Preview
Preview

Rhetoric: The Declaration’s of Marxism Essay

:: 1 Works Cited
Length: 1824 words (5.2 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



The Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson between June 11th and 28th of 1776. This document was created to demonstrate a new concept of government, resonating the thirteen colonies’ reasons for separating from England and declaring war. Moreover, to dissolve the political relationship that America had with England’s laws. This document’s rhetoric was directed at King George the third. Jefferson constructs a philosophical statement that carries the peoples voice and appeals to his readers through fundamental beliefs. Lewis Masquerier adopted this philosophical statement in his document, Declaration of Independence of the Producing from the Non-Producing Class in 1844. The underling theme is almost the same, equality for men and the right to liberate one-self from oppression. However, Masquerier’s declaration has many similarities but at the same time many differences, such as the topic of social reform instead of political. Masquerier notices the importance of the original document 68 years later creating a historical difference in tone, style, and rhetoric. Non-the less, both documents utilize langue to influence the audience and call for a social reform established by concepts of Marxism using rhetoric.
Jefferson and Masquerier’s declaration both start with a philosophical statement; this statement is the first sentence within both rhetoric documents. Each philosophical statement delivers the point and the calls for a new social reform by declaring what to do when oppressed. Jefferson’s document starts, “When in the course of human events” (3), laying down the foundation of humanity as the topic and laying down the groundwork for his argument. In addition, by stating, “human events” the reader is persuaded...


... middle of paper ...


... format allows his and Masquerier’s rhetoric to have an impact to the audience. The styles of both documents are designed for an emotional response meant to impress with unusual word choice, and careful composition. The philosophical statement allows both narrators to deliver their fundamental beliefs, utilizing ethos, and appealing to the audience. By using rhetoric strategies Jefferson and Masquerier were allowed to implement ethos, pathos, and logos to sway the readers. Masquerier concepts of social reform based on the principals of equality with rhetoric. Moreover, being an advocate for the workingman allowed Masquerier to obtain the attention of many during the industrial age. This allowed him to expand on the concepts of rich oppressing the poor. However, none of this would have been possible without Jefferson’s format of his The Declaration of Independence.




Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay on The Nature of Rhetoric - Rhetoric is the art of effective speaking or writing, and persuasion. Most people use rhetoric numerous of times in their everyday life without their concern or knowing. In Plato’s Gorgias, Socrates discusses the nature and uses of rhetoric with Gorgias, while raising moral and philosophical perspective of rhetoric. Socrates believes that rhetoric is a kind of false knowledge whose purpose is to produce conviction, and not to educate people about the true extent of knowledge (Plato 15). On the other hand, Gorgias argues that the study of rhetoric is essential in any other professional fields, in order to provide an effective communication (Plato 19)....   [tags: Rhetoric Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1390 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Rhetoric in the Decleration of Independence Essay - Rhetoric in the Decleration of Independence Independence, to many that word means freedom, a fresh start, a place of salvation, free from the tyranny of kings. The Declaration of Independence gives power to the idea that such a nation could form and be successful. This powerful piece of political prose and rhetoric has held strong to these beliefs for years. The introduction consists of a single long sentence that subtlety directs readers toward a favorable view of America. It puts the revolution inside the "course of human events" making it an enormous thing and implying that it's theories are based on "the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God" raising it even higher to the powers of a '...   [tags: Papers] 538 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Speech Analysis: The Declaration of War on Japan - ... Roosevelt initiated his persuasion with his choice of emotionally charged words to ignite polarizing emotional appeals. He emphasized the deception involved the attack through the numerous repetitions of the word "deliberately" and "premeditated". Furthermore, his usage of the words "hostility", "dastardly", and "infamy" demonizes the Japanese people and entices the attention of his intended audience, both the Congress and all American citizens. His mention of the American casualties and infrastructure of the US navy during the Pearl Harbor attack united the nation under an ideology of patriotism and emphasized the urgency of the grave situation....   [tags: rhetoric eloquence, japan, war] 634 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
History of The Declaration of Independence Essay - The four main parts of the Declaration of Independence are: the Preamble, the Declaration of Natural Rights, List of Grievances, and Resolution of independence by the united States. The purpose of the Preamble was to kindly state that nature itself calls for separation of people from their country, and that in many times through out history, ties will be broken, and new ones shall be formed. The purpose of the Declaration of Natural Rights is to explain that people have certain inalienable rights which governments should protect....   [tags: The Declaration of Independence] 894 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Analysis of The Declaration of Independence Essay - What is the Declaration of Independence. The declaration of independence states that all individuals have inalienable rights, requiring life, liberty, and property, a document by which the thirteen colonies proclaimed their independence from Great Britain. If these rights are not protected, people have the right to abolish the government and institute a new one that is willing to secure those rights and their happiness. The declaration was written by Jefferson when he had the vision that America should be liberal....   [tags: the declaration, thomas jefferson, independence] 1241 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Marxism-Leninism: Three Parts - Economics mark complexity, innovation, and rehabilitation of a nation. The economy of a nation precedes the turning point towards enhancement or inferiority. “Marxism-Leninism, the communist philosophy of Vladimir Lenin, refines Karl Marx' philosophy with three parts. First, revolution must be violent to succeed; second, revolution is possible because of large peasant and laboring classes; and third, revolution must be controlled by a group of dedicated revolutionaries who will not sell out the revolution before it is completed”("Marxism-Leninism")....   [tags: Communism, Marxism, Lenin]
:: 13 Works Cited
1269 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The American Declaration of Independence Essay - On May 10 of 1775 the Second Continental Congress gathered in Philadelphia, one month after American s begain fighting with the British. There, delegates from each of the 13 colonies would decide on independence. A Declaration of Independence was required to state why the 13 colonies were separating from the British Empire. With this, POW's could demand to be treated as prisoners instead of traitors and aid coul d be sought from Britain's enemies. The Declaration of Independence consisted of the preamble, the middle section and a section declaring independence....   [tags: Declaration of Independence] 417 words
(1.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about The Visual Rhetoric of Traumatic Histories - The Visual Rhetoric of Traumatic Histories Among the problematics that guide my understanding of the possibility of visual rhetorics are three. Each might be considered to exists within/bring together the nexus of history, images, and power. This nexus helps to form a framework for an economy of verbal and visual images that, in turn, might become the fabric of a visual rhetorics. The first is what I want to call the "enigma of unrepresentability." The second is that images become especially important for us when they can be read as "self-reflexive." Finally, the third, is the "ideological privileging" of the visual that renders its apparatus, quite literally, hard to "see." Let me briefly...   [tags: Visual Rhetoric Essays] 1111 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Argument Analysis - Declaration of Independence Essays - Argument Analysis - Declaration of Independence In May of 1776 a resolution was passed at the Virginia Convention in Williamsburg that asked the thirteen American colonies to declare the United Colonies free and independent from the British crown. At the second continental congress the resolution passed and on June 11, 1776 a five-man committee led by Thomas Jefferson was established to write the Declaration of Independence. On July 4, 1776 the members of the second continental congress signed into existence one of the most influential documents in history....   [tags: Argument Analysis Declaration of Independence] 765 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay Response To Jefferson's Declaration Of Independence - The American Declaration of Independence has affected the foundation of the United States more than any other event or document in American history. The Declaration of Independence was the basis for what the country was established on. The document was a way for the colonists to emancipate themselves from the cruelty of King George. This document had such an impacting effect because it was such a new way of bringing up concerns. It was the first of its kind in the history of America in the aspect of liberation of a group of people....   [tags: Declaration Independence History American] 1755 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]