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Essay on Racial Struggles Throughout the History of American Society

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The Untied States of America was built on the exploitation of others and the expansion of foreign lands. Anglo-Saxon superiority and their successive impact on governing policies and strong domination throughout every social institution in the nation allowed discrimination to prevail. Scientific Racism reached new heights of justification towards slavery, the massive eradication of the Native people, colonialism and daily occurrences of unequal behaviors and treatments towards colored people. The strong presence of polygenesis helped spur along and justify racism; the idea that all non whites were groups of individuals who ultimately came from another type of species supporting the idea that Blacks, Natives and other colored people were not ‘real’ human beings. Traditions, legislation, domination and acceptance of such social norms allow racism to be principal whether it was apparent through slavery or hidden in new laws and policies to come. Every aspect of a colored person’s life was affected upon, Education, economic status, environmental location and political rights. Those who had the power within the court system followed the Anglo-Saxon ways, making any change difficult and time consuming to come across. The beginnings of colonialism, allowed Europeans to travel the world and meet different kinds of people. Their first encounter with the New World and these new peoples, created the opening ideas of inequality. These new people were called indigenous people and alien like. Europeans began to question if these people were really human and had the same intellectual capacity as Europeans did. “Alternative ideas about the origins and identities of indigenous peoples also began to appear early in the 16th century...


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...to the foundation of American Society. We continue to support and maintain these social norms through deliberated and non deliberated ways, forced servitude and the advancement of racial legislation fostered racism in the United States. The most intellectuals of their time, contemplated to the degree of what the New Worlds people were considered to be human. Some Europeans had hope for Natives and possible guidance, but it became evident, that profit and status were more viable entities than any sort of human decency or equality. As minorities began to unify and protest discrimination, legislation was built off of Anglo-Saxon domination and ideologies, only to continue to delay the growth of colored people. Laws like the Chinese Exclusion Act, Separate but Equal, and Jim Crow Laws are just a few examples of such legislation inflicted upon colored groups in America.


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