The Common Reader while writing Mrs....   [tags: Woolf Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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3726 words
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Comparing Virginia Woolf and Emily Bronte - Comparing Virginia Woolf and Emily Bronte      Virginia Woolf and Emily Bronte possess striking similarities in their works.  Both works have inanimate objects as pivotal points of the story line.  For Bronte, Wuthering Heights itself plays a key role in the story.  The feel of the house changes as the characters are introduced to it.   Before Heathcliff, the Heights was a place of discipline but also love.  The children got on well with each other and though Nelly was not a member of the family she too played and ate with them.  When old Mr....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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886 words
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An Analysis of Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - An Analysis of Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Somewhere within the narrative of Mrs. Dalloway, there seems to lie what could be understood as a restatement - or, perhaps, a working out of - the essentially simple, key theme or motif found in Woolf's famous feminist essay A Room of One's Own. Mrs. Dalloway does in fact possess "a room of her own - " and enjoys an income (or the use of an income) that is at least "five hundred a year - " (Room: 164). But most importantly, Clarissa Dalloway also deals with ways of working out female economic necessity, personal space, and the manifestation of an "artistic" self-conception....   [tags: Mrs Dalloway]
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3340 words
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Virginia Woolf’s Between the Acts - Virginia Woolf’s Between the acts Virginia Woolf uses many images in the Between the Acts. Like the other novels I read in the class, the images in the Between the Acts cannot be separated with the story development, and the images themselves construct the story in the book by dismantling the conventional expectation for the novel. However, Woolf uses common and conventional words and images with an experimental way in this novel. This novel constructs the images and the representation with their conventional words and actions of the characters....   [tags: Between the Acts Essays]
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4852 words
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Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and Virginia Woolf - Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and Virginia Woolf       I chose to compare and contrast two women authors from different literary time periods.  Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861) as a representative of the Victorian age (1832-1901) and Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) as the spokeswoman for the Modernist (1914-1939) mindset.  Being women in historical time periods that did not embrace the talents and gifts of women; they share many of the same issues and themes throughout their works - however, it is the age in which they wrote that shaped their expressions of these themes.  Although they lived only decades apart their worlds were remarkably different - their voices were muted or ampl...   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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723 words
(2.1 pages)
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Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. Fun and Games – What are the games, and how much fun do people have. The play begins with George and Martha, who have just returned from a welcoming-party at the college. From the first moments of the play, the audience are made aware of the great differences between these two characters. Martha is said to be a “large, boisterous” woman, whereas George is referred to as a “thin” man, with hair that is going grey. Martha is an aggressive and loud woman, but George is passive and quiet....   [tags: English Literature] 2458 words
(7 pages)
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Comparing Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights - Comparing Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights share similarities in many aspects, perhaps most plainly seen in the plots: just as Clarissa marries Richard rather than Peter Walsh in order to secure a comfortable life for herself, Catherine chooses Edgar Linton over Heathcliff in an attempt to wrest both herself and Heathcliff from the squalid lifestyle of Wuthering Heights. However, these two novels also overlap in thematic elements in that both are concerned with the opposing forces of civilization or order and chaos or madness....   [tags: Compare contrast Woolf Bronte Essays] 1672 words
(4.8 pages)
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Putting the "Mod" in Modern: Modernist Authors - Ezra Pound summed up modernism in three short words: “Make it new.” It is an imperative that his fellow writers applied to their own works, severing with the realists, whose concepts of narrative were less radical and more reader-friendly. Whether consciously or not, writers like James Joyce and Virginia Woolf applied Pound’s dictate by breaking with convention and applying a variety of innovative techniques. Two of the most telling methods are among those described by postmodernist writer John Barth, who noted “the radical disruption of linear flow of narrative” and “the frustration of conventional expectations concerning unity and coherence of plot and character” (278)....   [tags: James Joyce, Virginia Woolf]
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1134 words
(3.2 pages)
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Rebecca West's The Return of the Soldier and Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room - Rebecca West's The Return of the Soldier and Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room Rebecca West and Virginia Woolf give great significance to the families of their respective main characters in The Return of the Soldier and Jacob’s Room because it gives the reader a greater insight to the formation of and reasoning for both Chris and Jacob’s nature. Each of these characters have multiple families to deal with: Chris has Kitty and Jenny on the one hand, and Margaret on the other, while Jacob deals with his mother and brother as well as his connections to society and academia....   [tags: Woolf West Soldier Jacob's Compare Essays] 2723 words
(7.8 pages)
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The Duchess and the Jeweller - “The Duchess and the Jeweller” by Virginia Woolf is a short story about Oliver, a poor man who has become a successful jeweler, and his interaction with a Duchess. In the story, Oliver struggles with the Duchess over social power, where she has the ability to cheat him by selling him fake pearls in exchange for a weekend spent with her daughter whom he is in love with – a classic battle of the sexes. While the conflict between man and woman is evident, Virginia Woolf uses flashback, point of view and imagery to also convey the dispute between the rich and the poor....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Virginia Woolf] 604 words
(1.7 pages)
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A room of one's own - Virginia Woolf's ambitious work A Room of One's Own tackles many significant issues concerning the history and culture of women's writing, and attempts to document the conditions which women have had to endure in order to write, juxtaposing these with her vision of ideal conditions for the creation of literature. Woolf's extended essay has endured and proved itself to be a viable, pioneering feminist piece of work, but the broad range of ideas and arguments Woolf explores leaves her piece open to criticism over certain concepts which seem to contradict themselves....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Virginia Woolf] 1898 words
(5.4 pages)
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The Death of a Moth - What started out as an ordinary day turned out to be one if the worst tragedies in the history of Bangladesh – the fire at Nimtoli in Dhaka. I sat in shock as I saw the news reports of the tragic incident showing numerous buildings on fire burning mercilessly, people running in havoc with no idea where loved ones are and yet others trapped inside the buildings, screaming, being burned alive. However, nothing seemed to have any effect on the ruthless fire which kept on burning, claiming as many lives as it could, turning a deaf ear to the desperate cries of hundreds of people....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Virginia Woolf] 1761 words
(5 pages)
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Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own: Women and Fiction - Many female writers see themselves as advocates for other creative females to help find their voice as a woman. Although this may be true, writer Virginia Woolf made her life mission to help women find their voice as a writer, no gender attached. She believed women had the creativity and power to write, not better than men, but as equals. Yet throughout history, women have been neglected in a sense, and Woolf attempted to find them. In her essay, A Room of One’s Own, she focuses on what is meant by connecting the terms, women and fiction....   [tags: Biography] 1151 words
(3.3 pages)
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Virginia Woolf’s Contributions to Feminism and the Academic Study of Gender - Virginia Woolf’s Contributions to Feminism and the Academic Study of Gender Born in 1882, Virginia Stephens began writing as a young girl. In 1904, Woolf published her first article and went on to teach at Morley College (Hort). Throughout her lifetime, she suffered from depression. Woolf had a vivid imagination; however, suffered nervous breakdowns and spells of depression. In 1941, at the age of 59, Woolf committed suicide. My goal in this paper is to explore how Woolf’s childhood, adolescents, and marriage impacted her writing, in particular A Room of One’s Own, ultimately leading to her contributions to feminism and the academic study of gender....   [tags: biography, women's emancipation]
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1138 words
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Flaws in the American Dream in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and The Death of a Salesman - ... Meanwhile Honey realizes that she is in fact not pregnant and it was all a result of hysteria. Martha seduces Nick, while George reads his book in a calm manner, however the when Martha and Nick head upstairs, George violently discards the book and declares the child dead. In the last act Martha has a soliloquy about their relationship, calling the guests to the living room afterwards. George rings a bell and arrives with a bouquet of snapdragons, which according to George, are "Flores para los muertos" meaning flowers for the dead in English....   [tags: success, struggle, deception]
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733 words
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Rhetorical Analysis on Virginia Woolf´s Speech Professions for Women - ... “You are able, though not without great labour and effort, to pay the rent. You are earning your five hundred pounds a year. But this freedom is only a beginning—the room is your own, but it is still bare. It has to be furnished; it has to be decorated; it has to be shared.” In this, she not only speaks of the physical rooms itself that these women are finally able to afford due to their own efforts, but the “rooms” or empty spaces in these women’s identities and the difficult task that they face in confronting old traditions and perspectives so that they are able to reconcile their past with their view of their future....   [tags: society, desire, metaphor] 874 words
(2.5 pages)
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World War I Veterans and Shell Shock in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf’s novel, Mrs. Dalloway, addresses life during the interwar years and more specifically the impact of shell shock on World War I veterans. Septimus Warren Smith, a survivor of the war, suffers daily through the trauma he endured in the war. Woolf highlights societies lack of understanding when it comes to the condition plaguing so many soldier after the war through characters like Dr. Holmes and Sir William Bradshaw. This along with propaganda glorifying the war and instilling the notion of manliness and strength in those that fought led to great misconceptions on the societies ignorance on soldiers suffering from shell shock....   [tags: Social Class Divide, Mental Illness]
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976 words
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A Woman Breaking out of Society and it’s Norms: Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - In Virginia Woolf’s “To the Lighthouse”, the struggle to secure and proclaim female freedom is constantly challenged by social normalcy. This clash between what the traditional female ideologies should be and those who challenge them, can be seen best in the character of Lily Brisco. She represents the rosy picture of a woman that ends up challenging social norms throughout the novel to effectively achieve a sense of freedom and individuality by the end. Woolf through out the novel shows Lily’s break from conventional female in multiply ways, from a comparison between her and Mrs.Ramsey, Lily’s own stream of consciousness, as well as her own painting....   [tags: Traditional Ideologies, Book Review]
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902 words
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The War is Over: Post World War I in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - War is an important theme in Mrs. Dalloway (1925), a post World War I text. While on the one hand there is the focus on Mrs. Dalloway’s domestic life and her ‘party consciousness’, on the other there are ideas of masculinity and “patriotic zeal that stupefy marching boys into a stiff yet staring corpse and perniciously public-spirited doctors” , and the sense of war reverberates in the entire text. Woolf’s treatment of the Great War is different from the normative way in which the War is talked about in the post world war I texts....   [tags: British Literature] 1672 words
(4.8 pages)
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Britain's Mindset of Grand Superiority in Virginia Woolf’s, Mrs. Dalloway - Nineteenth century Britain was a dominate empire across the globe. Despite the country’s loss of a major colonial force — the United States — the country still dominate world trade, allowing for a sense of pride to be installed within the hearts of the English. As exposed throughout Virginia Woolf’s, Mrs. Dalloway, the mindset of the British was one of grand superiority. Due to the success of the British empire's colonial expeditions, many British citizens felt as though their country was the greatest and most advanced in the world, creating a sense of superficial, self-centered, pride, as reflected through the character of Clarissa....   [tags: market, india, economoy]
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1298 words
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Social Oppression in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - The physical and social setting in "Mrs. Dalloway" sets the mood for the novel's principal theme: the theme of social oppression. Social oppression was shown in two ways: the oppression of women as English society returned to its traditional norms and customs after the war, and the oppression of the hard realities of life, "concealing" these realities with the elegance of English society....   [tags: Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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1475 words
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Queen Elizabeth I and Virginia Stephen-Woolf - There are two women from the near and distant past that have become strong female role models in recent years: Queen Elizabeth I and Virginia Woolf. These women were not without problems while growing up, though. Elizabeth’s mother was beheaded after being charged with treason when she was only three; she grew up viewing women as indispensable after her father had six wives; her family kept dying (mother, step mother, father, half brother, sister), and she was locked away by her sister Queen Mary in the Tower of London for a number of years....   [tags: Comparison Essay, Biographies] 914 words
(2.6 pages)
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Woolf's Advice for the Woman Artist - Women who want to escape the label "woman writer" (as opposed to writer--the masculine norm) have had to write like one of the boys, de-sexing themselves. Super-feminine lady writers, if they stick to their nice nook, will be both praised and despised for doing what comes naturally. But the woman writer who refuses these categories blows the scheme sky-high and incurs the wrath of the gods. (Michele Roberts in The Independent, 1997) Perhaps more than any other late-twentieth century British woman writer, Jeanette Winterson has taken to heart Woolf's advice in A Room of One's Own that "a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction" (4), but Winterson has also, as M...   [tags: Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own]
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2795 words
(8 pages)
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An analysis of Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - An analysis of To the Lighthouse Argument: Mrs. Ramsey is triumphant over Mr. Ramsey, by her awareness and intuitive feeling of the more important things in life: the value of human relationships. Though she is submissive, with no mention of extensive educational background, she innately possesses the crucial social skills that gain: the cohesion of the family as a whole; the respect and love of her children, and the continued survival of her marriage. Part I: The Window "Had there been an axe handy, or a poker, any weapon that would have gashed a hole in his father's breast and killed him, there and then, James would have seized it......   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 404 words
(1.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Narrative Technique in A Room of One's Own -   "Like most uneducated Englishwomen, I like reading." Can these words really belong to Virginia Woolf, an "uneducated Englishwoman" who knew half a dozen languages, who authored a shelf's length of novels and essays, who possessed one of the most rarified literary minds of the twentieth century. Tucked into the back pages of A Room of One's Own, this comment shimmers with Woolf's typically wry and understated sense of humor. She jests, but she means something very serious at the same time: as a reader, she worries about the state of the writer, and particularly the state of the female writer....   [tags: A Room of One's Own Essays]
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3126 words
(8.9 pages)
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Poetry in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Poetry in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own According to Laurence Perrine, author of Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense, "poetry is as universal as language and almost as ancient"; however, "people have always been more successful at appreciating poetry than at defining it" (517). Perrine initially defines poetry as "a kind of language that says more and says it more intensely than does ordinary language" (517). After defining literature as writing concerned with experience which allows us to imaginatively participate in it (518-19), Perrine adds, "poetry takes all life as its province" (522); no sharp distinction between poetry and other forms of imaginative literature exists (52...   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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1704 words
(4.9 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Style And Subject In A Room of One's Own - Times have changed since universities admitted only male students. Women have gained the right to educate themselves, and the division of the sexes in business has decreased dramatically. When Virginia Woolf wrote her essay A Room of One’s Own, however, there was a great lack of female presence in literature, in writing specifically. In the essay, Woolf critiques this fact by taking the reader on a journey through a day in the life at a fictional university to prove that although women are capable of critical thought and want to write great works of literature, they are unable to for lack of means....   [tags: A Room of One's Own]
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1850 words
(5.3 pages)
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Essay - Bridge Between Worlds in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - To the Lighthouse - Bridge Between Worlds Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse illustrates a bridge between the worlds of the Victorian mother and the modern, potentially independent woman. The Victorian woman was to be absorbed, as Mrs. Ramsay is, by the task of being mother and wife. Her reason for existing was to complete the man, rather than to exist in her own right. Mrs. Ramsay certainly sees this role for herself and is disturbed when she feels, momentarily, that she is better than her husband because he needs her support to feel good about himself and the life choices he has made....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 461 words
(1.3 pages)
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Comparing Albert Camus' The Stranger and Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse - Man's Place in Society and Nature in Albert Camus' The Stranger and Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse A general premise underlying the art of writing is that "language shapes and is shaped by the surrounding society" (McCarthy 41). Authors of an age attempt to effect a message through their writing, and inevitably this telegram to society reflects the temperament of the writer in reaction to his environment and historical context . In this light, Albert Camus' The Stranger (1942) and Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse (1927) are products of two separate cultures in an overlapping time period; Camus' sparse minimalistic prose and Woolf's lyrical, indulgent discourse represent two different...   [tags: compare and contrast essay examples]
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5428 words
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The Two-Dimensional Character of Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - To the Lighthouse                   The Two-Dimensional Character  In the novel, To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf illustrates the character of Mr. Ramsay, a husband and father of eight children.  As a husband, he degrades and mentally abuses his wife, Mrs. Ramsay, and as a father, he disparages and psychologically injures his children.  Yet, Mr. Ramsay has another side -- a second dimension.  He carries the traits of a very compassionate and loving husband and a securing and nurturing father....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 693 words
(2 pages)
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Character of Mr. Ramsay in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - The Character of Mr. Ramsay in To The Lighthouse       When reading novels, it is important to understand the aspects of each character to completely get the message that the author is trying to send to the reader.  In the novel, To The Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf illustrates the character, Mr. Ramsay as a husband and a father of eight.  As a husband, he mentally abuses his wife, Mrs. Ramsay, and as a father, Mr. Ramsay discourages and psychologically abuses his children to an extent that makes his children hate him.  Mr....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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793 words
(2.3 pages)
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Comparing Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse and Kawabata's Snow Country - Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse and Kawabata's Snow Country       Virginia Woolf's claim that plot is banished in modern fiction is a misleading tenet of Modernism. The plot is not eliminated so much as mapped out onto a more local level, most obviously with the epic structural comparison in Ulysses. In To the Lighthouse, Woolf's strategy of indirect discourse borrows much from Impressionism in its exploration of the ways painting can freeze a moment and make it timeless. In Kawabata's Snow Country, the story of Yoko and her family and its relationship to the rest of the novel corresponds with an even more modern medium, film, and its superimposition of contradictory image....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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1029 words
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Use of Metaphor inThe Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf - The essay The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf, is a piece of literature that describes the physical struggle of a dying moth and also, an inner struggle that the writer is experiencing as well. Through these struggles that each of the characters in the story endures, the audience sees a connection through both subjects. Analyzing and describing this complex essay structure can be done by evaluating the meaning and metaphors used by the author to portray the message of the story, which will allow the audience to comprehend what the true meaning of the essay is and come to understand the lesson of the story....   [tags: Analysis The Death of the Moth] 639 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Impact of Social Idealogy on Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - The Impact of Social Idealogy on Woolf's To the Lighthouse     Throughout literature the ideology of the society in which the author was living is evident in the text. This can cause certain groups within a text to be empowered while the other groups are marginalised and constrained by the social restrictions placed upon them by the ideology. In the novel To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf, Woolf shows us an awareness of gender politics during the 1920¹s Britain by subverting the traditional gender roles but at the same time naturalises notions of class causing certain groups to be constrained....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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1195 words
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Meaningless Existence in Virginia Woolf's Kew Gardens - Meaningless Existence in Virginia Woolf's Kew Gardens "Kew Gardens," by Virginia Woolf, is skillfully developed and written in such a manner as to be jammed full of images, ideas, and possibilities. One of the many ideas found in the story is the presentation of human existence as meaningless, random, and haphazard. Indeed, throughout the story, many images, words, and even plot structure support the fact that the lives of the characters of the story are lives without meaning or direction. Woolf presents the reader with characters whose lives are noticeably blurry and unfocused, undefined and haphazard, lived without direction, and full of distraction and interruption....   [tags: Search Our Mothers' Gardens Essays]
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1746 words
(5 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's A Room of One’s Own - In Virginia Woolf’s feminist essay “A Room of One’s Own,” Woolf argues that “a woman must have money and a room of her own” (16) if she is to write fiction of any merit. The point as she develops it is a perceptive one, and far more layered and various in its implications than it might at first seem. But I wonder if perhaps Woolf did not really tap the full power of her thesis. She recognized the necessity of the writer’s financial independence to the birth of great writing, but she failed to discover the true relationship to great writing of another freedom; for just as economic freedom allows one to inhabit a physical space---a room of one’s own---so does mental freedom allow one to i...   [tags: Literature Room of One's Own Papers]
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2616 words
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Death, Gender, and Social Roles in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - Death, Gender, and Social Roles in To the Lighthouse        To the Lighthouse is a book preoccupied by death, and gender is formulated by the difference in response to its threat. Women pursue immortality through creation of illusion and men through pursuance of facts. The novel questions the distinction between the sexes that became rigidified into pre-WWI gender roles which are exemplified in the institution of marriage. A younger generation fights against the rigidity of gender boundaries, Lily being the chief representative of this rebellion....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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5284 words
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Lily’s Reflections in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse - Lily’s Reflections in Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse Embodying the spirit of the female artist, Lily Briscoe in To the Lighthouse examines critical issues pertaining to her role in Virginia Woolf’s novel. In Part Three of the novel, Mrs. Ramsay’s legacy plays an especially important role in Lily’s thinking processes. Flowing experimentally like the sea that day, Lily’s thoughts encompass the novel’s themes of the passage of time, the role of the woman, and the role of the artist. Though time can break down physical matter, its prodding cannot disperse vivid memories....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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1359 words
(3.9 pages)
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Searching For Meaning in Virginia Woolf's Between the Acts - Searching For Meaning in Virginia Woolf's Between the Acts I wanted to examine the states at the limits of language; The moments where language breaks up...I wanted to examine the language which manifests these states of instability because in ordinary communication--which is organized, civilized--we repress these states of incandescence. Creativity as well as suffering comprises these moments of instability, where language, or the signs of language, or subjectivity itself are put into "process"....   [tags: Between the Acts Essays]
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3801 words
(10.9 pages)
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The Character of Clarissa Dalloway Created by Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf creates interesting contrast within the character of Clarissa Dalloway using stream of consciousness narration in her novel Mrs. Dalloway. Clarissa’s inner thoughts reveal a contrast between her lack of attraction to her husband due to her lesbian feelings and her fear of loosing him as a social stepping stone. These contrasts and many others can be seen throughout the novel using the literary device of stream of consciousness narration. Clarissa’s character reveals to us early in the book her lack of attraction to her husband....   [tags: essays research papers] 463 words
(1.3 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - Portrait of a Real Woman - To The Lighthouse - Portrait of a Real Woman Until To The Lighthouse, I had never read anything that so perfectly described women: wives, mothers, daughters and artists. I felt like shouting "Eureka!" on every page. These were my thoughts, beautifully written. Virginia Woolf writes of the essential loneliness and aloneness of human beings. In the first passage I am examining Mrs. Ramsay is the heart of the group gathered around the dinner table. It is because of her that they are assembled....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 720 words
(2.1 pages)
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Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf by Edward Albee - Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf by Edward Albee How a Couple Denies Reality by Escaping into a World of Fantasy --------------------------------------------------------------- INTRODUCTION Edward Albee’s account of the strange relationship between George and Martha was an award-winning Broadway play and a cinema classic. As a drama, it succeeds on all levels. But like all great dramatic works, it is much more than an absorbing story.To understand their mutual cruelty and their failure to accept the world around them, we must understand why they are what they are....   [tags: English Literature]
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1576 words
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Existence of Reality in Christopher Durang's Beyond Therapy and Edward Albee's Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Existence of Reality in Christopher Durang's Beyond Therapy and Edward Albee's Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf. Growing up, I always assumed that my parents would grow old together. I fantasized about introducing my future children to their still-married grandparents and attending, if not personally planning, my parent’s fiftieth anniversary celebration. Although my parents fought and struggled with areas of perpetual disagreement, somehow things always worked out and in my naivety, I believed they always would....   [tags: Durang Albee Real Reality Woolf Beyond Essays] 1089 words
(3.1 pages)
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Styles Used in Orlando by Virginia Woolf and One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez - ... The creation of a fictional community was also depicted by Marquez in his book, One Hundred Years of Solitude when the Buendia family’s forefather, Jose Arcadio Buendia sleeps and dreams of a place where he and his family could go and live a good life. Upon waking up, he found a place along the riverbank and called it Macondo that was a fictional perfect community. In the early 19th century, Woolf wrote the book and this work put the female gender into the lime light, tackling the gender issues and the woman inferiority to man....   [tags: gender change, spanish society] 771 words
(2.2 pages)
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Cultural Disenchantment in a Postwar Climate Illustrated in Virginia Woolf’s Novel Mrs. Dalloway - One of the principal themes in Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs. Dalloway is the English people’s collective loss of confidence in the state of the British Empire after the First World War. Set in London in the June of 1923, the novel opens at the close of a global war that lasted only four years but cost the United Kingdom more than 100,000 lives and permanently shifted the political boundaries and social world order of its people. Each of the novel’s many characters represent a different aspect of the English citizens’ disenchantment with established, presupposed cultural values and worldview brought about by the unexpected lack of glory in victory or dignity in the dead and wounded multitudes....   [tags: Mrs. Dalloway, argumentative, persuasive]
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2194 words
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Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Simone De Beauvoir, and Virginia Woolf: Champions of Equality for Women - Many philosophers have argued that freedom should be applied to men in society. They argue that men should have both physical freedom and the liberty to express themselves. However, not many philosophers take into account the freedom and equality that women should have by nature. In the women’s case, equality is a necessary condition of freedom. In the works by women philosophers Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Simone De Beauvoir, and Virginia Woolf, an analysis on their works shows that these authors believe equality is absolutely a necessary condition of freedom for women....   [tags: philosophy, equality]
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1523 words
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Women Seeing the World through a Different Lens in Three Guineas and The Years - At the time Virginia Woolf wrote The Years and Three Guineas, there were many differences between men and women, one of which was education. Most women were not educated, which prevented them from entering into agency. Women allowed themselves to be played by history. In order for them to change a world that was dominated by men, women needed to refuse what history said was their essence, and rather, use that essence to create critical ways of being in the world. The photograph, "a crudely colored photograph--of your world as it appears to us who see it from the threshold of the private house; through the shadow of the veil that St....   [tags: American Literature Virginia Woolf]
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2563 words
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An Abstract View of Death in Mrs.Dalloway and The Hours - An Abstract View of Death in Mrs.Dalloway and The Hours Works Cited Missing In Mrs. Dalloway and The Hours contradictory and almost altered views of death are presented. Virginia Woolf and Michael Cunningham portray death as escape for some, but an entrapment for others. It is no longer treated as a subject to worry about or fear, which society now views it as. A line from Shakespeare's Cymbeline, "Fear no more the heat o' the sun / Nor the furious winter rages," sums up what the authors of Mrs....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Michael Cunningham] 1675 words
(4.8 pages)
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Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. In Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. the major thematic concerns are those involving perception versus reality. In the beginning of the play, both couples seem to be average, loving couples of the nineteen-fifties. Even George and Martha seem to be playful in their insults toward each other. Things do not start to turn until George warns Martha not to “start in about the bit with the kid”, after which both of them begin to get more hostile toward each other....   [tags: essays research papers] 514 words
(1.5 pages)
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Imposing Our Own Ideological Frameworks onto Virginia Woolf and Her Writing - Imposing Our Own Ideological Frameworks onto Virginia Woolf and Her Writing Whenever we try to imagine the feelings or motives of a writer, we impose our own thoughts and ideas, our own biases, onto that person and their work. Perhaps in order to justify our choices or legitimate the philosophies that we hold dear, we interpret texts so that they fall into place in our own ideological frameworks. Literature, because it engages with the most important and passionate questions in life, evokes responses in readers that emanate not only from the mind but also from the subconscious and from the deepest places in the heart....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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3778 words
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Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room - Jacob Flanders, Many Things to Many Readers - Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room - Jacob Flanders, Many Things to Many Readers Listless is the air in an empty room, just swelling the curtain; the flowers in the jar shift. One fibre in the wicker arm- chair creaks, though no one sits there. - Jacob's Room The year 1922 marks the beginning of High Modernism with the publications of T. S. Eliot's The Wasteland, James Joyce's Ulysses, and Virginia Woolf's Jacob's Room. Woolf's novel, only her third, is not generally afforded the iconic worship and critical praise so often attached to those works of her most famous male contemporaries....   [tags: Jacob's Room Essays]
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4385 words
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Division of Labor According to Gender in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Division of Labor According to Gender in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf, in her treatise A Room of One's Own, identified a gendered division of labor. For her, men work in the market place and make the money while the women, the upper class women at least, attend to the social pleasantries and household management. While she lamented this state of affairs, she did not present, as Gilman did, a model for existence that would allow men and women to operate on the same level....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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883 words
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The Contempt and Bitterness of Virginia Woolf Exposed in A Room of One's Own - The Contempt and Bitterness of Virginia Woolf Exposed in A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf refuses the role society prescribes her. She stands up against glass ceilings, separate spheres, and double standards-cultural institutions that create and uphold a weaker sex. In her writing, specifically "A Room of One's Own," she manifests her contempt and bitterness by advocating "it is necessary [for women] to have five hundred [pounds] a year and a lock on the door if you are to write fiction or poetry" (769)....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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1918 words
(5.5 pages)
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"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" Articulates the Crises of Contemporary Western Civilization - Edward Albee's (1928) play Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf. (1961-62) exhibits concern with the crises of faith of contemporary western civilization. This thematic concern is rooted in two sources. First it establishes a link with the dramatists of the thirties such as Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953), Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) and Arthur Miller (1915-2005). These dramatists had in their plays critiqued America as it moved from "confidence to doubt." In a land of success they wrote obsessively of the unsuccessful....   [tags: American Literature] 880 words
(2.5 pages)
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War in the Works of Virginia Woolf, Siegfried Sassoon, and Wilfred Owen - War in the Works of Virginia Woolf, Siegfried Sassoon, and Wilfred Owen     War has the ability to destroy not only countries and society, but families and individuals as well.  Adverse effects are often the outcome of a war.  It is not looked at in a positive way and often causes conflict.  Through the works of Virginia Woolf, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, and the 1992 Welsh film Hedd Wyn the effects of war are made apparent.  All of them express their representations of war differently; however, the works have many similarities as well....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 1512 words
(4.3 pages)
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Comparing Orlando by Virginia Woolf, Laughter in the Dark by Vladimir Nabokov and Orlando by Sally - Comparing Orlando by Virginia Woolf, Laughter in the Dark by Vladimir Nabokov and Orlando by Sally Potter The novels, Orlando by Virginia Woolf and Laughter in the Dark by Vladimir Nabokov, as well as the film, Orlando, written and directed by Sally Potter, are all self-reflexive, or metafictional, i.e., they draw our attention to the processes and techniques of writing and the production of cinema. All three share similarities and differences in setting, narrative technique, characterization and theme....   [tags: Movie Film Comparison Contrast Compare]
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3482 words
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Individual and Society in Virginia Woolf's Novel "mrs Dalloway" - According to Viktors Ivbulis (1995: 23 - 29) in Modernist fiction a special attention is paid to an individual who degrades because of the pressure from the society and is therefore shown as a small part of the society being unable to do miracles. Moreover, the 20th century's fight for the power makes the rights of an individual be dependent on the rights of the society. This individual is not a personality anymore that was established in the 19th century literature. It is a simple person, who is depressed by the highly technological world and the demands of the society and is therefore lonesome and isolated....   [tags: European Literature] 1047 words
(3 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot - Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot are representative works of two separate movements in literature: Modernism and Post-Modernism. Defining both movements in their entirety, or arguing whether either work is truly representative of the classifications of Modernism and Post-Modernism, is not the purpose of this paper; rather, the purpose is to carefully evaluate how both works, in the context of both works being representative of their respective traditions, employ the use of symbolism and allusion....   [tags: Modernism, Post-Modernism]
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2439 words
(7 pages)
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Male and Female Relations in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - Male and Female Relations in To The Lighthouse           To The Lighthouse exemplifies the condition of women when Woolf was writing and to some extent yet today. It offers a solution to remedy the condition of both men and women. To say the novel is a cry for a change in attitude towards women is not quite correct. It shows the plight of both men and women and how patriarchy is detrimental to both genders. Mrs. Ramsey. Both suffer from the unequal division of gender power in Woolf's society....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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2883 words
(8.2 pages)
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