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Pros And Cons Of Standardized Testing Essays

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The United States recognizes that standardized testing is a central part of the educational system in our country. What many people do not know though is the history of where it came from. Beginning in the mid-1800’s prestigious universities decided they wanted to give more students across the country a better chance at going into higher education, but at the time there was not a way to measure the capabilities of students in both high class and low class families. This is how standardized testing came into play. If a student could do well on these tests regardless of their financial position than their scores would hopefully speak for themselves. Now standardized testing performs many more roles compared to its simple origins.

In today’s society standardized tests not only indicates the capabilities of the students, but they also show how much they have learned, and the results can even decide how much funding a school will receive. Due to these factors, a tremendous amount of pressure is put upon both students and teachers. For students the pressure is mainly to do well, and for teachers the pressure is primarily to teach your students well enough to perform their best. These requirements have become an integral part of what shapes the classroom mold. The goal of schooling is no longer to just teach, but is now also to prepare students for taking exams.

One argument that has become prevalent is the debate of whether or not standardized testing should be used at all. Ultimately this is a personal decision; there is no right or wrong answer considering that an argument could be made for either side. One thing that is for certain though is that there has to be some standard for determining a student’s abilities in school. Th...


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...Tests." ProCon.org Headlines. N.p., 1 Nov. 2014. Web. 30 Nov. 2014.

Tennant, Victoria. "School of Education at Johns Hopkins University-The Powerful Impact of Stress." School of Education at Johns Hopkins University. John Hopkinds School of Education, Sept. 2005. Web. 01 Dec. 2014.

"The Human Brain - Stress." The Human Brain - Stress. The Franklin Institute, 2004. Web. 29 Nov. 2014.

Tung, Stephen. "News." Stanford University. Stanford, 20 Jan. 2012. Web. 29 Nov. 2014.

"Where Did The Test Come From?" PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2014.


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