Romanticism in Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights Essay

:: 6 Works Cited
Length: 1086 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Wuthering Heights is filled with different examples of the Romantic Movements. Heathcliff is an exceptionally difficult character to analyze because he displays numerous altered personalities. This raises the question: which Romantic Movement was most common in Wuthering Heights? An analysis of Wuthering Heights reveals the most common Romantic Movement in the text: Romanticism. Romanticism is based upon the ideas of subjectivity, inspiration and the primacy of the individual. Various examples of these from the text are when Heathcliff has Catherine’s grave excavated, the repeated possibility of supernatural beings, and the love from the past that is seen from Heathcliff and Catherine.
At one point in the text, readers picture Heathcliff’s excavation of Catherine’s grave. This scene is a vital extract in determining the most common Romantic Movement.
In the evening, I went to the churchyard. It blew bleak as winter—all round was solitary. I didn’t fear that her fool of a husband would wander up the glen so late; and no one else had business to bring them there. Being alone, and conscious two yards of loose earth was the sole barrier between us, I said to myself ‘I’ll have her in my arms again! (Brontë 297)
The scene above truly grasps the idea of Romanticism because Heathcliff is showing his emotions and individuality. His desire to be with Catherine is so powerful that he allows himself to disturb the peace and have enough space available for him to occupy after he has passed. This is very unusual because there are not any characters similar to Heathcliff in this text. This scene makes Heathcliff even more difficult to analyze but at the end we learn that the only thing he sincerely wanted throughout the text was to...

... middle of paper ...

... some point; how they reached that point was the true inspiration and splendor of this text.

Works Cited

Brontë, Emily. Wuthering Heights. Austin: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1921. Print.
"Introduction to Romanticism." University of Houston. Web. 13 Oct. 2011. .
Man, Paul De. The Rhetoric of Romanticism. New York: Columbia UP, 1984. Print.
Reynolds, Nicole. Building Romanticism: Literature and Architecture in Nineteenth-century Britain. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, 2010. Print.
Travers, Martin. An Introduction to Modern European Literature from Romanticism to Postmodernism. New York, NY: St. Martin's, 2010. Print.

Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

This essay is 100% guaranteed.

Title Length Color Rating  
Essay on Romanticism in Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights - Romanticism in Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights      Wuthering Heights, written by Emily Brontë, can be classified as a Romantic novel, because it contains many tenets of Romanticism. Romanticism was the initial literary reaction to changes in society caused by the industrial revolution:  it was an attempt to organize the chaos of the clash between the agrarian and the industrial ways of life. Romanticism was developing in a time in which all of society's rules, limits, and restraints on how each person should act where being questioned, tried, and twisted.  Wuthering Heights is a Romantic novel which uses a tale of hopeless love to describe the clash of two cultures-Ne...   [tags: Wuthering Heights Essays Emily Bronte]
:: 4 Works Cited
3286 words
(9.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights - Not a Romance Novel - Wuthering Heights - Not a Romance Novel Emily Brontë, author of Wuthering Heights, grew up in isolation on the desolate moors of Yorkshire, knowing very few people outside of her family. In the book, Brontë contradicts the typical form of writing at the time, the romance, and instead composed a subtle attack on romanticism by having no real heroes or villians, just perceivable characters, and an added bit of a Gothic sense to the whole thing. Brontë accomplishes this by presenting us with the anti-romantic personalities of Heathcliff and Edgar, main characters who are brutal and immoral monsters, who eventually die in the end....   [tags: Free Essay Writer] 484 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Violence and Cruelty in Wuthering Heights - "His violence and cruelty seemed too demonic for many readers..." Does the modern reader share this view of Heathcliff. Author of Wuthering Heights, Emily Brontë, was born in Thornton, Yorkshire on 30 July 1818. She was born the fifth of six children and died at the age of thirty from consumption. The Brontë children had a love for creating stories and small books, but it was sisters Charlotte, Emily and Anne who embarked on writing their own novels. They published their work under the names of Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell, not willing to declare themselves as female authors because of the sheer intensity of passion contained in their novels, which would not have been considered at all femin...   [tags: Emily Brontë Heathcliff Wuthering Heights] 1017 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Dysfunctional Family in Brontë’s Wuthering Heights Essay - The Dysfunctional Family in Brontë’s Wuthering Heights Creating a haven from the cruel outside world, families ideally provide protection and support for each of their members. In Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, however, bitterness grows between the Earnshaws and the Lintons. Within these two families, siblings rival for power and parents fail to fulfill their roles as caregivers. The intertwining relationships of the Earnshaws and the Lintons are marked by physical abuse, degradation, and emotional negligence....   [tags: Wuthering Heights Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
2389 words
(6.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights Essay examples - Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights 1. What techniques are used in the characterization of Heathcliff. Effects. Heathcliff is associated with evil and darkness from the beginning of the novel. "I felt his black eyes withdraw so suspiciously under their brows." (1) When Lockwood sees Heathcliff's garden (perhaps a symbol for Heathcliff) "the earth was hard with a black frost…the air made me shiver through every limb." (6) When we see Heathcliff when he is first brought into the E...   [tags: Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte] 981 words
(2.8 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte Essay - Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte In chapter nine, we are introduced to the issues surrounding different ideas of love through Catherine's dilemma. The author uses a variety of imagery and ideas to separate superficial love from true love. We are shown that her love for Edgar, a gentleman residing in the estate of Thrushcross Grange, is indeed superficial. Catherine tells Nelly that she has just accepted Edgar's proposal, yet she does not seem satisfied with her choice: "I accepted him, Nelly; be quick, and say whether I was wrong!" Say whether I should have done so - do!" This immediately implies that she is not confident of her own judgement - she seeks assurance and comfort that her ch...   [tags: Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte Essays] 1146 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights     Often in literature, the fictional written word mimics or mirrors the non-fictional actions of the time. These reflections may be social, historical, biographical, or a combination of these. Through setting, characters, and story line, an author can recreate in linear form on paper some of the abstract concepts and ideas from the world s/he is living in. In the case of Emily Bronte, her novel Wuthering Heights very closely mirrors her own life and the lives of her family members.   Bronte's own life emerges on the pages of this novel through the setting, characters, and story line of Wuthering Heights....   [tags: Wuthering Heights Essays Emily Bronte]
:: 2 Works Cited
1135 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights Essay - Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights 1) The story takes place in the early XIXth century. There are two characters in this extract : Mr Lockwood and Catherine Linton. Mr Lockwood is the first narrator of this novel, he was one of Mr Heathcliff's tenants. At the beginning of the story , there were three characters : Heathcliff, a foundling, his sister Catherine and his brother Hindley. Catherine fell in love with Heathcliff, but was married with Edgar Linton. So, the second character we meet here is Catherine Linton, Edgar Linton's daughter....   [tags: Emily Bronte Wuthering Heights Essays] 1376 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights Essay - Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights The female writer Emily Bronte wrote the novel 'Wuthering Heights' in 1847. Bronte's father had influenced Emily with his well-known poetry and imagination. Bronte's childhood could have also played a part in writing her novel as she used to live in the moors herself before her mother died. The North Yorkshire moors where 'Wuthering Heights' is set is a bleak, desolate and solitary place. The area was very inaccessible and it would have taken days to get to neighbouring small towns as the only method of transport was by horseback or by horse and cart....   [tags: Emily Bronte Wuthering Heights Essays] 2295 words
(6.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights Essay - Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights      In "Wuthering Heights," we see tragedies follow one by one, most of which are focused around Heathcliff, the antihero of the novel. After the troubled childhood Heathcliff goes through, he becomes embittered towards the world and loses interest in everything but Catherine Earnshaw –his childhood sweetheart whom he had instantly fallen in love with.—and revenge upon anyone who had tried to keep them apart. The novel begins with a few short introduction chapters which Bronte had most likely used to illustrate how incompetent the character of Lockwood was, and to foreshadow what was to come in later chapters....   [tags: Emily Bronte Wuthering Heights Essays] 891 words
(2.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]