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Your search returned 200 essays for "Virginia Woolf":
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The Duchess And The Jeweler by Virginia Woolf - The Duchess and the Jeweler is the story of the world's greatest jeweler who had promised his mother to become the richest jeweler in the world in his childhood but now that his dream has materialized he does not feel satisfied. So trying to achieve satisfaction, knowingly he buys fake pearls from a Duchess in exchange for passing a whole weekend with her daughter whom he is in love with. The purpose of this essay is to show how Virginia Woolf has successfully presented the inner mind of the characters, their struggle and their communication through the least amount of verbal communication among them....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Duchess Jeweler] 1572 words
(4.5 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway It is apparent throughout the Virgina Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway that the character development and complexity of the female characters of the story are concentrated on far more than their male counterparts. It is my feelings that the magnitude of this character development comes about because of the observations and feelings of the main character Mrs....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Dalloway] 1125 words
(3.2 pages)
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Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf For this book talk, I read an Edward Albee's play, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf." I saw the movie version of this book, which I found excellent, so it inspired me to read the book. The book begins when George, who is an associate professor of a New England college, and Martha, who is the daughter of the college professor comes home after a faculty party. Although it is well after midnight and they are heavily drunk, Martha invites another couple, Nick who is a new and young professor in the college, and his wife Honey....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf Essays] 665 words
(1.9 pages)
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New Beginnings in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - New Beginnings in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf   Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf is a disturbing and powerful work. Ironically, it is disturbing and powerful for many of the same reasons. As the audience watches George and Martha tear savagely at each other with the knives of hurled words, sharpened on pain and aimed to draw blood, the way in which these two relentlessly go at each other is awful to see, yet strangely familiar. Like wounded animals, they strike out at those closest to them, and reminds one of scenes witnessed as a child between screaming parents from a cracked door when one is supposed to be in bed....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf] 1723 words
(4.9 pages)
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Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own - Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own Though published seventy years ago, Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own holds no less appeal today than it did then. Modern women writers look to Woolf as a prophet of inspiration. In November of 1929, Woolf wrote to her friend G. Lowes Dickinson that she penned the book because she "wanted to encourage the young women–they seem to get frightfully depressed" (xiv). The irony here, of course, is that Woolf herself eventually grew so depressed and discouraged that she killed herself....   [tags: Virginia Woolf A Room of One’s Own]
:: 2 Works Cited
1324 words
(3.8 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf was born in London, as the daughter of Julia Jackson Duckworth, a member of the Duckworth publishing family, and Sir Leslie Stephen, a literary critic, a friend of Meredith, Henry James, Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, and George Eliot, and the founder of the Dictionary of National Biography. Leslie Stephen's first wife had been the daughter of the novelist William Makepeace Thackeray. His daughter Laura from the first marriage was institutionalized because of mental retardation....   [tags: Author Writer Biography Woolf] 1700 words
(4.9 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway In Jacob's Room, the novel preceding Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf works with many of the same themes she later expands upon in Mrs. Dalloway. To Mrs. Dalloway, she added the theme of insanity. As Woolf stated, "I adumbrate here a study of insanity and suicide; the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side." However, even the theme that would lead Woolf to create a double for Clarissa Dalloway can be viewed as a progression of other similar ideas cultivated in Jacob's Room....   [tags: Novel Analysis Dalloway Woolf] 737 words
(2.1 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf, in her novels, set out to portray the self and the limits associated with it. She wanted the reader to understand time and how the characters could be caught within it. She felt that time could be transcended, even if it was momentarily, by one becoming involved with their work, art, a place, or someone else. She felt that her works provided a change from the typical egotistical work of males during her time, she makes it clear that women do not posses this trait. Woolf did not believe that women could influence as men through ego, yet she did feel [and portray] that certain men do hold the characteristics of women, such as respect for others and the ability to understand ma...   [tags: essays research papers] 413 words
(1.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - My Thought on Virginia Woolf There are many authors who have the ability to be one of the greatest writers of all time, but to my knowledge of books I believe the majority I read are excellent. Virginia Woolf to many, is a prominent writer. I wish I could say the same as well. I can not judge her writing for I have just began to study such remarkable essayists. I can state this, her ability to capture ones mind is unprecedented. She does it so well, it is almost natural. It is clear in all her writings she has the readers attention in full, while she explains facts in great detail....   [tags: essays research papers] 427 words
(1.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Missing Works Cited The Victorian Era was a time of very rigid and strict lifestyles. In the 1900's there were special rules of conduct to be followed for everything. Victorian society required everyone to follow every protocol and nobody was excluded from these 'duties'. Victorians and Edwardians believed that there should be no awkward silences or pauses during conversations, it was considered impolite. It was also believed that people should dress for dinner every night regardless of the presence of company....   [tags: Biography Biographies Authors Writers Essays] 1561 words
(4.5 pages)
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Diagnosing Septimus Smith in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Diagnosing Septimus Smith in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Virginia Woolf’s novel, Mrs. Dalloway, features a severely mentally ill man named Septimus Smith. Throughout the novel the reader glimpses moments of Septimus’s dementia and how his poor frazzled wife, Rezia, deals with him. Septimus, who has returned from the war and met Rezia in Italy on his discharge, has a seriously skewed version of reality. He has been through traumatic events during the war, including the death of his commanding officer and friend, Evans....   [tags: Woolf Dalloway Literature Analysis] 1424 words
(4.1 pages)
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To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf - To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf Reading To the Lighthouse was more than just another literary experience for me. Virginia Woolf wrote in such a way that challenged my mind, spoke to my emotions and in essence she shut me up and made me listen. Listening was not hard seeing that she had much to say and a unique way of saying it. I found a sensitivity in Woolf's work that I appreciated as it is not a style seen in the work of today. I am only afraid that due to its subtlety, it may go unnoticed by some of my generation of readers....   [tags: Papers] 544 words
(1.6 pages)
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Comparing Virginia Woolf and Emily Bronte - Comparing Virginia Woolf and Emily Bronte      Virginia Woolf and Emily Bronte possess striking similarities in their works.  Both works have inanimate objects as pivotal points of the story line.  For Bronte, Wuthering Heights itself plays a key role in the story.  The feel of the house changes as the characters are introduced to it.   Before Heathcliff, the Heights was a place of discipline but also love.  The children got on well with each other and though Nelly was not a member of the family she too played and ate with them.  When old Mr....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
886 words
(2.5 pages)
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Description of eclipse in "The Eclipse" by "Virginia Woolf" - Description of eclipse in "The Eclipse" by "Virginia Woolf" Virginia Woolf, English novelist, essayist, and critic has beautifully portrayed the natural phenomenon of eclipse. She has also enlightened the importance of the sun. She has narrated the essay dramatically and has regarded sun as an actor that was going to come on the stage to perform as if a drama was going on. The sky served as a stage. She has made the scene vivid and ravishing by the usage of colors, images and similes....   [tags: essays research papers] 695 words
(2 pages)
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Woolf's Advice for the Woman Artist - Women who want to escape the label "woman writer" (as opposed to writer--the masculine norm) have had to write like one of the boys, de-sexing themselves. Super-feminine lady writers, if they stick to their nice nook, will be both praised and despised for doing what comes naturally. But the woman writer who refuses these categories blows the scheme sky-high and incurs the wrath of the gods. (Michele Roberts in The Independent, 1997) Perhaps more than any other late-twentieth century British woman writer, Jeanette Winterson has taken to heart Woolf's advice in A Room of One's Own that "a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction" (4), but Winterson has also, as M...   [tags: Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own]
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2795 words
(8 pages)
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An analysis of Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - An analysis of To the Lighthouse Argument: Mrs. Ramsey is triumphant over Mr. Ramsey, by her awareness and intuitive feeling of the more important things in life: the value of human relationships. Though she is submissive, with no mention of extensive educational background, she innately possesses the crucial social skills that gain: the cohesion of the family as a whole; the respect and love of her children, and the continued survival of her marriage. Part I: The Window "Had there been an axe handy, or a poker, any weapon that would have gashed a hole in his father's breast and killed him, there and then, James would have seized it......   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 404 words
(1.2 pages)
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Essay - Bridge Between Worlds in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - To the Lighthouse - Bridge Between Worlds Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse illustrates a bridge between the worlds of the Victorian mother and the modern, potentially independent woman. The Victorian woman was to be absorbed, as Mrs. Ramsay is, by the task of being mother and wife. Her reason for existing was to complete the man, rather than to exist in her own right. Mrs. Ramsay certainly sees this role for herself and is disturbed when she feels, momentarily, that she is better than her husband because he needs her support to feel good about himself and the life choices he has made....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 461 words
(1.3 pages)
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The Two-Dimensional Character of Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - To the Lighthouse                   The Two-Dimensional Character  In the novel, To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf illustrates the character of Mr. Ramsay, a husband and father of eight children.  As a husband, he degrades and mentally abuses his wife, Mrs. Ramsay, and as a father, he disparages and psychologically injures his children.  Yet, Mr. Ramsay has another side -- a second dimension.  He carries the traits of a very compassionate and loving husband and a securing and nurturing father....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 693 words
(2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - Portrait of a Real Woman - To The Lighthouse - Portrait of a Real Woman Until To The Lighthouse, I had never read anything that so perfectly described women: wives, mothers, daughters and artists. I felt like shouting "Eureka!" on every page. These were my thoughts, beautifully written. Virginia Woolf writes of the essential loneliness and aloneness of human beings. In the first passage I am examining Mrs. Ramsay is the heart of the group gathered around the dinner table. It is because of her that they are assembled....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 720 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Duchess and the Jeweller - “The Duchess and the Jeweller” by Virginia Woolf is a short story about Oliver, a poor man who has become a successful jeweler, and his interaction with a Duchess. In the story, Oliver struggles with the Duchess over social power, where she has the ability to cheat him by selling him fake pearls in exchange for a weekend spent with her daughter whom he is in love with – a classic battle of the sexes. While the conflict between man and woman is evident, Virginia Woolf uses flashback, point of view and imagery to also convey the dispute between the rich and the poor....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Virginia Woolf] 604 words
(1.7 pages)
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Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. In Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. the major thematic concerns are those involving perception versus reality. In the beginning of the play, both couples seem to be average, loving couples of the nineteen-fifties. Even George and Martha seem to be playful in their insults toward each other. Things do not start to turn until George warns Martha not to “start in about the bit with the kid”, after which both of them begin to get more hostile toward each other....   [tags: essays research papers] 514 words
(1.5 pages)
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Kew Garden's Summary - In "Kew Gardens," the narrator follows different visitors to the gardens, giving the reader brief snapshots of their lives through small descriptions as they reach the same flowerbed. The story begins with a description of the oval-shaped flowerbed. The flowers are red, yellow, and blue. They have petals that are heart or tongue shaped. As the petals fall to the ground, they stain the earth with these colors for a moment. Petals from the flowers soar through the sky in the summer breeze. The flowers' colors flash in the air....   [tags: Virginia Woolf] 1548 words
(4.4 pages)
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Social Oppression in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - The physical and social setting in "Mrs. Dalloway" sets the mood for the novel's principal theme: the theme of social oppression. Social oppression was shown in two ways: the oppression of women as English society returned to its traditional norms and customs after the war, and the oppression of the hard realities of life, "concealing" these realities with the elegance of English society....   [tags: Mrs. Dalloway Essays]
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1475 words
(4.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own Proves Students Need Schools of Their Own - Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own Proves Students Need Schools of Their Own According to the Children’s Defense Fund, in 1989 an average of 1,375 children dropped out of school every day. As a future educator, my reaction to this figure is one of horror and disbelief. Once I get past the shock of such a figure and the obligatory rhetorical questions: How could we let this happen?, I become an investigator. I begin to look for patterns in the profiles of students who have failed. I consider the curriculum these students ingest and how it is fed to them....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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3422 words
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A Room of Ones Own - A Room of Ones Own Hundreds of years ago, an unconscious culture diseased the female population. Similar to Shakespeare's sister, women were conditioned to conform to a feminine ideology. This concept of femininity spread through out the country essentially defining the nature of a woman and robbing them of their innate sense of self. While women may have dreamed about the day when their creative spirit could be unleashed, those dreams were quickly interrupted by the powerful grasp of male dominance....   [tags: Classics, Feminism, Woman's Right, Virginia Woolf] 323 words
(0.9 pages)
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Processing Emotions in Mrs. Dalloway and Demonology - Processing Emotions in Mrs. Dalloway and Demonology Hold them in or let them out; typically these are the only two options one has in dealing with their everyday emotions. Over time, making this decision has differed greatly. The transition between holding in your emotions and letting them out can be seen between two writers from two different eras. In Virginia Woolf’s Mrs.Dalloway, she portrays people in upper class England during the first half of the 20th century and how they process their emotions....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Rick Moody Social Classes Essays] 1468 words
(4.2 pages)
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Viriginia Woolf - Viriginia Woolf (this essay has problems with the format) One of the greatest female authors of all time, Virginia Woolf, produced a body of writing respected worldwide. Driven by uncontrollable circumstances and internal conflict, her life was cut short by suicide. Her role in feminism, along with the personal relationships in her life, influenced her literary works. Virginia's relationships throughout her life contributed, not only to her literature, but the quality of her life as well. Perhaps the greatest influence in Virginia's life is her mother, Julia Stephen....   [tags: Author Viriginia Woolf feminism relationships]
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1952 words
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Virginia Wolf - TEST NO. 1, QUESTION 1 In Virginia Woolf’s two passages describing two very opposite meals that was served at the men’s college and the other at the women’s college; reflects Woolf’s attitude toward women’s place in society. When Woolf describes her meal at the men’s college she describes in such a way that implies luxury and choice. The syntax and diction work with Woolf to possess this tone, “many, various, rewards, succulent, and heaven” all contribute to Woolf’s view on men. The implication is she sees that men are of superiority to women further more the fact that men have choices in means is parallel with the idea that they have choices in society a la voting....   [tags: essays research papers] 332 words
(0.9 pages)
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Cunningham's The Hours: The Mind of Virginia Wolf - While writing a fiction novel, I would think that the writer would have to dig deep into their mind and into their heart in order for them to convey realistic emotions through their characters. This process could almost be related to hypnosis where the writer relies on his or her inner thoughts and feelings to effectively add depth to their novel's fictitious characters. In the novel Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf used a technique called stream-of-consciousness in which she attempted to write the novel in the same patterns as her brain's thought process....   [tags: Cunningham Hours Essays]
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1950 words
(5.6 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf http://www.*.com/Reports/Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf. Edward Albee In Albee's play, he reveals the shallowness and meaninglessness of contemporary society, and exposes the falsity of "The American Dream". In doing this he refers to many different facets of society such as alcohol, social conventions, measures of success and corruption on a number of levels. Violence manifested in both language and action, reflect the frustration of the characters in not being able to live up to society's expectations....   [tags: Papers] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
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Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. Power Struggles are very common is many marriages. In Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, by Edward Albee, the relationship or marriage between George and Martha is based in power. The power struggle between George and Martha has become the basis of their relationship. Their love has turned into hate. The only connection they have is through their insults and the series of games they play. The power struggle between George and Martha develops is reveled and is resolved through out the play....   [tags: World Literature] 751 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Duchess and the Jeweller by Virginia Woolf - THE DUCHESS AND THE JEWELLER Oliver Bacon, the jeweller, is really the only developed character in the short story “The Duchess and the Jeweller” by Virginia Woolf. The author uses the indirect stream-of consciousness technique as well as her own words to depicts the enterprising merchant as a many-sided man: He is both ambitious and sympathetic. The jeweller is highly arrogant and ambitious. His strutting smugness is evident through the animal metaphors used to portray him-from his physical bearing (“his nose was long and flexible, like an elephant’strunk”), to his ambition compared to a “giant hog” snuffing for truffles or a “camel sees the blue lake.”He reveals his heart’s deepest pas...   [tags: essays research papers] 461 words
(1.3 pages)
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To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf - To The Lighthouse published in 1927, by Virginia Woolf. Set directly before and after World War I, the story follows the lives of a small group of people, (specifically Mr. Ramsay, Mrs. Ramsay, and Lily Briscoe) as they navigate through their daily lives each facing and striving to overcome their individual conflicts while in the Isle of Skye, of the Hebrides (a group of islands west of Scotland) on vacation. But before I go more in depth regarding this group of people and their struggles, I will first provide some context (plus my presentation wasn’t long enough)....   [tags: brief biography, struggles] 667 words
(1.9 pages)
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Use of Metaphor inThe Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf - The essay The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf, is a piece of literature that describes the physical struggle of a dying moth and also, an inner struggle that the writer is experiencing as well. Through these struggles that each of the characters in the story endures, the audience sees a connection through both subjects. Analyzing and describing this complex essay structure can be done by evaluating the meaning and metaphors used by the author to portray the message of the story, which will allow the audience to comprehend what the true meaning of the essay is and come to understand the lesson of the story....   [tags: Analysis The Death of the Moth] 639 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Character of Clarissa Dalloway Created by Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf creates interesting contrast within the character of Clarissa Dalloway using stream of consciousness narration in her novel Mrs. Dalloway. Clarissa’s inner thoughts reveal a contrast between her lack of attraction to her husband due to her lesbian feelings and her fear of loosing him as a social stepping stone. These contrasts and many others can be seen throughout the novel using the literary device of stream of consciousness narration. Clarissa’s character reveals to us early in the book her lack of attraction to her husband....   [tags: essays research papers] 463 words
(1.3 pages)
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Individual and Society in Virginia Woolf's Novel "mrs Dalloway" - According to Viktors Ivbulis (1995: 23 - 29) in Modernist fiction a special attention is paid to an individual who degrades because of the pressure from the society and is therefore shown as a small part of the society being unable to do miracles. Moreover, the 20th century's fight for the power makes the rights of an individual be dependent on the rights of the society. This individual is not a personality anymore that was established in the 19th century literature. It is a simple person, who is depressed by the highly technological world and the demands of the society and is therefore lonesome and isolated....   [tags: European Literature] 1047 words
(3 pages)
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Characterization in To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolfe - Characterization in To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolfe Virginia Woolfe was truly talented author, who wrote in the 1920's. She was considered a gifted woman and a pioneer for feminist authors yet she was plagued by mental illness from her youth until her suicide. She suffered from manic depression that was said to have been aggravated by her troubled youth. She experienced many traumas, including the death of her mother at age 13 and sexual abuse by her stepbrother at the age of 12. However Woolf was able to find temporary escape from her illness by using the characters in her novels to express her unusual and often disturbing thoughts and feelings about herself and the world around he...   [tags: Papers] 1343 words
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Mrs. Dalloway By Virginia Wool - In Virginia Woolf’s book, Mrs. Dalloway, Clarissa Dalloway and Septimus Warren Smith grow up under the same social institutions although social classes are drawn upon wealth; it can be conceived that two people may have very similar opinions of the society that created them. The English society which Woolf presents individuals that are uncannily similar. Clarissa and Septimus share the quality of expressing through actions, not words. Through these basic beliefs and idiosyncrasies, both characters mimic each other through their actions and thoughts, even though they never meet....   [tags: essays research papers] 783 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Theme of Mental Health Illustrated in Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway and Cunningham's The Hours - ‘Mrs. Dalloway’, by Virginia Woolf is a derivative text of ‘The Hours’, written by Michael Cunningham. The novels both share an important theme of mental health. The circumstances of mental health are commonly sympathetic, and empathetic. The characters Septimus and Clarissa in ‘Mrs. Dalloway’ and Richard, Laura Brown, and Virginia Woolf in ‘The Hours’ show the strongest symbols for this theme. Most of the problems and treatments these characters face are in direct result of the age they live in....   [tags: Literary Comparison, Literary Analysis] 453 words
(1.3 pages)
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The Death of the Moth, by Virginia Woolf - The battle against death, while can be portrayed as magnificent, is ultimately pathetic and insignificant. Like a boulder tipping precariously off a cliff, one can exhibit the ardent desire to survive, yet against the fragility and impermanence of life, this desire is a pitiful effort in the face of impending failure. The hopelessness of such a situation is depicted in “The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf, in which the moth incessantly endeavors to overcome the irresolvable dilemma of breaking through the barriers that contain it and visit the outside world....   [tags: The Death of the Moth, Virginia Woolf] 725 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf - ‘The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf      Death is a difficult subject for anyone to speak of, although it is a part of everyday life. In Virginia Woolf’s “The Death of the Moth”, she writes about a moth flying about a windowpane, its world constrained by the boundaries of the wood holding the glass. The moth flew, first from one side, to the other, and then back as the rest of life continued ignorant of its movements. At first indifferent, Woolf was eventually moved to pity the moth. This story shows that life is as strange and familiar as death to us all....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Death Moth Essays]
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760 words
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The Set of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - The Set of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.         For a play as drastically depressing and oppressive as Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, the set needs to augment the mood as much as possible. Albee’s play calls for several props, and all of these have to be provided, but more than that, the set needs to look as real as possible, to show that these people are not vastly different from the rest of us. And because in that fact the true horror of the play resides the set is all-important. Luckily, the performance featured a realistic, intricate, close set....   [tags: Whos Afraid Virginia Woolf] 875 words
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Humor and Tragedy in Virginia Woolf's Orlando - Virginia Woolfe's "Orlando" uses both humor and tragedy to observe humanity's often absurd and eccentric superficial constructions, both of class and gender. Woolfe creates the distinctions between male and female but continuously shatters them to reveal the illusions we create about gender. As George Meredith suggests, comedy is created when "The comic poet dares to show us men and women coming to this mutual likeness" (15). Woolfe, however, goes beyond simply bringing men and women together as equals; she blends them together as one androgynous individual, the effect of which causes us to laugh at the artificial way in which society attempts to define gender....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays] 652 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Outsider in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - The Outsider in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own In A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf writes: "I had no wish to enter had I the right, and this time the verger might have stopped me, demanding perhaps my baptismal certificate, or a letter if introduction from the dean"(8). This particular line jumps out at me for several reasons. First off, I find it rather humorous. I was rather surprised by this remark as well. I did not think that I would be reading anything that would make me laugh even the slightest bit....   [tags: Virginia Woolf A Room of One's Own]
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761 words
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Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women and Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women - It is as if a window finally cracks open revealing the sun’s rays brightening with the truth that men and women experience different challenges. Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women has to face the music when applied to Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women. In Tannen’s essay the claim that “[t]here is no unmarked women” has trouble withstanding but manages to hold up Woolf’s position of the battle women fought against the traditional norm to the freedom they can possess. First and foremost, Tannen claims that all women are “unmarked” and that leaves the essay with room for doubt....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, Deborah Tannen]
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905 words
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Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. Edward Albee was an American playwright producer and director. He was born on March 12, 1928 probably in Virginia. He was adopted at an early age, which influenced him to write about characters that are different. His writings were characterized by realism; fidelity to life as perceived and experienced, and were considered to be absurd dramas. Albee, in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, portrays a primitive sex struggle between a middle aged couple; the relationship between George and Martha is acted out in a series of games in which one sex dominates the other through unapparent love, weapons that each have mastered, and the most hurtful insult,...   [tags: Edward Albee Afraid Virginia Woolf Essays] 956 words
(2.7 pages)
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Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway - Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway revolves around several of the issues that preoccupied the Bloomsbury writers and thinkers as a group. Issues of androgyny, class, madness, and mythology run throughout the novel. While that is hardly an exhaustive list, these notions seem to form the core of the structure of the novel. Woolf herself, when envisioning the project, sought to produce “a study of insanity and suicide, the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side.” This issue of madness, in particular, gives the novel its form as we follow the twinned lives of Septimus Warren Smith and Clarissa Dalloway....   [tags: Woolf] 624 words
(1.8 pages)
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Virginia Woolf and Contemporary Feminism - Virginia Woolf (1882 – 1941), a prominent English writer and feminist, was considered one of the twentieth-century’s most remarkable modernist novelists. The well-known works of Virginia Woolf are often closely related to the development of feminist reproach. With that being said, she was a rather distinguished writer in relation to the modernist movement as well. Virginia Woolf certainly restructured the novel, experimenting with her flow of thoughts and imageries. Although, not always appearing to be the work of clear organization or even solid structure for that matter....   [tags: english writer, modernism, biography]
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916 words
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The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf - The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf "The Death of the Moth," written by Virginia Woolf, explains the brief life of a moth corresponding with the true nature of life and death. In this essay, Woolf puts the moth in a role that represents life. Woolf makes comparisons of the life outside to the life of the moth. The theme is the mystery of death and the correspondence of the life of the moth with the true nature of life. The images created by Woolf are presented that appeal to the eye. For instance, the moth's body during the death is appealing to the eye....   [tags: Papers] 747 words
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Night and Day by Virginia Woolf - ... “His eyes were bright…he scarcely knew whether they beheld dreams or reality”. This personification of the eyes, as if it was the eyes only were the observers of the reality and dreams and not the human, shows Ralph confusion about the world he is living in. It seems like he is trapped at the frontier of two different dimensions where the realities in each of them are mixed together to create the absurdity he was seeing at that moment. His imagination and his world being the same entity in his head, he could not think nor act at that precise moment....   [tags: text analysis] 637 words
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Psychiatric Evaluation and Diagnosis of Virginia Woolf - I have chosen to write about Virginia Woolf, a British novelist who wrote A Room of One’s Own, To the Lighthouse and Orlando, to name a few of her pieces of work. Virginia Woolf was my first introduction to feminist type books. I chose Woolf because she is a fantastic writer and one of my favorites as well. Her unique style of writing, which came to be known as stream-of-consciousness, was influenced by the symptoms she experienced through her bipolar disorder. Many people have heard the word "bipolar," but do not realize its full implications....   [tags: Bipolar Disorder]
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Virginia Woolf: Just a Misunderstood Women - Virginia Woolf can be considered one of the most influential authors of her time, she has helped pave the way for the female gender for generations, and possibly generations to come. Using her feminist approach to get her voice heard, Virginia Woolf was able to get her point across in a powerful yet meaningful way. My research of Virginia Woolf involved looking at her life to determine why she turned out the way she did, and why she wrote the way she wrote. From her early childhood, Virginia Woolf had a rough upbringing....   [tags: feminism, gender, discrimination, literature, rape]
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Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and Virginia Woolf - Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and Virginia Woolf       I chose to compare and contrast two women authors from different literary time periods.  Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861) as a representative of the Victorian age (1832-1901) and Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) as the spokeswoman for the Modernist (1914-1939) mindset.  Being women in historical time periods that did not embrace the talents and gifts of women; they share many of the same issues and themes throughout their works - however, it is the age in which they wrote that shaped their expressions of these themes.  Although they lived only decades apart their worlds were remarkably different - their voices were muted or ampl...   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - ... The books “had been written in the red light of emotion,” she says, “and not in the white light of truth” (33), meaning that the men Beton speaks of are responding to something—some feeling or condition that they, as a sex identifying with one another, are sensing, rather than merely expressing a natural fact as their rhetoric seems to suggest. If this is true, what reason do they have for being so critical. Men are obviously the rulers of society—the ones who establish societal norms and determine the hierarchy of humankind, as well as how their female counterpart fit into that hierarchy....   [tags: anger at societal change]
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Virginia Woolf: A Room of Her Own - ... As many may think, women are treated equally in the present because of the feminist movement. Actually, there are women in third-world countries that are denied access to education and schooling because of their gender. Feminism, over the years, has become socially known with the publishing of more than thirty national feminist news and opinion magazines. The feminist movement occurred in three “waves”. The first wave began in the 19th century and ended in the 20th century. It was the first time the word feminism was ever brought up and the ideas were spoken and shared amongst women....   [tags: thought provoking feminist author] 641 words
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Importance of Brackets in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - Importance of Brackets in To The Lighthouse [Here Mr. Carmichael, who was reading Virgil, blew out his candle. It was midnight.] [Mr. Ramsay, stumbling along a passage one dark morning, stretched his arms out, but Mrs. Ramsay having died rather suddenly the night before, his arms, though stretched out, remained empty.] [Prue Ramsay died that summer in some illness connected with childbirth, which was indeed a tragedy, people said, everything, they said, had promised so well.] [A shell exploded....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 798 words
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A Room Of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf - Throughout history, women writers used pen names and pseudonyms to avoid the eyes of the patriarchal society. The female writers were no strangers to harsh criticism from the gender-biased readers regarding their artistic works. However such emphasis on gender discrimination coined the words, feminism and sexism, which now reflect on the past and the present conflicts. In the book A Room Of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf tracks down the history of women and fiction to find the answer. She argues, “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction”....   [tags: A Room Of One’s Own] 835 words
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Analysis of Virginia Woolf´s Shakespeare´s Sister - ... Large numbers of potential artists are born, but most of these individuals have no opportunity to develop their skills. The quality of artistic achievement is extremely sensitive to initial condition, such a favorable environment and education. The most renowned artists arise in a thriving artistic climate. Artists simply cannot succeed in a hostile cultural environment. Virginia Woolf, in her essay Shakespeare’s Sister, believed that women artists would not succeed until they had money and a room of one’s own (Jacobus 700)....   [tags: artist, women, gender, domestic] 702 words
(2 pages)
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The Phantoms of Society in Virginia Woolf´s Progessions for Women - ... Woolf did not want to follow the angel’s instructions, so she killed the ghost. She puts it: “Had I not killed her she would have killed me. She would have plucked the heart out of my writing.” (2274) This angel, though created to help the public function, was restraining Woolf’s creativity and sense of freedom. When Woolf killed the angel, she was not allowing society’s expectations affect her and was much happier. In Doris Lessing’s “To Room Nineteen”, Susan Rawlings is a prime example of someone living by the phantoms’ orders....   [tags: ideals, society, ambiguity, control, expected] 814 words
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Character of Mr. Ramsay in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - The Character of Mr. Ramsay in To The Lighthouse       When reading novels, it is important to understand the aspects of each character to completely get the message that the author is trying to send to the reader.  In the novel, To The Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf illustrates the character, Mr. Ramsay as a husband and a father of eight.  As a husband, he mentally abuses his wife, Mrs. Ramsay, and as a father, Mr. Ramsay discourages and psychologically abuses his children to an extent that makes his children hate him.  Mr....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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Childhood Tribulation in Virginia Woolf’s novel: To the Lighthouse - ... Ramsay venture into town he discloses that he grew up in an impoverished family. He goes on to explain that he was never able to experience the circus as a young boy so the thought of it brings him painful memories. Although not going to the circus would be a hefty disappointment for a child, the lasting pain that Tansley feels from the rejection is the saddest part. That small amount of rejection that Tansley felt as a child grew into so much more as time went on and evolved into other emotions such as resentment, anger, and bitterness....   [tags: Impact, Rejection]
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The Death of a Moth - What started out as an ordinary day turned out to be one if the worst tragedies in the history of Bangladesh – the fire at Nimtoli in Dhaka. I sat in shock as I saw the news reports of the tragic incident showing numerous buildings on fire burning mercilessly, people running in havoc with no idea where loved ones are and yet others trapped inside the buildings, screaming, being burned alive. However, nothing seemed to have any effect on the ruthless fire which kept on burning, claiming as many lives as it could, turning a deaf ear to the desperate cries of hundreds of people....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Virginia Woolf] 1761 words
(5 pages)
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Rhetorical Analysis on Virginia Woolf´s Speech Professions for Women - ... “You are able, though not without great labour and effort, to pay the rent. You are earning your five hundred pounds a year. But this freedom is only a beginning—the room is your own, but it is still bare. It has to be furnished; it has to be decorated; it has to be shared.” In this, she not only speaks of the physical rooms itself that these women are finally able to afford due to their own efforts, but the “rooms” or empty spaces in these women’s identities and the difficult task that they face in confronting old traditions and perspectives so that they are able to reconcile their past with their view of their future....   [tags: society, desire, metaphor] 874 words
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Division of Labor According to Gender in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Division of Labor According to Gender in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf, in her treatise A Room of One's Own, identified a gendered division of labor. For her, men work in the market place and make the money while the women, the upper class women at least, attend to the social pleasantries and household management. While she lamented this state of affairs, she did not present, as Gilman did, a model for existence that would allow men and women to operate on the same level....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" Articulates the Crises of Contemporary Western Civilization - Edward Albee's (1928) play Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf. (1961-62) exhibits concern with the crises of faith of contemporary western civilization. This thematic concern is rooted in two sources. First it establishes a link with the dramatists of the thirties such as Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953), Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) and Arthur Miller (1915-2005). These dramatists had in their plays critiqued America as it moved from "confidence to doubt." In a land of success they wrote obsessively of the unsuccessful....   [tags: American Literature] 880 words
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A Woman Breaking out of Society and it’s Norms: Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - In Virginia Woolf’s “To the Lighthouse”, the struggle to secure and proclaim female freedom is constantly challenged by social normalcy. This clash between what the traditional female ideologies should be and those who challenge them, can be seen best in the character of Lily Brisco. She represents the rosy picture of a woman that ends up challenging social norms throughout the novel to effectively achieve a sense of freedom and individuality by the end. Woolf through out the novel shows Lily’s break from conventional female in multiply ways, from a comparison between her and Mrs.Ramsey, Lily’s own stream of consciousness, as well as her own painting....   [tags: Traditional Ideologies, Book Review]
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Britain's Mindset of Grand Superiority in Virginia Woolf’s, Mrs. Dalloway - ... While Britain controlled India, the already established caste system grew and deepened. Publically disapproving of the caste system, the British imposed social regulations to divide the British from Indians and “Anglo-Indians” (a racial blend of Indians and the British that was considered to be socially unacceptable) (Kaul, BBC News). Segregation between races was common and enforced. The caste system was only one of the many negative effects on the native Indian population. Indians were highly taxed, producing a debt in order to create a larger, unnecessary army and drained the economy in order to fund the unwanted bureaucratic government (Kaul, BBC News)....   [tags: market, india, economoy]
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Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse – Role of Wife and Mother - To the Lighthouse – Role of Wife and Mother Woolf portrays the character of Mrs. Ramsay as a self sacrificing woman and mother as defined through her interactions with men: Charles Tansley, Mr. Carmichael, Paul, Mr. Bankes, Mr. Ramsay, and James. During Mrs. Ramsay's lifetime she is admired by most of these men, and is continually striving to be esteemed by all of them, at any sacrifice to herself. Although there is goodness in Mrs. Ramsay, not unselfishly given, there are also rising questions of this representation of mother by Woolf, primarily put forth through the characters of Lily and Mrs....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 645 words
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Queen Elizabeth I and Virginia Stephen-Woolf - There are two women from the near and distant past that have become strong female role models in recent years: Queen Elizabeth I and Virginia Woolf. These women were not without problems while growing up, though. Elizabeth’s mother was beheaded after being charged with treason when she was only three; she grew up viewing women as indispensable after her father had six wives; her family kept dying (mother, step mother, father, half brother, sister), and she was locked away by her sister Queen Mary in the Tower of London for a number of years....   [tags: Comparison Essay, Biographies] 914 words
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Styles Used in Orlando by Virginia Woolf and One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez - ... The creation of a fictional community was also depicted by Marquez in his book, One Hundred Years of Solitude when the Buendia family’s forefather, Jose Arcadio Buendia sleeps and dreams of a place where he and his family could go and live a good life. Upon waking up, he found a place along the riverbank and called it Macondo that was a fictional perfect community. In the early 19th century, Woolf wrote the book and this work put the female gender into the lime light, tackling the gender issues and the woman inferiority to man....   [tags: gender change, spanish society] 771 words
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Parallels to the Author in To The Lighthouse, by Virginina Woolf - Virginia Woolf's 'To the Lighthouse' is a fine example of modernist literature, like her fellow modernist writers James Joyce and D.H Lawrence. This novel in particular is of the most autobiographical. The similarities between the story and Woolf's own life are not accidental. The lighthouse, situations and deaths within the novel are all parallel to Woolf's childhood, she wrote in her diary 'I used to think of [father] & mother daily; but writing The Lighthouse, laid them in my mind ….(I believe this to be true – that I was obsessed by them both, unheathily; & writing of them was a necessary act)....   [tags: Modernist Literature] 759 words
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Narrative Theory in Virgina Woolf's To the Lighthouse - Beginning, Plot, Sequence, Closure: Teaching To the Lighthouse Narrative theory is extremely useful in teaching modernist fiction; its revival in the beginning of the twentieth century may be a direct response to the practices of modernist fiction. One of the most important components of narrative theory is what I call narrative dynamics, or the related issues of presentation of the story from the choice of beginning point, through the arrangement of linear and nonlinear sequences of events, to the function of the ending....   [tags: To the Lighthouse Essays]
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Who’s Afraid of Virgina Woolf by Edward Albee - ... At a given time ona character may be fully dominant and may torture the other character but shift of dominance is occurring frequently and relationship between the characters shift dramatically thoughout the drama. Albee expresses the characters sardonic and sadistic pleasure by causing the pain to each other. The play provides a vital insight into the American life. Albee resonates the decline of American dream with the Virginia woolf throught the play . He attacks the dreams and self-deceptions that forms American mythology.Albee puts a powerful question to his audience: who is afraid of life without any illusions....   [tags: controversial playwrights, voices] 1218 words
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Mrs. Dolloway by Virignia Woolf - ... Based on text study, Septimus has been diagnosed with schizophrenia, which is a mental illness closely linked with hallucinations and gradual dissociation with ones emotions, thoughts, and behaviors (Class Notes – AP Psychology). While on active duty, Septimus suffered through several traumatic events. After dispatch, Septimus met Lucrezia in Italy, married her, and came to England, where he had constant hallucinations. The prominent hallucination in the novel was that of his close friend and commanding officer, Evans, who died in battle....   [tags: veterans, hallucinations, war]
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The Life and Work of Virginia Woolf - From the early death of her mother at age 13 to the sexual abuse from her own half brothers led to the many mental and emotional breakdowns that made Virginia Woolf, “one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century…” (“Virginia Woolf” n.page.). Woolf’s, “Kew Gardens”, is a classic short story written in 1919 that shows the importance of women’s rights and illustrates that even when you are surrounded by people you still can feel empty and alone. This significant story reflects Virginia’s life filled with depression even though she was a great success and had a happy marriage....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, ]
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Clothing and Gender in Virginia Woolf's Orlando - Clothing and Gender in Virginia Woolf's Orlando In her novel Orlando, Virginia Woolf tells the story of a man who one night mysteriously becomes a woman. By shrouding Orlando's actual gender change in a mysterious religious rite, we readers are pressured to not question the actual mechanics of the change but rather to focus on its consequences. In doing this, we are invited to answer one of the fundamental questions of our lives, a question that we so often ignore because it seems so very basic - what is a man....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays]
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The Importance of Birds in Virginia Woolf's The Waves - The Importance of Birds in Virginia Woolf's The Waves      To emphasize her viewpoint in The Waves, Woolf employs a distinctive style.  She interlocks the dramatic monologues of six characters at successive stages in their lives to tell her story; and prefaces each of the sections with a descriptive passage of sun and waves through a single day.  In these passages descriptions of the sun, the sea, the plants, and the birds make implicit comparisons with the characters' speeches.  The actions of the birds in the descriptive passages most strikingly parallel the developing consciousness of the characters, exemplified by Susan....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Waves Essays Papers]
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Pagan Elements in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Pagan Elements in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf   "I am preoccupied with history" George observes in Act I (p. 50) of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. But his relationship with his wife, Martha, seems to lean almost towards anthropology. Pagan social and religious elements in Albee's work seem to clarify and enhance the basic themes of the play.             Pagan trappings adorn the whole structure of the play: the prevalence of alcohol, the "goddamn Saturday night orgies" (p....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf] 1119 words
(3.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf In recent times there has been a renewed interest in Virginia Woolf and her work, from the Broadway play, “Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” to the Academy award nominated film “The Hours” starring Nicole Kidman. This recent exposure, along with the fact that I have ancestors from England , has sparked my interest in this twentieth century British novelist. During the early part of the twentieth century, artists and writers saw the world in a new way. Famed British novelist Virginia Woolf was very sensitive to this change, for she felt that human relationships such as ones between a husband and wife of master and servant were shifting, due to all of the political, religious, a...   [tags: Novelists Authors Writers Essays]
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf spends much of her time straddling the issues in ?A Room of One?s Own.. She carefully manipulates the reader by burying her points in flowery language and assumes the identity of another person so she does not have to take responsibility for what she says. She is very careful not to come off as too forceful or angry because she knows that her ideas will be disregarded if she does. Woolf is terrified of having her words labeled as ?feminist. and of attracting the stigma that the label is surrounded by....   [tags: Papers] 1272 words
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