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Satires of Education in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

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In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck is not educated, but through his adventures he proves himself to be more quick-witted by outsmarting the educated people throughout the novel. Huck was not raised in what you would consider a “proper home” and as a result of that he has a lack of education. Huck’s pap was the town drunk and for a short period of time, in paps absence, Huck was taken in by Widow Douglas as an attempt to civilize him. The Widow put Huck into school and shortly after his admission he was forced to leave school due to the returning of pap. Pap did not treat Huck in anyway like a father figure would treat his son, “I was all over welts.” (Twain 24) pap beat on Huck and locked him up whenever he went out just so that he knew he wouldn’t try and escape “He go to going away so much, too, and locking me in“ (Twain 24). Eventually, Huck grew tired of the abuse and staged his own murder. Huck escaped his pap, with the goal of reaching Cairo to freedom along the Mississippi River, not expecting all of the adventures he’d come across along the way. Through Huck’s adventures you will notice how his morality changes as a result of the people he meets along the way. The way that Twain satires education and the civilization of society in the forms of how they handle their problems, thievery, and drunkenness all lead up to unveiling how, despite Huck’s lack of education, his level of common sense is greater than that of an “educated” person and that Huck’s ideas of right and wrong have changed since the beginning of the novel.
Mark Twain starts the beginning of the novel by satirizing huck’s education with humor (Nyirubugara).“I had been to school most all the time, and could spell, and read, and write just a little, an...


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...rnt nothing else out of pap, I learnt that the best way to get along with his kind of people is to let them have their own way.” (Twain 126) The biggest events that resulted in the most growth in Huck were when the king and duke posed as the two brother and When the king turned Jim in.
The event where the king and duke posed as the two brother’s of Peter Wilk’s is when Huck started to realize the concept of right and wrong. Huck participated in the cons of the king and duke only to protect Jim but, once Huck developed a relationship with people he began to realize his faults in the situations. When Huck realized that him and Jim were becoming friends he was able to recognize that it was wrong of him to play mean tricks on his friends. Shortly after meeting Mary Jane Huck established a relationship with her because, she too did not like when slaves were mistreated.




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