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Your search returned over 400 essays for "Canadian Culture"
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The Canadian Culture - Culture can be defined as the behaviours and belief characteristics of a particular social, ethnic, or age group. Every country has its own special way of life. Canada’s in particular can be considered unique because Canada is a cultural mosaic, which allows elements of many cultures to be integrated into one. Canada’s culture has many influences because the numerous people who immigrate here are encouraged to keep their culture. These immigrants also teach the people they meet when they move here about their own ways of life....   [tags: Canadian Culture, Canada,]
:: 6 Works Cited
913 words
(2.6 pages)
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Americanization and Canadian Culture - Americanization and Canadian Culture Gaëtan Tremblay is a professor at the University in Quebec in Montreal. As a concerned Quebecois, He wrote an article which discusses the Americanization of Canada, in particular Quebec. Tremblay seems to have a strong stand point about the future of Quebec. Using statistical and literary evidence, primary and secondary sources, he attempts to support his argument that Quebec is a victim of American cultural colonization. Tremblay fears that Canadian culture is going to disappear as a result of the Canadian-American Free Trade Agreement....   [tags: Canadian Culture Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1221 words
(3.5 pages)
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Is Canadian Culture Doomed to Become American? - Is Canadian Culture Doomed to Become American. As Alvin Toffler once said, “The wider any culture is spread, the thinner it gets”1. Such holds true for the American culture, which is not only a dominating factor in its own internal market and known domestically but also a dictating force in countries around the world on the global scale, and the first on their list – Canada. This issue of cultural imperialism is touched upon by Gaëtan Tremblay in his article, “Is Quebec Culture Doomed to Become American?” Although Tremblay talks about the American culture’s influence on Canada as a whole, his main concern in this article is Quebec, which is in a separate league than the rest of Canada due...   [tags: Canadian Culture Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1155 words
(3.3 pages)
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Canadian Culture - Canadian Culture Canada is one of two countries located in North America and is the second largest country in the world. It is situated just north of the United States and constitutes the northern part of the country, excluding Alaska. Over the years Canada's culture has been influenced by European culture and traditions, mainly that of the French and British. Canadian culture has also been influenced by the countries' first people, the Aboriginals, as well as the newer immigrated population (Wikipedia, 2007)....   [tags: Culture Anthropology Canada Canadian] 1472 words
(4.2 pages)
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Canadian Culture vs American Culture - Although Canada and the United States share the same continent, they are divided by their unique ideas and views. After WWI ,Canada broke its ties with Britain and new independent nation was born with a unique culture. This new culture developed through the Canadian citizens. As a Canadian citizen, Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie helped achieve autonomy from Britain and solidify national unity at home. Canadian inventor ,Fredrick Banting ,maintained his culture as Canadian and contributed to the world through his invention of insulin....   [tags: Culture ]
:: 7 Works Cited
1875 words
(5.4 pages)
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The American Influence in Canadian Popular Culture - Many people might have a diverse opinion on the extend of the American cultural influence on Canada, but the truth is, these two countries share a long common border, they use frequently the same language, they watch the same movies, listen to the same music and collaborate on other numerous levels, including economic and political activity. In this paper, I would like to show the extent of the influence on Canadian popular culture that comes from the United States. For my analysis I have chosen four segments of popular culture: television, printed media, music and films....   [tags: canadian film]
:: 26 Works Cited
1937 words
(5.5 pages)
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Saudi Arabian and Canadian Culture - ... An example is that the women there is not allowed to drive a car, they can only got delivered by a family member or a driver. This Law is being used because of the holy Mekka Al-mukarama as it’s called which is in Saudia, Mekka al Mukkarama is the muslims, gods house. so everyone who travel there have to show respect and if not they get consequences. A other part of their culture is that the mans there have to use white dresses, the young boys and some of the modern business man’s don’t use it every day....   [tags: gender roles, family relations] 859 words
(2.5 pages)
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Canadian Culture - Each and every one of the world's many nations is unique in its own way. No two nations are the same in terms of the way they live. Whether it is driving on the right or left side of the road, pronouncing words a certain way or using hand gestures to communicate different meanings, each nation of the world has something that allows it to stand out. This uniqueness can come from certain religions, cultural practices, geography, history or from a multitude of other reasons. Despite this, a unique nation usually gains its originality and identity from its people....   [tags: identity, immigration, Canada, aboriginals]
:: 11 Works Cited
1393 words
(4 pages)
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Canadian History - In Canadian history it is quite evident we are influenced heavily by the much stronger nations around us. Therefore our own content in Canada is sometimes overshadowed by other cultures, specifically with regards to the United States who have a big influence on our cultural industries. Pierre Trudeau expressed the feeling Canadians have with this co-existence, "Living next to you is in some ways like sleeping with an elephant. No matter how friendly or temperate the beast, one is affected by every twitch and grunt." Some may argue that Canada should not continue to develop regulations to protect its cultural industries....   [tags: Canadian Culture] 1961 words
(5.6 pages)
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Multiculturalism and the Canadian identity - Multiculturalism and the Canadian identity. Introduction What is Canada. What is a Canadian. Canada, to employ Voltaire's analogy, is nothing but “a few acres of snow.”. Of course, the philosopher spoke of New France, when he made that analogy. More recently, a former Prime Minister, Joe Clark, said that the country was nothing but a “community of communities”. Both these images have helped us, in one way or another, try to interpret what could define this country. On the other hand, a Canadian could be a beer, a hockey-playing beaver or even a canoe floating in a summer day's sunset....   [tags: Religious Symbol, Canadian Culture]
:: 22 Works Cited
2329 words
(6.7 pages)
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My Muslim Grandmother's Shock with Canadian Culture - ... Research claims, “Islam has determined that any sex-oriented pursuit of happiness and enjoyment in public is to be avoided” (Motahari 19). Therefore such actions will not get you a fine and deportation, but a death sentence. This punishment illustrates the major difference in each society, for example a simple ‘thumbs up’ hand gesture is considered to be a “middle finger” equivalent in Western countries. Every individual has different perspectives on what is right and wrong when it comes to PDA....   [tags: affection, religion, uncomfortable,]
:: 3 Works Cited
708 words
(2 pages)
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Communication Technology and Canadian Identity - Communication Technology and Canadian Identity Introduction We are in the middle of a global information revolution driven by the rise and convergence of information and communication technologies. The telecommunications sector is changing at warp speed, driven by technological innovation that results in new fragmenting and regionalizing entity. I will examine some of the many forms of cultural fragmentation that take place due to the structure of Canada’s mass media industry. First I will discuss in general basic information about the Internet being a very strong communication tool and then discuss communication technology in the Canadian context....   [tags: Canadian Culture Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1378 words
(3.9 pages)
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Trudeaumania: Role Culture Plays in Achieving Political Power - ... Trudeau's charisma is often credited as the key attribute behind Trudeaumania. Merriam- Webster defines charisma as "a personal magic of leadership arousing special popular loyalty or enthusiasm for a public figure such as a political leader" (n.d.). Said charisma provided Trudeau with a significant amount of standing with Canadians. In his book Fire and Ashes Michael Ignatieff defines standing as "a word from the law that means the right to have your day in court...a friend who has gone through a tough time has standing with us....   [tags: canadian culture, pride, hope, obama]
:: 8 Works Cited
1272 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Challenge of Maintaining Quebecois Culture - The Challenge of Maintaining Quebecois Culture At first glance through Tremblay's article, "Is Quebec Culture Doomed to Become American?" he proposes that the vulnerable and threatened Quebec province is in danger of a cultural invasion by our Big Brother the United States. He fails to directly answer the question "Is Quebec Culture Doomed to Become American?" According to the statistics presented Quebec is hardly in such a bad state. The data outlined in the article assessed the degree of American influence over Canadian and Quebecois cultural industry and the demand of Quebecois programming by the Francophone people, thus allowing the readers to make their own assumptions about the appa...   [tags: Canadian Culture Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1436 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Uncertain Future of Quebec Culture - The Uncertain Future of Quebec Culture Gaetan Tremblay, a professor of communications at the University of Quebec at Montreal and deputy manager of the Group of research on cultural industries and social computerization (GRICIS), is a leading researcher for public policies in the field of communications. Tremblay is an advocate of public policy that defends against cultural imperialism by countries such as the United States . In particular, Tremblay studies the effects of the media on culture in Canada especially in a province like Quebec which is distinct from the rest of English Canada....   [tags: Canadian Culture Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1406 words
(4 pages)
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Opposed to Quebec Separating from Canada- Quebec is an Integral Part of Canada - Canada is known for its diversity, defined by its multiculturalism. It is what it is BECAUSE of the two different societies living together as one country. Quebec is an integral part of Canada, just as Canada is inextricably tied to Quebec’s identity. Although there is a long history of tension between English Canadians and French Canadians, Quebec separating from Canada is NOT the answer as it would be detrimental to both Quebec and Canada. Instead peace can be reached in one unifying set of values....   [tags: Canadian Culture] 504 words
(1.4 pages)
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Canadian ad culture - Introduction The topic of discussion in this paper is advertising in Canada. It will argue that the Canadian advertising industry strives to protect themselves from competition in the United States. The paper will discuss how the Canadian advertising industry allots their money to different forms of media to ward off the United States competition. Tracing the history of advertising from the early 1960’s to the present day, will help to show why Canada concentrates on the television and radio portion of the media....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 1 Works Cited
2169 words
(6.2 pages)
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The Infraction of Treaty Six in the Creation of Residential Schools - Treaty 6 was created based on the needs of Indigenous people and the Canadian government. The treaty was discussed and negotiated between the Canadian government and members of the Indigenous tribes. The Indigenous people had different needs they wanted included in the treaty; these included agricultural supplies, government assistance, and schooling that would help the community evolve from hunting-gathering to one that could grow crops and ranch. They also wanted to help the younger generation gain understanding about the new society....   [tags: canadian, culture, schooling, supplies] 1700 words
(4.9 pages)
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The Legacy of Lester Pearson - Lester B. Pearson has made many accomplishments throughout his life. He was the representative from Canada in the United Nations. He was the prime minister of Canada through 1963-1968. During his time of being Prime Minister, and even before, he has impacted Canada quite strongly. He is a very significant man because of the way he established Canadian Identity culturally, socially and through global relationships. He was the man who introduced ways to change Canada in order to improve lives. Firstly, he constructing the base of canadian culture....   [tags: canadian culture, lester pearson]
:: 6 Works Cited
878 words
(2.5 pages)
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Canada's Victory in the Battle of Vimy Ridge - In the spring of 1917, the battle of Vimy Ridge took place. As the Germans occupied it, the British had fought long and hard, but had failed to capture it after many attempts. Their immediate solution was to order the Canadians to try and capture this valuable piece of land once and for all. Unlike the British, the Canadians had taken time to think up a plan, which would catch the Germans off guard. The plan suggested that the Canadians make a dummy hill of Vimy Ridge, so that they memorize every spot on the hill....   [tags: Canadian Culture, War] 918 words
(2.6 pages)
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Canada, Melting-Pot of the Twenty First Century - Canada, Melting-Pot of the Twenty First Century Every country in the world has its own cultural uniqueness. What makes Canada even more unique than other countries is the fact that it is a melting-pot of many other cultures. What happened when all these cultures came together and started having contact with each other is that each culture proved itself exclusive but somewhat compatible with the other cultures. That may have caused people of different ethnic groups not to bond in such successful ways; nevertheless there still exists a strong attachment between an individual and their roots....   [tags: Canadian Culture Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1102 words
(3.1 pages)
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The American Cultural Invasion of Canada - The American Cultural Invasion of Canada “ Canada 's national obsession seems to be its own identity.” For many years Canada has feared the increasing influence of its North American neighbors on its culture - the United States . It has become a matter of growing concern for the people of power and influence in Canada to maintain their separate cultural identity and to promote their own cultural norms. Gaetan Tremblay presents his views on this topic and does this from the perspective of a person living and working in Quebec....   [tags: Canadian Culture Essays] 1308 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Evolution Of Canada - The Evolution Of Canada Canada, independent nation in North America. A country rich in minerals and agriculture, it was settled by the French and English and became an independent Commonwealth country with a federal system of government, in which the provinces enjoy a large measure of autonomy. Land and Economy. The 2nd-largest country in the world (after the USSR), Canada occupies the N half of the North American continent, stretching E and W from the Atlantic to Pacific oceans, N from the 49th parallel to the North Pole, including all the islands in the Arctic Ocean from W of Greenland to Alaska....   [tags: Canadian Culture] 1616 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Americanization of Canada - “Former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau once compared liking next to the United States to sleeping with an elephant. He said, ‘You cannot help but be aware of its every movement.’”                     http://www.pbs.org/pioneerliving/segments/Americanization.htm The issue of American culture and its globalization has raised a lot of controversy. “The era of globalization” is becoming the preferred term to describe the current times. The term Americanization has been around for years. It was first used when the United States was being heavily immigrated into....   [tags: American Culture Canadian Culture]
:: 7 Works Cited
2772 words
(7.9 pages)
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Native Canadians - Throughout Canadian history, there has always been one group of people who have always been dealt the worst hand. The Native Canadians have been oppressed and forced into assimilation it the Canadian culture for hundreds of years. Through out time, Canada has changed the way they treat the natives. However, the Canadian Government has not been effective at improving the position of Native Canadians. Those who survived Canadian residential schools, lived on Native reserves or have been involved in any Native affairs issue is proof that Canada has not been improving the position of Native Canadians....   [tags: Canada, culture, canadian government ]
:: 12 Works Cited
1136 words
(3.2 pages)
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Identity and Culture - Every person, or group of people, has an identity and a culture. An ‘identity’ is the image that one project out into the rest of the world, and ‘culture’ is the image which one has of themselves. Countries are no exception; every country over their course of history has created an identity and culture for themselves. It has been said that the worst act one could perform on another would be to strip them of their identity, and deny them of their culture. This is why, in order for a country to become a great nation, their culture and identity must be formed so that it is able to strive....   [tags: Canadian Identity, Film Industry] 1466 words
(4.2 pages)
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Canadian National Identity: Native Canadians - ... These were two of the many restrictions the students had to face. Breaking one of the rules would mean being starved, humiliated, or emotionally and physically abused. To name the few, witnessing cultural practices would result to sticking needles in their tongues, or a beating with a leather whip. Many results after the schools' closing suggested that some children even experienced sexual abuse. The environment the kids spent their childhoods in was poor. Diseases spread from the unsanitary conditions and were given improper care....   [tags: aboriginal culture, languages] 850 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Canadian Government and Industrial Schools - ... The alcohol was used to help the feeling of guilt for the parents. Secondly, the aboriginal children were treated as slaves; they had no identity. “Upon arriving at residential school, some children were given severe haircuts and issued with numbers that used to identify them” (Course Package). The aboriginal children were not treated fairly. Last but not least, the federal government threatened the aboriginal children not to speak in native language or else they would be pinned with a needle in their tongue....   [tags: aboriginal children, culture, identity] 832 words
(2.4 pages)
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Louis St. Laurent: A Politician in Canadian History - Canadian history consists of many memorable moments, including many great leaders that helped Canada become what it is today, like the well-known Louis St. Laurent. He was born on Feb. 1st, 1882 in Compton, Quebec, and died on July 25, 1973 in Quebec City (Coucil, 13). Louis St. Laurent was raised in a mixed family, with a French - speaking father, and English - speaking Irish mother, and was fluently bilingual. He studied many years in law, where he graduated from law school, at Laval University in 1914, and had been a successful corporation lawyer (“St-Stephen, St....   [tags: Canadian History] 1448 words
(4.1 pages)
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Canadian Modern Dance: Anna Wyman Dance Theatre - Introduction It is surprising for an individual to meet a famous person in the neighborhood or in a vacation resort, but how much more surprising it is for a person to get a job with a notable individual. I was shocked when as a new immigrant I got a job at The Anna Wyman School of Dance Arts and I was privileged to work with a Canadian choreographer, dancer and the Artistic Director, Anna Wyman. Through my work with her, I was able to explore the history of Canadian modern dance and to learn about my employer’s significant offerings to it....   [tags: immigrant culture, california]
:: 2 Works Cited
1035 words
(3 pages)
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Sexual Harassment among Canadian Women, Black and White - ... Textual harassment through the social networking media such as Facebook and e-mail, contribute to abuse in relationships. From one of the cases narrated in the text, a father of a sexual harassment victim, Cuccia, says that the freedom and private nature of texting causes more harm than good. This is so important to study because in this new technology age, teenagers are able to secretly keep their pains, feelings and emotions away from people who could advice them about their relationship issues....   [tags: rape, rape culture]
:: 2 Works Cited
989 words
(2.8 pages)
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Inuit Culture over Time - The Inuit people of Nunavik in Quebec province in Canada had lived in the harsh environment of the arctic for thousands of years with little contact from the outside world, but the Europeans have changed that, and the Inuit people have had to adapt to contact with other cultures and new technology. In the beginning of the Inuit Culture, the people had to be extremely resourceful in order to help the cope with the harsh environment of the Arctic, but when the Europeans arrived they made environmental changes and they also forced cultural changes upon the Inuit people....   [tags: canada, canadian] 1227 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Canadian Shield - In the period between 1760 and confederation, settlement in Lower and Upper Canada pushed into the Canadian Shield. In Lower Canada, settlement in the Shield was mostly by the Saguenay River, St. Maurice Valley and the area north of Montreal. In Upper Canada, settlement was attempted in the Ottawa-Huron Tract which was eastward from Lake Huron into the Ottawa Valley. Canadian colonial settlement shared a fluctuating relationship with the Canadian Shield. The Shield was a barrier to settlement until population increases pushed the boundaries....   [tags: Canadian History ]
:: 3 Works Cited
1470 words
(4.2 pages)
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Canadian Constitution Act of 1982 - I found myself thinking sociologically when I realized that equality in Canada is less practiced as what the Canadian Constitution Act of 1982 claims. In this constitution, it is stated that every individual should be treated equally regardless of their race, ethnicity, colour, religion, sex, age, and any disability; however, in reality, individuals experience inequality in the form of racism throughout the Canadian society. For instance, a few months ago, a black male was asked to leave the St....   [tags: Canadian Politics]
:: 6 Works Cited
2232 words
(6.4 pages)
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Historical Periods of Canadian History - Organizing a topic as diverse as Canadian history into periods is challenging. Canadian history spans hundreds of years, covers events from varying points of views, and contains dimensions of culture, theme, and politics. To understand how to organize history logically into periods, it is helpful to refer to Canadian history sources. Two history texts by Bumstead and Silver will be considered. The manner in which they organize Canadian history into logical and comprehensive periods will be taken into account....   [tags: Canadian History ]
:: 4 Works Cited
1753 words
(5 pages)
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Themes in Austin Clarke's short story Canadian Experience - "Oh, Canada, glorious and free!" these words from Canada's national anthem draw many immigrants to "the true North strong and free." Austin Clarke's short story "Canadian Experience," portrays the struggles of a Barbadian man who has moved to Toronto, Ontario Canada - against the wishes of his father - to find his fortune. Clarke does not name the principal character until closer to the end of the story. He has had to change who he is to make a meaningful life in Canada. George struggles with the fact that "he is ready for bigger things" but is finding it difficult to reach his goal....   [tags: Austin Clarke Canadian Experience] 624 words
(1.8 pages)
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Canadian History: Lester Bowles Pearson - ... Diefenbaker, the leader of the Conservative party insisted on incorporating the union jack, but the Liberals and NDP disagreed. This is what made Pearson such an important figure to Canadians—he didn’t stop or give up. Lester Pearson kept moving forward because he knew it would be for the better. Canadians were given a chance to show their own designs. Over 5,900 alternative designs were submitted (www.cbc.ca). A man by the name of George Stanley designed one with a leaf in the middle with red bars on either side....   [tags: canadian flag, commission on bilingualism] 953 words
(2.7 pages)
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Co-ethnic Canadian Employee-Employer Relationships - As currently understood, the primary and secondary sectors of the general labour market coexist within an immigrant-owned business sector in which immigrants work either as employees of co-ethnics or as entrepreneurs (Light, Sabagh, Bozorgmehr and Der-Martirosian, 1994). A recent study shows that about ten percent of all non-French and non-British immigrants, residing in Canada’s largest metropolitans, work at places where they share a common ethnic origin with most of their co-workers (Hou, 2009)....   [tags: canadian studies]
:: 22 Works Cited
2861 words
(8.2 pages)
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Crafting a Canadian Imagination: A Juxtaposition of Baseland and Hinterland Experiences - Crafting a Canadian Imagination: A Juxtaposition of Baseland and Hinterland Experiences Establishing a uniquely Canadian imagination has traditionally been regarded as a difficult task, as it hopes to craft a form of literature that places Canadian authors outside of the realm of influence of its early colonial European establishment, and more recent American convergence. However, it is possible to extrapolate an idiosyncratic identity that is not formed as a product of the difference between Canadian authors and their European or American powers, but rather through examining the ways in which these impacts have helped inform authors in creating literature which adheres to prevailing forms,...   [tags: Canadian literature, baseland poems] 1750 words
(5 pages)
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Alice Munro – A Master of Canadian Short Story - Introduction: All of us have read or heard many stories. They may be funny, sad, interesting or the other perceptions of man. The main elements of a short story consist of plot, characterisation, narrative technique, theme, tone, language, setting and atmosphere. The short story in Canada really developed in the late 19th century. Making a slow start in the 1830s, it picked up in the mid-nineteenth century when newspapers and magazines gave a fillip to its publication. A question often asked is what makes a short story specifically Canadian....   [tags: Canadian literature, female authors]
:: 3 Works Cited
3148 words
(9 pages)
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Canadian Restitution of Japanese Canadians - Canada’s restitution of Japanese Canadians for their internment is not sufficient for the pain and suffering experience The Canadian Charter of Human Rights and Freedom today are well known internationally for encouraging multiculturalism, protecting individual rights and being inclusive of immigrants and refugees from other countries. Unfortunately, Canadian policies were very different several decades ago as they had a surprising history of discrimination and racism, especially towards Japanese Canadians....   [tags: human rights, history, WWII]
:: 14 Works Cited
2153 words
(6.2 pages)
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A Vote for Canadian Content Regulations - In order for Canada to share an equal part in the overall media industry as any other country, Canadian content regulations must be in place. CanCon regulations should be enforced on Canadian media content, as it is a crucial aspect of national culture, representative of the country as a whole. Without such regulations determined by CanCon, Canadian society risks becoming lost within the commotion of international media and their varied interests. CanCon regulations not only help define Canada as a unity but help the creative Canadians that express themselves through musical expression....   [tags: media industry, canada, regulations]
:: 10 Works Cited
1314 words
(3.8 pages)
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Native North American Culture and Its Demise - A topic specifically examined in Chapter 4 in section 4.4 is the conflict between the European colonizers and the indigenous people of the lands they conquered. The conflict between the two vastly different groups is the notion of religion and culture. Europeans could not tolerate the practice of non-Christian religions in their newly conquered lands and began to oppress the ethnic groups and destroy the cultures of the conquered. Specifically, in North America many Native ethnic groups’ cultures were destroyed by British, French and Dutch colonizers....   [tags: religion, culture, groups, conflict] 565 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Second American Revolution": Expressions of Canadian Identity in News Coverage at the Outbreak of the United States Civil War - In this paper, I will discuss Brian Gabrial’s article, “The Second Revolution”: Expressions of Canadian Identity in News Coverage at the Outbreak of the United States Civil War. Gabrial’s article is about how the Canadian identity was challenged by the American Civil War. In particular, he argues that Canadian identity is significant in five important themes: the importance of British identity, antipathy toward Americanism and suspicion of American democracy, a well-grounded fear of American militarism, a patronizing sympathy for Americans in crisis and liberal and conservative political threads....   [tags: article analysis, canadian identity]
:: 1 Works Cited
1200 words
(3.4 pages)
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Canadian Literature: Untold Narratives - Canadian Literature: Untold Narratives The relationship between person versus nature is an ever present theme in Canadian literature. This relationship and its relevance to Canadian literature, is in some ways a form of cultural expression. Proof of this is shown in the fact that, “ many Canadians view the natural heritage of Canada as being a vital part of their identity and culture, on both personal and national levels, ( Freedman, Turner 170).” Additionally, Canadian author’s, “ [articulate] their feelings about nature through literary expression, and to thereby gain insight into their empathy for natural ecosystems and native species, and their concern about damage caused to those valu...   [tags: nature, Death by Landscape, Open Secrets]
:: 3 Works Cited
1691 words
(4.8 pages)
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Northern Canadian Health Policies - Introduction By examining the health policy and politics in Canada’s northern region from a historical perspective we see we see ever changing policies that reflect changing values. The determents of health are used as an analytical tool to tease out the failings of the intergovernmental approaches of the Canadian government towards First Nations and Inuit, in particular the Homelessness. The Homelessness is used for two reasons. The first being that Homelessness presents numerous health problems and the overcrowding associated may have contributed to the near problems of tuberculosis associated among First Nations and Inuit Communities....   [tags: homelessness, social determinants of health] 2775 words
(7.9 pages)
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The Canadian School System - ... It could include ceremonies and traditional stories. Or it could be had through formal instruction where members of the community gave children the knowledge, skill, and values to survive in the society. But then the Europeans arrived in North America and changed everything. Christian missionaries thought they had to save the souls of the Indians and deliver them to Christ. (Jaenen, 1986). One way of doing this was to remove the First Nations children from their parents’ home and place them in residential schools....   [tags: first nations, missionaires] 689 words
(2 pages)
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Canadian Aboriginals and HIV/AIDS - The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and its deriving acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are devastating conditions that currently affect approximately 35.3 million individuals globally (WHO, 2012). In the Canadian context, the prevalence of HIV/AIDS ascended to 71,300 cases in 2011, with 8.9% of the affected individuals being aboriginal peoples (PHAC, 2011). This number not only indicates an overrepresentation of the aboriginal population among the totality of HIV/AIDS cases in the country, but it also illustrates an elevated incidence of 17.3% from the numbers reported in 2008 (PHAC, 2011)....   [tags: canada, public health, virus]
:: 18 Works Cited
2596 words
(7.4 pages)
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Charles Marius Barbeau’s Ethnography and the Canadian Folklore - Charles Marius Barbeau’s Ethnography and the Canadian Folklore Born on 5 March 1883, in Sainte-Marie-de-Bauce, Charles Marius Barbeau is widely seen as the first Canadian educated anthropologist. He graduated from Université Laval in Québec, from his studies of law, in 1907; he never practised law. Upon graduating, Marius was awarded – as the first French-Canadian recipient – the Cecil Rhodes scholarship which allowed him to study at Oxford University where he was introduced to the emerging field of Anthropology....   [tags: Ethnography Canadian Folklore]
:: 20 Works Cited
3955 words
(11.3 pages)
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Canadian Drama - The representation of queer culture within Canadian literature, and more specifically theatre, can vary based on the multiple means that the playwright chooses to animate. In this instance, by differentiating French Canadian and Western Canadian queer theatre, we are able to analyze what drives each cultural representation. Montreal had experienced gay liberation in the mid 70’s, and theatre was empowered by such a movement to captivate audiences with the idea of a gay individual rather than a stereotype....   [tags: Theater ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1439 words
(4.1 pages)
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Canadian-Aboriginals - Aboriginal-Canadians have an excessive history of mistreatment and discrimination in Canada. Europeans considered Canada’s First Nations as savages, eventually residential schools were created which in extreme cases were comparable to Prisoner of War camps. According to Evelyn Kallen, “Substandard housing breeding disease and death, closed schools due to lack of teachers, heat, and/or running water are only two examples of continuing, dehumanizing life conditions on many reserves” (198). Although, extensive improvements have been made to reservations and Aboriginal rights, more improvement remains necessary....   [tags: Canadian History ]
:: 5 Works Cited
1986 words
(5.7 pages)
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Canadian Sports in Early Twentieth Century - Sports have always been important part of Canadian identity and culture. Since the rapid growth of both amateur and professional sports in the beginning of the previous century, sports like hockey, basketball and curling became inseparable part of Canadian culture. The two books under review examine Canadian sports in twentieth century and the changes it went through in early twentieth century are Bruce Kidd’s, The Struggle for Canadian Sport (University of Toronto Press, 1996) and Colin D. Howell’s, Blood, Sweat, and cheers: sport and the making of modern Canada (University of Toronto Press, 2001)....   [tags: amateurism, professionalism, christians]
:: 2 Works Cited
1555 words
(4.4 pages)
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Canadian Serial Killer: Robert Pickton - A society that presumes a norm of violence and celebrates aggression, whether in the subway, on the football field, or in the conduct of its business, cannot help making celebrities of the people who would destroy it. Unfortunately, such acts of rampage have become a prevalent factor in the Canadian culture. As a result of endless media coverage, Canadians now are constantly bombarded with numerous images of violence. Many of which often portray a victim avenging their opponent by means of force....   [tags: Violence, Canada, society, aggression] 749 words
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The Significance of Library and Archives Canada in Preserving Canadian History - Thesis The significance Library and Archives Canada is the preservation of Canadian history. Introduction Without the protection of Library and Archives Canada, Vital documentation of Canadian History Act could be lost. The significance of the Library and Archives of Canada is that it holds every important document this country was built on and more including Constitutional laws and all the past and current amendments made. Library and Archives Canada also contains the Census of Canadian citizens all the way back to 1871 in their database in addition to a military history....   [tags: Vital Documentation, Database]
:: 9 Works Cited
1415 words
(4 pages)
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Identity Crisis in Canadian Film - Identity Crisis in Canadian Film Much has been written about the ways in which Canada's state as a nation is, as Peter Harcourt writes, "described" and hence, "imagined" (Harcourt, "The Canadian Nation -- An Unfinished Text", 6) through the cultural products that it produces. Harcourt's terms are justifiably elusive. The familiar concept of "Canadian culture", and hence Canadian cinema, within critical terminology is essentially based on the principle that the ideology of a national identity, supposedly limited by such tangible parameters as lines on a map, emerges from a common geographical and mythological experience among its people....   [tags: Canada Movie Movies Films essays] 5804 words
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Canadian writing and the language of the colonizer - Canadian writing and the language of the colonizer During the latter part of the twentieth century, Canadian writers have looked at the effects of colonialism on the original native population. The culture of the indigenous peoples and the oral tradition used, was for a long time on the verge of being eradicated, as the enforced language of the colonizer became the accepted norm. As many contemporary authors believe that they have been marginalized, they argue that they are similar to the tribal inhabitants, becoming “...spectators, not elements in what goes on” (Weibe, Rudy....   [tags: Essays Papers] 703 words
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Examinations on the Dismantling of Canadian Multiculturalism in Rawi Hage's Cockroach - ... His exhibits disgust for these people, expressing hate (Hage 185), and yet his brief admission into their circle is indicative of his acceptance into a foreign culture by allowing himself to be fetishized, thereby fulfilling the role needed to join. Stealing from them afterwards is his rejection of this role, repelling him back into the spatial in-between of belonging and rejecting. By placing his character in this space, Hage demonstrates the opposition placed in front of his protagonist, and possibly other immigrants, by Canada and dismantling the notion of multiculturalism put on by Western society....   [tags: immigrant integration, story analysis]
:: 4 Works Cited
1325 words
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Systemic Problems and Leadership Short Falls in the Canadian Forces - Canada’s military leadership structure has gone through considerable changes since 1896 when changes to promote professionalism began. However, the Canadian Forces has done very little towards evolving since the exemplary leadership and professionalism shown during the Hundred Days War of World War 1. Instead Canada’s Armed Forces leadership has regressed into a state of systemic problems and lack of professionalism. Our armed forces are not reaching its potential as one of the world’s most professional because of educational flaws, politics and civilianization....   [tags: International Government ]
:: 5 Works Cited
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Canadian-American Relations - ... Considering the geographic position between Canada and America, in order to get across ones border there is only a need to cross land with a vehicle. Both of the countries are in the same continent (North America) and only require a simple transportation to transport and export goods. This helps with the Canadian economy because Canadians have more goods to offer to customers. Mass quantities of goods allow small businesses to open, it also allows more advertising. Some might say American advertising has a great influence in Canadian media....   [tags: economy, american companies, conflict]
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Nationalism in Quebec and Canadian Politics - During the twentieth century, Canada as a nation witnessed and endured several historical events that have had a deep and profound influence on Canadian politics. The most influential and constant force in twentieth century Canadian politics has been the increasing power and command of Quebec nationalism and the influence it has had on Canadian politics today. Quebec nationalism has shaped the structure and dynamics of Canadian federalism from a centralized to a decentralized form of federal government (Beland and Lecours 2010, 423)....   [tags: International Politics ]
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How Is The Internet Reshaping Culture - How is the Internet reshaping what we mean by culture. During the 20th century, electricity, the telephone, the automobile, and the airplane made the world more accessible to people and transforming our society in the process. Most people had to call their local bank to check their statements. Or wait for the paper invoice in the mail. The latest score for last night's hockey game were found in the local newspaper. Then came the accessible worldwide system of interconnected networks called the Internet....   [tags: Modern Culture] 1376 words
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Social Studies Rebellion Essay - Open protest, conflicting interests, lives changed forever. This is a rebellion. You’re willing to fight the authorities to be heard. Armed rebellion is only justifiable if nothing else works. The Rebellions of Upper and Lower Canada, Red River Rebellion, and Northwest Rebellion are all part of Canadian history. They show us that people can go against the government which usually results in a large loss of life, but more importantly change. The Rebellion of Upper and Lower Canada mainly occurred because of land issues, government inequality, and irresponsibility to the people....   [tags: Canadian History ] 882 words
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Historical Periods of Canadian History - Logically organizing a topic as diverse and wide-ranging as Canadian history into specific periods is complex and challenging. Canadian history spans hundreds of years, covers numerous events from varying points of views, and contains dimensions of culture, theme, and politics. To grasp the logical and appropriate organization of history into periods, it is helpful to refer to appropriate text sources. Two Canadian History texts, intended for use by undergraduates, by Bumstead and Silver will be considered....   [tags: canada]
:: 4 Works Cited
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Transitioning into the Canadian Workplace - Canada has a very diverse group of people, each of whom has studied competently and is a professional in a different skill based occupation. From the 2006 Canadian Census, about one in five Canadians were born outside the country (McMullen, 2009). Each of these immigrants originates from a distinctive culture and language, and have different characteristics such as gender, age, and education. Yet, it is not an easy process as it once was to immigrate to Canada (Dupuis, 2013). Upon arrival, immigrants face countless forms of barriers, such as: language, proper credentials, abandonment of education and work experience from abroad, discrimination, lower earnings and cultural differences....   [tags: mei fang, canada, immigrants]
:: 11 Works Cited
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Settlement in the Canadian Maritime Provinces - “New France was not merely the settlement of a few fur traders; it was also a colony of Christ in the New World, even more a colony of Christ, or of the Church, than of France.” Due to the pious believers that inhabited New France, the country was run in a particular way, separating itself from France. Although falling under the jurisdiction of “New France,” the Acadians governed separately than the rest of the country and were a separate entity within New France. Today, “the Acadians are the French speaking population of the Canadian Maritime provinces,” and these are the Acadians that were not displaced during the expulsions, under British rule....   [tags: New France, Acadians, Port Royal, Canada]
:: 11 Works Cited
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Settlement in the Canadian Maritime Provinces - Introduction “New France was not merely the settlement of a few fur traders.” The Acadians were “a pastoral-like people who once formed a proud nation in a land called Acadia.” Although falling under the jurisdiction of “New France,” the Acadians governed separately than the rest of the country and were an independent entity within New France. Today, “the Acadians are the French speaking population of the Canadian Maritime provinces,” and these are the Acadians that were not displaced during the expulsions, under British rule....   [tags: New France, Canada, Acadia, Acadians]
:: 14 Works Cited
2558 words
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Women in the Canadian Workforce - Women in the Canadian Workforce Introduction Women have experienced hardship in the Canadian markets since their initial entry in the labour force. Statistics and findings prove that the trends around women receiving less than equal pay and a lack of female leaders in the labour markets are in fact improving. While women and men are close to being equal in numbers in the workforce, there is still inequity financially. This issue of almost equal number of females to males in the labour market, but lack of actual equality in the labour force is significant and to be addressed....   [tags: pay, inequity, barriers] 1545 words
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The Canadian Food Guide - Introduction The Canadian Food Guide1 is an important health promotion tool, as long as it is adapted to the sociocultural context in which it is used. This is crucial for the First Nations, which are struggling with health problems related to nutrition and whose traditional eating habits must be taken into account2. Drawing deeply into their values and culture, Atikamekw health services have developed their own Food Guide (AFG) in 1998. For ten years, it was the main tool used by health workers to teach basic principles of healthy eating....   [tags: Health]
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Canadian Teenagers - today's society Canadian teenagers are exposed to different pathway involving drugs. The most common drug used among Canadian teenagers is alcohol followed by cannabis.(Leslie, Karen 2008) Canadian teenagers are influenced by drugs and alcohol on a daily based at school and through the media. In Canada the legal drinking age is nineteen in most provinces with the exception of Quebec where it is eighteen years old. Teenagers who have family members with drug and alcohol problem or if they suffer from depression, anxiety or other various forms of mental health disorders are at a higher risk of developing and addiction or experimenting with drugs and alcohol.( Leslie, Karen 2008) ....   [tags: Drugs and Alcohol, Cannabis, Marijuana] 1153 words
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Brief Canadian History - 1. As the government of Canada was taking its first steps as a united country after confederation it was eying a vast amount of land which is now part of the Canadian prairies and Manitoba. The Canadian government was interested in Rupert’s land because Canada wanted to expand from sea to sea (A Mari Usque Ad Mare) therefore accomplishing sir MacDonald vision for a bigger better Canada. One of the main reasons why Canada was eager to buy Rupert’s land was because good farmable land was scarce in Ontario....   [tags: Settlers, Rebels, Expansion] 1190 words
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The Importance of Atlantic Canada on Canadian Buisness - I wasn’t born in Atlantic Canada but Atlantic Canadian business certainly has had an impact on my life. My father has worked for McCain Foods for over 25 years and is currently employed as the Retail Area Sales Manager, Atlantic Canada for McCain Foods so it’s no coincidence that I was born in Kitchener Waterloo just forty minutes from Sobeys Ontario’s head office which was located in Brantford Ontario and my sister in St. John’s N.L. just two years later. I guess we moved a lot in those early years, if you call six moves in 14 years a lot, but McCain was growing and McCain always promoted from within wherever possible....   [tags: McCain, profit, success, detemination, economy]
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2040 words
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Canadian Supreme Court - In 1990, the Canadian Supreme Court exempted members of the Musqueam community from general fishing restrictions on cultural grounds. Choose either the “unequal impact argument” or “the cultural resources argument” and explain how it might be used to support the view that it was right to grant an exemption in this case. Evaluate the strength of the argument as it applies to the case. On the 25th May 1984 Musqueam Band Member Ron Sparrow was caught fishing in the traditional Indian Fraser river fishery, using a 45 fathom drift net in direct contravention of his band’s food fishing licence issued by the Canadian Department for Fisheries which stipulated that Musqueam band members could only us...   [tags: Fishing, Canada] 1089 words
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CanCon Regulations toward a Better Canada - Many scholars have a notion that children and teens are highly susceptible to being influenced by the media due to their lack of real world experiences (Scharrer, 1957). With such a high population of young people in Canada we must be aware of the content broadcasted through mass media to encourage a more “Canadian” youth. Canadian television, films, and radio alike are often compared to that of American media, which contains highly identifiably American substance. Thus, Canadian identity and culture is greatly influenced by content derived from the USA....   [tags: Canadian identity instead of Americanization]
:: 14 Works Cited
1316 words
(3.8 pages)
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Canadian Indigenous Population - ... It states that only the Crown could acquire lands from the First Nations and only by treaty (bctf.ca). It was a promise of respectful treatment toward Indigenous peoples and a commitment to deal honourably with First Nations in the future. In the years immediately following the Royal Proclamation, numerous treaties were signed with the Aboriginals to surrender small parcels of land in exchange for a lump sum of money, gifts and the creation of smaller reserve lands specifically for the Aboriginals....   [tags: aboriginals, European subordination] 1833 words
(5.2 pages)
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Were the needs of Quebecois Effectively Met? - From the Confederation of Canada, to present day, French Canadians have always thought that Canada's path towards the future should be embodied in a different manner. Several events in Canadian History have resulted in several heated feelings between French and English Canadians. Though the majority of English Speaking Canadians have tried to reconcile with French Canadians by making several attempts to mend their relationships, the question about the needs of French Canadians still exists. Through an extremely thorough analysis of several key sources, it is evident that the needs of French Canadians were, undoubtedly, not met, which shall be plainly and exhaustively proven through an in de...   [tags: French Canadian Nationalism]
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Residential Schools - Case Study: Residential Schools Examining the residential school system in Canada between the 1870s and 1996 exposes numerous human rights and civil liberties violations of individuals by the government. This case study involves both de jure discrimination and de facto discrimination experienced by Aboriginals based on their culture. The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms specifically protects Aboriginal rights under section 25 and section 15 declares that, “Every individual is equal before and under the law” (Sharpe & Roach, 2009, p....   [tags: Canadian Education, Canadian Government] 914 words
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The Changing Role of Governement in Canada - Our history of 20th century of Canada on the treatment on immigrants was indeed bias and still occurs to some extent today. Numerous amounts of immigrants were into lose if not all, but very many of their belongings, valuables and family behindhand, to posses a Canadian citizenship. People travelled extensive distances to seek better lives; Canadians faced many with racism because of their differences, in fact it influenced ruined many lives. Immigrants in the past were shamefully discriminated against and exploited by the Canadian changing role of government, producing a dark side to Canada’s history....   [tags: canadian immigration, chinese exclusion]
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1089 words
(3.1 pages)
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Foucault’s Biopolitics and Agamben’s State of Exception - The Canadian identity has changed through the years from the makeup of ethnicities, culture and values but all these changes are kept within a normative standard. The state has a stake in minimising conflict and diversity at the expense of the minority. Political writers theorise on the motive for government actions with the two primary theories being Foucault’s “biopolitics” and Agamben’s “state of exception”. Biopolitics stresses the importance of biology and how the government seeks to protect life rather than condemn, creating an effective and optimised population for capitalism....   [tags: Canadian politics, Canada]
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2800 words
(8 pages)
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The Charter of Rights and Freedoms - The Charter of Rights and Freedoms has fundamentally shaped Canadian society since its inception through the Constitution Act of 1982. Promising egalitarian, linguistic, religious as well as other basic rights, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is one of the primary doctrines in which Canadian law is founded upon. Many have argued that the advent of the Charter has transformed Canadian society into one that is preoccupied with that of rights. The rise in social movements, specifically in areas of women’s rights, indigenous rights and homosexual rights, are indicative of this....   [tags: canadian politics, constitution act ]
:: 3 Works Cited
1199 words
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Role of the Pharmacist in Understanding the Culture of Disability -  Collaboration among healthcare professionals between disciplines is becoming a focus of many medical educational institutions. The implementation of interprofessional programs require a multifaceted system of faculty coordinators and training, standardized assessments, clinical training sites, and administrative support. Nevertheless interprofessional education remains an essential component of the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation for improving health care education.1 As the role of pharmacist expands to different areas of healthcare it is important to ensure that pharmacy students are equipped with the tools to practice in diverse settings in order to collaborate with an array of ot...   [tags: Culture of Disability] 1100 words
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