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The Role of Education in Jeremy Finch's Life in To Kill a Mockingbird Essay example

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In the book To Kill a Mockingbird, education played a huge role, especially in Jeremy Finch’s life. Known as Jem, he learned many valuable life lessons that not many people today even know. Throughout the novel, he learns bravery, in many different case scenarios. He also learns about cultural divisions and prejudice, which happens to be based on education.

The most significant character development for Jem is bravery. This was mostly taught to him by his father, Atticus, when he tells Jem to read for Mrs. Dubose. Jem later found out Mrs. Dubose was struggling a morphine addiction, and was being very brave to beat it, although it caused her death. Atticus taught Jem that true bravery is “when you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what” (112). I think Jem realized the importance of what Atticus was saying and really understood what he was talking about, although at first he was mostly just upset.

Jem uses his newfound bravery in chapter 12, when he, along with Scout, or Jean Louise, and Dill intervene into what was going...


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