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The Role of Fate in Greek History Essays

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The Greek believed strongly in knowing yourself, retributive justice and being able to see things as a whole. They also arranged their social life to provide them with a maximum degree of freedom; freedom form political and religious domination. Despite their strong beliefs in freedom , they always had the belief on fate and usually consult the gods regarding their fate, so that they may live according to their fate.

Fate is the inevitable force that controlled the lives of human. Before the birth of Oedipus, he was destined to "kill his father and mate with his mother". When it was prophesied “that fate would make him (Laius) meet his end through a son, a son of his and mine”, they “riveted his ankles together” and they had Oedipus, he was(p.g40, line 10-12) given to a servant to be killed in an attempt to prevent the prophecy from occurring. “And on that day your savior…”(p.g 56, line,6or 7) it was fate that drives the Corinth messenger to save Oedipus, preventing him from death without fulfilling his destiny. Fate also makes the drunkard to bawl out, “Aha! You’re not your fath...


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