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Your search returned 200 essays for "Virginia Woolf":
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A Room of Ones Own - A Room of Ones Own Hundreds of years ago, an unconscious culture diseased the female population. Similar to Shakespeare's sister, women were conditioned to conform to a feminine ideology. This concept of femininity spread through out the country essentially defining the nature of a woman and robbing them of their innate sense of self. While women may have dreamed about the day when their creative spirit could be unleashed, those dreams were quickly interrupted by the powerful grasp of male dominance....   [tags: Classics, Feminism, Woman's Right, Virginia Woolf] 323 words
(0.9 pages)
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Virginia Wolf - TEST NO. 1, QUESTION 1 In Virginia Woolf’s two passages describing two very opposite meals that was served at the men’s college and the other at the women’s college; reflects Woolf’s attitude toward women’s place in society. When Woolf describes her meal at the men’s college she describes in such a way that implies luxury and choice. The syntax and diction work with Woolf to possess this tone, “many, various, rewards, succulent, and heaven” all contribute to Woolf’s view on men. The implication is she sees that men are of superiority to women further more the fact that men have choices in means is parallel with the idea that they have choices in society a la voting....   [tags: essays research papers] 332 words
(0.9 pages)
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An analysis of Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - An analysis of To the Lighthouse Argument: Mrs. Ramsey is triumphant over Mr. Ramsey, by her awareness and intuitive feeling of the more important things in life: the value of human relationships. Though she is submissive, with no mention of extensive educational background, she innately possesses the crucial social skills that gain: the cohesion of the family as a whole; the respect and love of her children, and the continued survival of her marriage. Part I: The Window "Had there been an axe handy, or a poker, any weapon that would have gashed a hole in his father's breast and killed him, there and then, James would have seized it......   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 404 words
(1.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf, in her novels, set out to portray the self and the limits associated with it. She wanted the reader to understand time and how the characters could be caught within it. She felt that time could be transcended, even if it was momentarily, by one becoming involved with their work, art, a place, or someone else. She felt that her works provided a change from the typical egotistical work of males during her time, she makes it clear that women do not posses this trait. Woolf did not believe that women could influence as men through ego, yet she did feel [and portray] that certain men do hold the characteristics of women, such as respect for others and the ability to understand ma...   [tags: essays research papers] 413 words
(1.2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf - My Thought on Virginia Woolf There are many authors who have the ability to be one of the greatest writers of all time, but to my knowledge of books I believe the majority I read are excellent. Virginia Woolf to many, is a prominent writer. I wish I could say the same as well. I can not judge her writing for I have just began to study such remarkable essayists. I can state this, her ability to capture ones mind is unprecedented. She does it so well, it is almost natural. It is clear in all her writings she has the readers attention in full, while she explains facts in great detail....   [tags: essays research papers] 427 words
(1.2 pages)
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The Duchess and the Jeweller by Virginia Woolf - THE DUCHESS AND THE JEWELLER Oliver Bacon, the jeweller, is really the only developed character in the short story “The Duchess and the Jeweller” by Virginia Woolf. The author uses the indirect stream-of consciousness technique as well as her own words to depicts the enterprising merchant as a many-sided man: He is both ambitious and sympathetic. The jeweller is highly arrogant and ambitious. His strutting smugness is evident through the animal metaphors used to portray him-from his physical bearing (“his nose was long and flexible, like an elephant’strunk”), to his ambition compared to a “giant hog” snuffing for truffles or a “camel sees the blue lake.”He reveals his heart’s deepest pas...   [tags: essays research papers] 461 words
(1.3 pages)
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Essay - Bridge Between Worlds in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - To the Lighthouse - Bridge Between Worlds Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse illustrates a bridge between the worlds of the Victorian mother and the modern, potentially independent woman. The Victorian woman was to be absorbed, as Mrs. Ramsay is, by the task of being mother and wife. Her reason for existing was to complete the man, rather than to exist in her own right. Mrs. Ramsay certainly sees this role for herself and is disturbed when she feels, momentarily, that she is better than her husband because he needs her support to feel good about himself and the life choices he has made....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 461 words
(1.3 pages)
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The Character of Clarissa Dalloway Created by Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf creates interesting contrast within the character of Clarissa Dalloway using stream of consciousness narration in her novel Mrs. Dalloway. Clarissa’s inner thoughts reveal a contrast between her lack of attraction to her husband due to her lesbian feelings and her fear of loosing him as a social stepping stone. These contrasts and many others can be seen throughout the novel using the literary device of stream of consciousness narration. Clarissa’s character reveals to us early in the book her lack of attraction to her husband....   [tags: essays research papers] 463 words
(1.3 pages)
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Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. In Edward Albee’s play Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. the major thematic concerns are those involving perception versus reality. In the beginning of the play, both couples seem to be average, loving couples of the nineteen-fifties. Even George and Martha seem to be playful in their insults toward each other. Things do not start to turn until George warns Martha not to “start in about the bit with the kid”, after which both of them begin to get more hostile toward each other....   [tags: essays research papers] 514 words
(1.5 pages)
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To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf - To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf Reading To the Lighthouse was more than just another literary experience for me. Virginia Woolf wrote in such a way that challenged my mind, spoke to my emotions and in essence she shut me up and made me listen. Listening was not hard seeing that she had much to say and a unique way of saying it. I found a sensitivity in Woolf's work that I appreciated as it is not a style seen in the work of today. I am only afraid that due to its subtlety, it may go unnoticed by some of my generation of readers....   [tags: Papers] 544 words
(1.6 pages)
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Death in Mrs. Dalloway - ... When running her errand, she plummets into deep thought about her death and what would follow it, Did it matter then, she asked herself... that she must inevitably cease completely; all this must go on without her; did she resent it; or did it not become consoling to believe that death ended absolutely. But somehow in the streets of London, on the ebb and flow of things, here, there, she survived,...she being part... of the trees at home; of the house there, ugly, rambling, all to bits and pieces as it was; part of people she had never met; being laid out like a mist between the people she knew best......   [tags: Virginia Woolf novel] 575 words
(1.6 pages)
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Childhood Tribulation in Virginia Woolf’s novel: To the Lighthouse - ... Ramsay venture into town he discloses that he grew up in an impoverished family. He goes on to explain that he was never able to experience the circus as a young boy so the thought of it brings him painful memories. Although not going to the circus would be a hefty disappointment for a child, the lasting pain that Tansley feels from the rejection is the saddest part. That small amount of rejection that Tansley felt as a child grew into so much more as time went on and evolved into other emotions such as resentment, anger, and bitterness....   [tags: Impact, Rejection]
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592 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Duchess and the Jeweller - “The Duchess and the Jeweller” by Virginia Woolf is a short story about Oliver, a poor man who has become a successful jeweler, and his interaction with a Duchess. In the story, Oliver struggles with the Duchess over social power, where she has the ability to cheat him by selling him fake pearls in exchange for a weekend spent with her daughter whom he is in love with – a classic battle of the sexes. While the conflict between man and woman is evident, Virginia Woolf uses flashback, point of view and imagery to also convey the dispute between the rich and the poor....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Virginia Woolf] 604 words
(1.7 pages)
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Mrs. Dolloway by Virignia Woolf - One of Virginia Woolf’s best-known novels, Mrs. Dalloway features a day in the life of Clarissa Dalloway, a fictional upper-class woman of the post-World War I English society. While most of the novel is primarily centered on Clarissa Dalloway and her preparations for a party that evening as her “offering to the society”, Virginia Woolf also uses the novel to comment on the consequences of World War I on its veterans. Through Septimus Smith, a character who is an ill World War I veteran and suffers from posttraumatic stress, Woolf critically comments on the detrimental effects of World War I....   [tags: veterans, hallucinations, war]
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605 words
(1.7 pages)
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Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway - Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway revolves around several of the issues that preoccupied the Bloomsbury writers and thinkers as a group. Issues of androgyny, class, madness, and mythology run throughout the novel. While that is hardly an exhaustive list, these notions seem to form the core of the structure of the novel. Woolf herself, when envisioning the project, sought to produce “a study of insanity and suicide, the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side.” This issue of madness, in particular, gives the novel its form as we follow the twinned lives of Septimus Warren Smith and Clarissa Dalloway....   [tags: Woolf] 624 words
(1.8 pages)
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Night and Day by Virginia Woolf - This scene takes place in Katherine Hilbery’s house. It is situated at the moment when neither Ralph nor Katharine were sure of what they felt for each other. In this extract, it is clearly seen that Ralph is lost in his thoughts mostly because of the different feelings he has for Katharine. He cannot make the difference between reality and what he believes is reality. Therefore, by proceeding to a deep analysis of what is happening in Ralph’s head, Virginia Woolf, being the omniscient narrator, shows us the trouble and lost Katharine Hilbery has created into Denham’s mind....   [tags: text analysis] 637 words
(1.8 pages)
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Use of Metaphor inThe Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf - The essay The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf, is a piece of literature that describes the physical struggle of a dying moth and also, an inner struggle that the writer is experiencing as well. Through these struggles that each of the characters in the story endures, the audience sees a connection through both subjects. Analyzing and describing this complex essay structure can be done by evaluating the meaning and metaphors used by the author to portray the message of the story, which will allow the audience to comprehend what the true meaning of the essay is and come to understand the lesson of the story....   [tags: Analysis The Death of the Moth] 639 words
(1.8 pages)
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Virginia Woolf: A Room of Her Own - Virginia Woolf, an original, thought-provoking feminist author, influenced women to fight for equality and to question the opportunities for women in literature. With her diaries, novels and poems, she stunned her readers with something they have not seen much before: women rebelling. Woolf was frustrated with women and the untouched and suppressed skills they harbor. She once said, “Women have sat indoors all these millions of years, so that by this time the very walls are permeated by their created force, which has, indeed, so overcharged the capacity of bricks and mortar that it must needs harness itself to pens and brushes and business and politics” (Feminist 595)....   [tags: thought provoking feminist author] 641 words
(1.8 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse – Role of Wife and Mother - To the Lighthouse – Role of Wife and Mother Woolf portrays the character of Mrs. Ramsay as a self sacrificing woman and mother as defined through her interactions with men: Charles Tansley, Mr. Carmichael, Paul, Mr. Bankes, Mr. Ramsay, and James. During Mrs. Ramsay's lifetime she is admired by most of these men, and is continually striving to be esteemed by all of them, at any sacrifice to herself. Although there is goodness in Mrs. Ramsay, not unselfishly given, there are also rising questions of this representation of mother by Woolf, primarily put forth through the characters of Lily and Mrs....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 645 words
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Humor and Tragedy in Virginia Woolf's Orlando - Virginia Woolfe's "Orlando" uses both humor and tragedy to observe humanity's often absurd and eccentric superficial constructions, both of class and gender. Woolfe creates the distinctions between male and female but continuously shatters them to reveal the illusions we create about gender. As George Meredith suggests, comedy is created when "The comic poet dares to show us men and women coming to this mutual likeness" (15). Woolfe, however, goes beyond simply bringing men and women together as equals; she blends them together as one androgynous individual, the effect of which causes us to laugh at the artificial way in which society attempts to define gender....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays] 652 words
(1.9 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - ... The books “had been written in the red light of emotion,” she says, “and not in the white light of truth” (33), meaning that the men Beton speaks of are responding to something—some feeling or condition that they, as a sex identifying with one another, are sensing, rather than merely expressing a natural fact as their rhetoric seems to suggest. If this is true, what reason do they have for being so critical. Men are obviously the rulers of society—the ones who establish societal norms and determine the hierarchy of humankind, as well as how their female counterpart fit into that hierarchy....   [tags: anger at societal change]
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655 words
(1.9 pages)
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Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf For this book talk, I read an Edward Albee's play, "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf." I saw the movie version of this book, which I found excellent, so it inspired me to read the book. The book begins when George, who is an associate professor of a New England college, and Martha, who is the daughter of the college professor comes home after a faculty party. Although it is well after midnight and they are heavily drunk, Martha invites another couple, Nick who is a new and young professor in the college, and his wife Honey....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf Essays] 665 words
(1.9 pages)
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To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf - To The Lighthouse published in 1927, by Virginia Woolf. Set directly before and after World War I, the story follows the lives of a small group of people, (specifically Mr. Ramsay, Mrs. Ramsay, and Lily Briscoe) as they navigate through their daily lives each facing and striving to overcome their individual conflicts while in the Isle of Skye, of the Hebrides (a group of islands west of Scotland) on vacation. But before I go more in depth regarding this group of people and their struggles, I will first provide some context (plus my presentation wasn’t long enough)....   [tags: brief biography, struggles] 667 words
(1.9 pages)
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Same Theme, Different Development in of Virginia Woolf and Alice Walker’s The Legacy and Everyday Use - ... In the diaries, there are many implicit recognition which can be the key of the fractured relations of the main character. The heritage later became extremely valuable because it can open up another character’s mind also able to change the reader’s perception about a heritage. Virgina Woolf, through her work The Legacy is able to provide the new thinking of the importance of heritage combined with human relationships. Different from Woolf, Alice Walker has her own way in explaining her thoughts on the heritage by blending the heritage theme with “everyday use”....   [tags: heritage, relationships, tradition]
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678 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Two-Dimensional Character of Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - To the Lighthouse                   The Two-Dimensional Character  In the novel, To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf illustrates the character of Mr. Ramsay, a husband and father of eight children.  As a husband, he degrades and mentally abuses his wife, Mrs. Ramsay, and as a father, he disparages and psychologically injures his children.  Yet, Mr. Ramsay has another side -- a second dimension.  He carries the traits of a very compassionate and loving husband and a securing and nurturing father....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 693 words
(2 pages)
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Description of eclipse in "The Eclipse" by "Virginia Woolf" - Description of eclipse in "The Eclipse" by "Virginia Woolf" Virginia Woolf, English novelist, essayist, and critic has beautifully portrayed the natural phenomenon of eclipse. She has also enlightened the importance of the sun. She has narrated the essay dramatically and has regarded sun as an actor that was going to come on the stage to perform as if a drama was going on. The sky served as a stage. She has made the scene vivid and ravishing by the usage of colors, images and similes....   [tags: essays research papers] 695 words
(2 pages)
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Analysis of Virginia Woolf´s Shakespeare´s Sister - ... Large numbers of potential artists are born, but most of these individuals have no opportunity to develop their skills. The quality of artistic achievement is extremely sensitive to initial condition, such a favorable environment and education. The most renowned artists arise in a thriving artistic climate. Artists simply cannot succeed in a hostile cultural environment. Virginia Woolf, in her essay Shakespeare’s Sister, believed that women artists would not succeed until they had money and a room of one’s own (Jacobus 700)....   [tags: artist, women, gender, domestic] 702 words
(2 pages)
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Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - Portrait of a Real Woman - To The Lighthouse - Portrait of a Real Woman Until To The Lighthouse, I had never read anything that so perfectly described women: wives, mothers, daughters and artists. I felt like shouting "Eureka!" on every page. These were my thoughts, beautifully written. Virginia Woolf writes of the essential loneliness and aloneness of human beings. In the first passage I am examining Mrs. Ramsay is the heart of the group gathered around the dinner table. It is because of her that they are assembled....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 720 words
(2.1 pages)
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Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and Virginia Woolf - Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and Virginia Woolf       I chose to compare and contrast two women authors from different literary time periods.  Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861) as a representative of the Victorian age (1832-1901) and Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) as the spokeswoman for the Modernist (1914-1939) mindset.  Being women in historical time periods that did not embrace the talents and gifts of women; they share many of the same issues and themes throughout their works - however, it is the age in which they wrote that shaped their expressions of these themes.  Although they lived only decades apart their worlds were remarkably different - their voices were muted or ampl...   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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723 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Death of the Moth, by Virginia Woolf - The battle against death, while can be portrayed as magnificent, is ultimately pathetic and insignificant. Like a boulder tipping precariously off a cliff, one can exhibit the ardent desire to survive, yet against the fragility and impermanence of life, this desire is a pitiful effort in the face of impending failure. The hopelessness of such a situation is depicted in “The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf, in which the moth incessantly endeavors to overcome the irresolvable dilemma of breaking through the barriers that contain it and visit the outside world....   [tags: The Death of the Moth, Virginia Woolf] 725 words
(2.1 pages)
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Flaws in the American Dream in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and The Death of a Salesman - ... Meanwhile Honey realizes that she is in fact not pregnant and it was all a result of hysteria. Martha seduces Nick, while George reads his book in a calm manner, however the when Martha and Nick head upstairs, George violently discards the book and declares the child dead. In the last act Martha has a soliloquy about their relationship, calling the guests to the living room afterwards. George rings a bell and arrives with a bouquet of snapdragons, which according to George, are "Flores para los muertos" meaning flowers for the dead in English....   [tags: success, struggle, deception]
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733 words
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway In Jacob's Room, the novel preceding Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf works with many of the same themes she later expands upon in Mrs. Dalloway. To Mrs. Dalloway, she added the theme of insanity. As Woolf stated, "I adumbrate here a study of insanity and suicide; the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side." However, even the theme that would lead Woolf to create a double for Clarissa Dalloway can be viewed as a progression of other similar ideas cultivated in Jacob's Room....   [tags: Novel Analysis Dalloway Woolf] 737 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf - The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf "The Death of the Moth," written by Virginia Woolf, explains the brief life of a moth corresponding with the true nature of life and death. In this essay, Woolf puts the moth in a role that represents life. Woolf makes comparisons of the life outside to the life of the moth. The theme is the mystery of death and the correspondence of the life of the moth with the true nature of life. The images created by Woolf are presented that appeal to the eye. For instance, the moth's body during the death is appealing to the eye....   [tags: Papers] 747 words
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Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. Power Struggles are very common is many marriages. In Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, by Edward Albee, the relationship or marriage between George and Martha is based in power. The power struggle between George and Martha has become the basis of their relationship. Their love has turned into hate. The only connection they have is through their insults and the series of games they play. The power struggle between George and Martha develops is reveled and is resolved through out the play....   [tags: World Literature] 751 words
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Parallels to the Author in To The Lighthouse, by Virginina Woolf - Virginia Woolf's 'To the Lighthouse' is a fine example of modernist literature, like her fellow modernist writers James Joyce and D.H Lawrence. This novel in particular is of the most autobiographical. The similarities between the story and Woolf's own life are not accidental. The lighthouse, situations and deaths within the novel are all parallel to Woolf's childhood, she wrote in her diary 'I used to think of [father] & mother daily; but writing The Lighthouse, laid them in my mind ….(I believe this to be true – that I was obsessed by them both, unheathily; & writing of them was a necessary act)....   [tags: Modernist Literature] 759 words
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The Death of the Moth by Virginia Woolf - ‘The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf      Death is a difficult subject for anyone to speak of, although it is a part of everyday life. In Virginia Woolf’s “The Death of the Moth”, she writes about a moth flying about a windowpane, its world constrained by the boundaries of the wood holding the glass. The moth flew, first from one side, to the other, and then back as the rest of life continued ignorant of its movements. At first indifferent, Woolf was eventually moved to pity the moth. This story shows that life is as strange and familiar as death to us all....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Death Moth Essays]
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760 words
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The Outsider in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - The Outsider in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own In A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf writes: "I had no wish to enter had I the right, and this time the verger might have stopped me, demanding perhaps my baptismal certificate, or a letter if introduction from the dean"(8). This particular line jumps out at me for several reasons. First off, I find it rather humorous. I was rather surprised by this remark as well. I did not think that I would be reading anything that would make me laugh even the slightest bit....   [tags: Virginia Woolf A Room of One's Own]
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761 words
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Styles Used in Orlando by Virginia Woolf and One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez - ... The creation of a fictional community was also depicted by Marquez in his book, One Hundred Years of Solitude when the Buendia family’s forefather, Jose Arcadio Buendia sleeps and dreams of a place where he and his family could go and live a good life. Upon waking up, he found a place along the riverbank and called it Macondo that was a fictional perfect community. In the early 19th century, Woolf wrote the book and this work put the female gender into the lime light, tackling the gender issues and the woman inferiority to man....   [tags: gender change, spanish society] 771 words
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Psychiatric Evaluation and Diagnosis of Virginia Woolf - I have chosen to write about Virginia Woolf, a British novelist who wrote A Room of One’s Own, To the Lighthouse and Orlando, to name a few of her pieces of work. Virginia Woolf was my first introduction to feminist type books. I chose Woolf because she is a fantastic writer and one of my favorites as well. Her unique style of writing, which came to be known as stream-of-consciousness, was influenced by the symptoms she experienced through her bipolar disorder. Many people have heard the word "bipolar," but do not realize its full implications....   [tags: Bipolar Disorder]
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773 words
(2.2 pages)
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Mrs. Dalloway By Virginia Wool - In Virginia Woolf’s book, Mrs. Dalloway, Clarissa Dalloway and Septimus Warren Smith grow up under the same social institutions although social classes are drawn upon wealth; it can be conceived that two people may have very similar opinions of the society that created them. The English society which Woolf presents individuals that are uncannily similar. Clarissa and Septimus share the quality of expressing through actions, not words. Through these basic beliefs and idiosyncrasies, both characters mimic each other through their actions and thoughts, even though they never meet....   [tags: essays research papers] 783 words
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Character of Mr. Ramsay in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - The Character of Mr. Ramsay in To The Lighthouse       When reading novels, it is important to understand the aspects of each character to completely get the message that the author is trying to send to the reader.  In the novel, To The Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf illustrates the character, Mr. Ramsay as a husband and a father of eight.  As a husband, he mentally abuses his wife, Mrs. Ramsay, and as a father, Mr. Ramsay discourages and psychologically abuses his children to an extent that makes his children hate him.  Mr....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays]
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793 words
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Importance of Brackets in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - Importance of Brackets in To The Lighthouse [Here Mr. Carmichael, who was reading Virgil, blew out his candle. It was midnight.] [Mr. Ramsay, stumbling along a passage one dark morning, stretched his arms out, but Mrs. Ramsay having died rather suddenly the night before, his arms, though stretched out, remained empty.] [Prue Ramsay died that summer in some illness connected with childbirth, which was indeed a tragedy, people said, everything, they said, had promised so well.] [A shell exploded....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 798 words
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The Phantoms of Society in Virginia Woolf´s Progessions for Women - Human beings find the expected so comforting. People want to be prepared for any catastrophe and keep chaos in the world under control, but this strategy is flawed. In the conquest for control, humans have created an ideal of how life should be, and phantoms are formed from this ideal. Doris Lessing’s “To Room Nineteen” and Under Milk Wood by Dylan Thomas are both examples of how different people live with ambiguity. However, Virginia Woolf’s “Professions for Women” most clearly explains how society’s ideals affect its members....   [tags: ideals, society, ambiguity, control, expected] 814 words
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Evening Over Sussex: Reflections in a Motor Car by Virgina Woolf - ... The threshold that Woolf is crossing in her essay is her perception towards life and death and its significance towards the human experience, as she is using the justification that death is meaningful in our lives. Towards human perception, what Woolf is saying is that common patterns and daily routines, such as “Eggs and bacon...and then to bed,” suggests the continuation of emotion and thought that give rise to new meanings of the world, as well as the combination of multiple human experiences that allow us to better gain a new perspective of the world that allow her to understand the “beauty, death of the individual; and the future.” By combining multiple human experiences, the narra...   [tags: story analysis] 825 words
(2.4 pages)
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A Room Of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf - Throughout history, women writers used pen names and pseudonyms to avoid the eyes of the patriarchal society. The female writers were no strangers to harsh criticism from the gender-biased readers regarding their artistic works. However such emphasis on gender discrimination coined the words, feminism and sexism, which now reflect on the past and the present conflicts. In the book A Room Of One’s Own, Virginia Woolf tracks down the history of women and fiction to find the answer. She argues, “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction”....   [tags: A Room Of One’s Own] 835 words
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Rhetorical Analysis on Virginia Woolf´s Speech Professions for Women - ... “You are able, though not without great labour and effort, to pay the rent. You are earning your five hundred pounds a year. But this freedom is only a beginning—the room is your own, but it is still bare. It has to be furnished; it has to be decorated; it has to be shared.” In this, she not only speaks of the physical rooms itself that these women are finally able to afford due to their own efforts, but the “rooms” or empty spaces in these women’s identities and the difficult task that they face in confronting old traditions and perspectives so that they are able to reconcile their past with their view of their future....   [tags: society, desire, metaphor] 874 words
(2.5 pages)
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The Set of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? - The Set of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.         For a play as drastically depressing and oppressive as Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, the set needs to augment the mood as much as possible. Albee’s play calls for several props, and all of these have to be provided, but more than that, the set needs to look as real as possible, to show that these people are not vastly different from the rest of us. And because in that fact the true horror of the play resides the set is all-important. Luckily, the performance featured a realistic, intricate, close set....   [tags: Whos Afraid Virginia Woolf] 875 words
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"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" Articulates the Crises of Contemporary Western Civilization - Edward Albee's (1928) play Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf. (1961-62) exhibits concern with the crises of faith of contemporary western civilization. This thematic concern is rooted in two sources. First it establishes a link with the dramatists of the thirties such as Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953), Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) and Arthur Miller (1915-2005). These dramatists had in their plays critiqued America as it moved from "confidence to doubt." In a land of success they wrote obsessively of the unsuccessful....   [tags: American Literature] 880 words
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Division of Labor According to Gender in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own - Division of Labor According to Gender in Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf, in her treatise A Room of One's Own, identified a gendered division of labor. For her, men work in the market place and make the money while the women, the upper class women at least, attend to the social pleasantries and household management. While she lamented this state of affairs, she did not present, as Gilman did, a model for existence that would allow men and women to operate on the same level....   [tags: Room of One's Own Essays]
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Comparing Virginia Woolf and Emily Bronte - Comparing Virginia Woolf and Emily Bronte      Virginia Woolf and Emily Bronte possess striking similarities in their works.  Both works have inanimate objects as pivotal points of the story line.  For Bronte, Wuthering Heights itself plays a key role in the story.  The feel of the house changes as the characters are introduced to it.   Before Heathcliff, the Heights was a place of discipline but also love.  The children got on well with each other and though Nelly was not a member of the family she too played and ate with them.  When old Mr....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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A Woman Breaking out of Society and it’s Norms: Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - In Virginia Woolf’s “To the Lighthouse”, the struggle to secure and proclaim female freedom is constantly challenged by social normalcy. This clash between what the traditional female ideologies should be and those who challenge them, can be seen best in the character of Lily Brisco. She represents the rosy picture of a woman that ends up challenging social norms throughout the novel to effectively achieve a sense of freedom and individuality by the end. Woolf through out the novel shows Lily’s break from conventional female in multiply ways, from a comparison between her and Mrs.Ramsey, Lily’s own stream of consciousness, as well as her own painting....   [tags: Traditional Ideologies, Book Review]
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Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women and Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women - It is as if a window finally cracks open revealing the sun’s rays brightening with the truth that men and women experience different challenges. Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women has to face the music when applied to Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women. In Tannen’s essay the claim that “[t]here is no unmarked women” has trouble withstanding but manages to hold up Woolf’s position of the battle women fought against the traditional norm to the freedom they can possess. First and foremost, Tannen claims that all women are “unmarked” and that leaves the essay with room for doubt....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, Deborah Tannen]
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Queen Elizabeth I and Virginia Stephen-Woolf - There are two women from the near and distant past that have become strong female role models in recent years: Queen Elizabeth I and Virginia Woolf. These women were not without problems while growing up, though. Elizabeth’s mother was beheaded after being charged with treason when she was only three; she grew up viewing women as indispensable after her father had six wives; her family kept dying (mother, step mother, father, half brother, sister), and she was locked away by her sister Queen Mary in the Tower of London for a number of years....   [tags: Comparison Essay, Biographies] 914 words
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Virginia Woolf and Contemporary Feminism - Virginia Woolf (1882 – 1941), a prominent English writer and feminist, was considered one of the twentieth-century’s most remarkable modernist novelists. The well-known works of Virginia Woolf are often closely related to the development of feminist reproach. With that being said, she was a rather distinguished writer in relation to the modernist movement as well. Virginia Woolf certainly restructured the novel, experimenting with her flow of thoughts and imageries. Although, not always appearing to be the work of clear organization or even solid structure for that matter....   [tags: english writer, modernism, biography]
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Virginia Woolf: Just a Misunderstood Women - Virginia Woolf can be considered one of the most influential authors of her time, she has helped pave the way for the female gender for generations, and possibly generations to come. Using her feminist approach to get her voice heard, Virginia Woolf was able to get her point across in a powerful yet meaningful way. My research of Virginia Woolf involved looking at her life to determine why she turned out the way she did, and why she wrote the way she wrote. From her early childhood, Virginia Woolf had a rough upbringing....   [tags: feminism, gender, discrimination, literature, rape]
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Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. Edward Albee was an American playwright producer and director. He was born on March 12, 1928 probably in Virginia. He was adopted at an early age, which influenced him to write about characters that are different. His writings were characterized by realism; fidelity to life as perceived and experienced, and were considered to be absurd dramas. Albee, in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, portrays a primitive sex struggle between a middle aged couple; the relationship between George and Martha is acted out in a series of games in which one sex dominates the other through unapparent love, weapons that each have mastered, and the most hurtful insult,...   [tags: Edward Albee Afraid Virginia Woolf Essays] 956 words
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Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf - ... The clock further provides physical structure and unity in a post-World War I society, connecting characters of the past at specific moments in time. Through the use of flashbacks we can parallel characters of the past into the present moment, which supports Woolf’s intricate understanding of time as circular not merely linear. Wolf further guides the reader to see how time can provoke daunting effects of fear and anxiety upon one’s life, which is displayed through several characters, including the novels protagonist Clarissa Dalloway and World War I Veteran Septimus Smith....   [tags: story and character analysis] 972 words
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Analyzing Woolf´s View on Wealth and a Room of One´s Own is Necessary to Become a Good Writer - Virginia Woolf's inspiring work tries to take on many problems in regard to women's work. She takes into consideration comparisons between women's and men's privilleges. Man's greatest advantages over woman would be their chances and opportunities to succeed and the chance to express themselves. Woolf believes , that wealth and a room of one's own is necessary in order to attain intellectual freedom is incorrect and misleading as it does not take into consideration education, having a good self esteem, access to all resources, not having domestic hindrances....   [tags: women´s work, Virginia Woolf] 975 words
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World War I Veterans and Shell Shock in Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf’s novel, Mrs. Dalloway, addresses life during the interwar years and more specifically the impact of shell shock on World War I veterans. Septimus Warren Smith, a survivor of the war, suffers daily through the trauma he endured in the war. Woolf highlights societies lack of understanding when it comes to the condition plaguing so many soldier after the war through characters like Dr. Holmes and Sir William Bradshaw. This along with propaganda glorifying the war and instilling the notion of manliness and strength in those that fought led to great misconceptions on the societies ignorance on soldiers suffering from shell shock....   [tags: Social Class Divide, Mental Illness]
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf http://www.*.com/Reports/Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf. Edward Albee In Albee's play, he reveals the shallowness and meaninglessness of contemporary society, and exposes the falsity of "The American Dream". In doing this he refers to many different facets of society such as alcohol, social conventions, measures of success and corruption on a number of levels. Violence manifested in both language and action, reflect the frustration of the characters in not being able to live up to society's expectations....   [tags: Papers] 989 words
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The Importance of Birds in Virginia Woolf's The Waves - The Importance of Birds in Virginia Woolf's The Waves      To emphasize her viewpoint in The Waves, Woolf employs a distinctive style.  She interlocks the dramatic monologues of six characters at successive stages in their lives to tell her story; and prefaces each of the sections with a descriptive passage of sun and waves through a single day.  In these passages descriptions of the sun, the sea, the plants, and the birds make implicit comparisons with the characters' speeches.  The actions of the birds in the descriptive passages most strikingly parallel the developing consciousness of the characters, exemplified by Susan....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Waves Essays Papers]
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Comparing Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse and Kawabata's Snow Country - Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse and Kawabata's Snow Country       Virginia Woolf's claim that plot is banished in modern fiction is a misleading tenet of Modernism. The plot is not eliminated so much as mapped out onto a more local level, most obviously with the epic structural comparison in Ulysses. In To the Lighthouse, Woolf's strategy of indirect discourse borrows much from Impressionism in its exploration of the ways painting can freeze a moment and make it timeless. In Kawabata's Snow Country, the story of Yoko and her family and its relationship to the rest of the novel corresponds with an even more modern medium, film, and its superimposition of contradictory image....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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Individual and Society in Virginia Woolf's Novel "mrs Dalloway" - According to Viktors Ivbulis (1995: 23 - 29) in Modernist fiction a special attention is paid to an individual who degrades because of the pressure from the society and is therefore shown as a small part of the society being unable to do miracles. Moreover, the 20th century's fight for the power makes the rights of an individual be dependent on the rights of the society. This individual is not a personality anymore that was established in the 19th century literature. It is a simple person, who is depressed by the highly technological world and the demands of the society and is therefore lonesome and isolated....   [tags: European Literature] 1047 words
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Clothing and Gender in Virginia Woolf's Orlando - Clothing and Gender in Virginia Woolf's Orlando In her novel Orlando, Virginia Woolf tells the story of a man who one night mysteriously becomes a woman. By shrouding Orlando's actual gender change in a mysterious religious rite, we readers are pressured to not question the actual mechanics of the change but rather to focus on its consequences. In doing this, we are invited to answer one of the fundamental questions of our lives, a question that we so often ignore because it seems so very basic - what is a man....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Orlando Essays]
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Education and Virginia’s Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own - “Only the gold and silver flowed now, not from the coffers of the king, but from the purses of men who had made, say a fortune from industry, and returned, in their wills, a bounteous share of it to endow more chairs, more lectureships, more fellowships in the university where they had learnt their craft” (754). This is a quote from Virginia’s Woolf’s essay, “A Room of One’s Own”. Here she is making a point about universities and the funding that they received from men that had gone to school there....   [tags: A Room of One’s Own]
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The Death of a Moth by Virginia Woolf - ... Because Woolf has a psychological dilemma, there may be numerous people that attend her each and every day for a variety of reasons, such as to check up on her or supply her with something to eat. Flying speedily from corner to corner, Woolf watched as the moth shined through his enormous amount of liveliness. The moth had been nothing but life. As the moth flew around the window pane, it crashed into the window several times, clearly displaying the fact that it could not overcome this obstacle, and was in need of assistance....   [tags: struggles of her psychological issues] 1069 words
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Use of Stream of Consciousness by Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot - Stream of consciousness is a key technique used most famously by modernist writers T.S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf. The Oxford-English Dictionary defines consciousness as “Internal knowledge or conviction; the state or fact of being mentally conscious or aware of something.” The term “stream of consciousness” is what is going through an individual’s mind. There is always a conversation going on within a person’s mind, whether it is an internal debate or just a general observation. The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms defines stream of consciousness as “The continuous flow of sense-perceptions, thoughts, feelings and memories in the human mind.” To put in simpler terms, stream of consciousn...   [tags: psychology, william james, monologue]
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When Melody and Drama Collide: The Use of Melodramatic in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway - ... Melodramatic illustrates the gap between art, and what we aspire life to be, and what life really is like. The first instance of the use of melodramatic in the novel comes in the passage describing Septimus’s current helplessness. The passage says that “At last, with a melodramatic gesture which he assumed mechanically and with complete consciousness of its insincerity, he dropped his head on his hands. Now he had surrendered; now other people must help him. People must be sent for. He gave in,”; this is a perfect example of Septimus’s feelings throughout the novel (Woolf 65)....   [tags: emotions, london, bad actors] 1076 words
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Existence of Reality in Christopher Durang's Beyond Therapy and Edward Albee's Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf? - Existence of Reality in Christopher Durang's Beyond Therapy and Edward Albee's Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf. Growing up, I always assumed that my parents would grow old together. I fantasized about introducing my future children to their still-married grandparents and attending, if not personally planning, my parent’s fiftieth anniversary celebration. Although my parents fought and struggled with areas of perpetual disagreement, somehow things always worked out and in my naivety, I believed they always would....   [tags: Durang Albee Real Reality Woolf Beyond Essays] 1089 words
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf In recent times there has been a renewed interest in Virginia Woolf and her work, from the Broadway play, “Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” to the Academy award nominated film “The Hours” starring Nicole Kidman. This recent exposure, along with the fact that I have ancestors from England , has sparked my interest in this twentieth century British novelist. During the early part of the twentieth century, artists and writers saw the world in a new way. Famed British novelist Virginia Woolf was very sensitive to this change, for she felt that human relationships such as ones between a husband and wife of master and servant were shifting, due to all of the political, religious, a...   [tags: Novelists Authors Writers Essays]
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Feminism and Insanity in Virginia Woolf's Work - Feminism and Insanity in Virginia Woolf's Work The critical discussion revolving around the presence of mystical elements in Virginia Woolf's work is sparse. Yet it seems to revolve rather neatly around two poles. The first being a preoccupation with the notion of madness and insanity in Woolf's work and the second focuses on the political ramifications of mystical encounters. More specifically, Woolf's mysticism reflects on her feminist ideals and notions. Even though she ultimately associates Woolf's brand of mysticism with the 19th century Theosophists, she continually refers to the specific encounters in Woolf's work as "natural mysticism" (Kane 329)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Pagan Elements in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf - Pagan Elements in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf   "I am preoccupied with history" George observes in Act I (p. 50) of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. But his relationship with his wife, Martha, seems to lean almost towards anthropology. Pagan social and religious elements in Albee's work seem to clarify and enhance the basic themes of the play.             Pagan trappings adorn the whole structure of the play: the prevalence of alcohol, the "goddamn Saturday night orgies" (p....   [tags: Who's Afraid Virginia Woolf] 1119 words
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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway It is apparent throughout the Virgina Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway that the character development and complexity of the female characters of the story are concentrated on far more than their male counterparts. It is my feelings that the magnitude of this character development comes about because of the observations and feelings of the main character Mrs....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Dalloway] 1125 words
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Putting the "Mod" in Modern: Modernist Authors - Ezra Pound summed up modernism in three short words: “Make it new.” It is an imperative that his fellow writers applied to their own works, severing with the realists, whose concepts of narrative were less radical and more reader-friendly. Whether consciously or not, writers like James Joyce and Virginia Woolf applied Pound’s dictate by breaking with convention and applying a variety of innovative techniques. Two of the most telling methods are among those described by postmodernist writer John Barth, who noted “the radical disruption of linear flow of narrative” and “the frustration of conventional expectations concerning unity and coherence of plot and character” (278)....   [tags: James Joyce, Virginia Woolf]
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Virginia Woolf’s Contributions to Feminism and the Academic Study of Gender - Virginia Woolf’s Contributions to Feminism and the Academic Study of Gender Born in 1882, Virginia Stephens began writing as a young girl. In 1904, Woolf published her first article and went on to teach at Morley College (Hort). Throughout her lifetime, she suffered from depression. Woolf had a vivid imagination; however, suffered nervous breakdowns and spells of depression. In 1941, at the age of 59, Woolf committed suicide. My goal in this paper is to explore how Woolf’s childhood, adolescents, and marriage impacted her writing, in particular A Room of One’s Own, ultimately leading to her contributions to feminism and the academic study of gender....   [tags: biography, women's emancipation]
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Overview: To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf’s “ To the Lighthouse” tells a story of a family who goes to their summer house with a selected groups of friends. It highlights a series of familial problems, differences in traditional opposes to modernistic view of family as well as to highlight marriage and childhood experience as central theme. Mrs. Ramsey the protagonist travels throughout the novel even though she dies about midway of the novel’s action. She becomes the focal point which connects everyone in the summer house....   [tags: familial problems, james ramsey]
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Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse and Forster's Howards End - ... She helped the poor, she made clothes for her children, and she comforted her forlorn husband as best as she could. Woolf says, “So boasting of her capacity to surround and protect, there was scarcely a shell of herself left for her to know herself by; all was so lavished and spent” (41). Only by helping others does Mrs. Ramsay enjoy life. Her entire life as well as her perception and self-identity revolve around fulfilling what she believes are the needs of other people. On the other hand, Lily Briscoe says about herself, “there was her father; her home; even, had she dared to say it, her painting....”she liked to be alone; she liked to be herself; she was not made for that......   [tags: potential for personal growth, character analysis] 1146 words
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Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own: Women and Fiction - Many female writers see themselves as advocates for other creative females to help find their voice as a woman. Although this may be true, writer Virginia Woolf made her life mission to help women find their voice as a writer, no gender attached. She believed women had the creativity and power to write, not better than men, but as equals. Yet throughout history, women have been neglected in a sense, and Woolf attempted to find them. In her essay, A Room of One’s Own, she focuses on what is meant by connecting the terms, women and fiction....   [tags: Biography] 1151 words
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Women of Creativity in Virginia Woolf´s Shakespeare´s Sister and Alice Walker´s In Search of Our Mother´s Garden - ... This is not to suggest that its quality would not have been up to par, but she would not have been given a fair chance simply because she was a female. In her novel, Woolf also discusses chastity and how it was a major issue during the 19th century. Women were expected to be pure until they met their husbands, which were usually chosen for them, and made good housewives. However, women who attempted to get into media industries were usually taken advantage of. Woolf states, “No girl could have walked to London and stood at a stage door and forced her way into the presence of actor-managers without doing herself a violence and suffering an anguish which may have been irrational – for cha...   [tags: talent, artist, race, gifted, society] 1152 words
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Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf was a very powerful and imaginative writer. In a "Room of Ones Own" she takes her motivational views about women and fiction and weaves them into a story. Her story is set in a imaginary place where here audience can feel comfortable and open their minds to what she is saying. In this imaginary setting with imaginary people Woolf can live out and see the problems women faced in writing. Woolf also goes farther by breaking many of the rules of writing in her essay....   [tags: essays research papers] 1166 words
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