Preview
Preview

Essay about lieshod The Lies in Conrad's Heart of Darkness

No Works Cited
Length: 894 words (2.6 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



The Lies in Heart of Darkness

 

A lie, as defined by Webster's dictionary is 1) a false statement deliberately presented as true; 2) to convey a false image or impression. It is generally accepted that Marlow told a lie to the Intended - the reasons for that lie are debatable. I would suggest that he told not just one lie, to the Intended, but several - that his visit itself was, in a form, a lie.

 

The statement easily recognized as a lie, and that falls into Webster's definition 1), is Marlow's deliberate falsification of Kurtz's last words - "The last word he pronounced was - your name" (Longman p. 2246), when we all know that Kurtz's last words were, "The horror! The horror!"(Longman p. 2240). Marlow's intentions - however noble in this one instance - are questionable, in regards to the lesser lies he tells the Intended. This lie, in Marlow's mind, was justified as a means of protecting the Intended. Marlow saw Kurtz's death as "...a moment of triumph for the wildernes, an invading and vengeful rush, it seemed to me, I would have to keep back alone for the salvation of another soul"(Longman p. 2243). Now the lie is not only justified but honorable.

 

Marlow's more noble self - his spiritually attuned nature - tells us early on that, "You know I hate, detest and can't bear a lie, not because I am straighter than the rest of us, but simply because it appalls me. There is a taint of death, a flavour of mortality in lies - which is exactly what I hate and detest in the world - what I want to forget." (Longman p. 2210). His statement is recognition of the lies (of the world, in general and of the brick-maker, in particular) (Longman p. 2208-2210). He reviles these lies as a betrayal of what is good and...


... middle of paper ...


......"[Marlow]. To illustrate how effectively the previous lies are preparing Marlow - he didn't even choke on this one! Lie #7: "His end was in every way worthy of his life"[Marlow]. Taken at face value that may very well have been a true statement however, Marlow intended for it to carry the false impression of a noble, honorable and worthy death and life.

 

Marlow never elaborates on how the lie(s) made him feel. I believe Marlow's true character was honest and noble and suffered from this blow to his earlier righteous abhorrence. Possibly these lie(s) could be classified as irony (out of respect for Marlow's true character) - the use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning or an incongruity between what is expected and what actually occurs. Or is that the first step into the Heart of Darkness? Justifying sins based on intentions or results.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
lieshod White Lies in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness Essay - White Lies in Heart of Darkness        In his novella Heart of Darkness (1899), Joseph Conrad through his principal narrator, Marlow, reflects upon the evils of the human condition as he has experienced it in Africa and Europe. Seen from the perspective of Conrad's nameless, objective persona, the evils that Marlow encountered on the expedition to the "heart of darkness," Kurtz's Inner Station on the banks of the snake-like Congo River, fall into two categories: the petty misdemeanors and trivial lies that are common- place, and the greater evils -- the grotesque acts society attributes to madmen....   [tags: Heart Darkness essays]
:: 11 Works Cited
2842 words
(8.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on lieshod Marlow's Lie in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness - Marlow's Lie in Heart of Darkness      In Conrad's novel, Heart of Darkness, it is generally accepted that Marlow told a lie to the Intended - the reasons for that lie are debatable. Through his lie, Marlow gives Kurtz a type of forgiveness. In so doing, perhaps Marlow errs on the side of restraint, while upholding the belief that Faustian wisdom has little value.    One of the main themes of Faust is that knowledge can be demoralizing, and in the end, is better left alone. From the outset of the book, Marlow makes observations on the uselessness of civilized knowledge on the African native:   "He was an improved specimen; he could fire up a vertical boiler....   [tags: Heart Darkness essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1178 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
lieshod Marlow’s Lie in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness Essays - Marlow’s Lie in Heart of Darkness     Throughout the Heart of Darkness scenes, we get several glimpses of Marlow's particular attitudes towards women, that they are creatures that live "in a world of their own, and that there had never been anything like it, and never can be" (Longman, p. 2199). Women are able to create and see the beauty in life, something that is harder for men to do, roughened by hard work and misfortunes. Marlow also states, this time to his audience aboard the Nellie, "We must help them to stay in that beautiful world of their own, lest ours gets worse" (Longman, p....   [tags: Heart Darkness essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
613 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
An Analysis of Conrad's Heart of Darkness Essay - An Analysis of Conrad's Heart of Darkness In the twentieth century, nihilistic themes, such as moral degeneration, man's bestial instincts at the core of the soul, and cosmic purposelessness, have preoccupied many works of literature and philosophy....   [tags: Conrad Heart Darkness] 1464 words
(4.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad - The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad Marlow, an ordinary sailor with idealistic dreams, goes on a dark yet fascinating journey as a newly hired riverboat captain, traveling up the Congo River, seeking out the legendary chief of the Belgium trading company. When describing typical sites and events situated in the Congo, Joseph Conrad wrote "The Heart of Darkness" in a first person's view, with Marlow as the highlight character. As he writes on about Marlow's experiences, he portrays typical issues set in the time period of the late 1800's, such as slavery, trading and imperialism....   [tags: Joseph Conrad Heart Darkness] 1187 words
(3.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Theme of Darkness in Conrad's Heart of Darkness Essays - The Theme of Darkness in Conrad's Heart of Darkness Works Cited Not Included It has been said that although Conrad may not have been 'the greatest novelist, he was certainly the greatest artist every to write a novel';. I feel that this is an apt description of Conrad's writing style in Heart of Darkness (1902), as he paints many verbal pictures by using expressive words and many figurative descriptions of places and people. An extensive use of words relating to colour, is evident throughout the novella....   [tags: Heart Darkness Joseph Conrad Essays] 1326 words
(3.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness Essay - Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness" Joseph Conrad's novel "Heart of Darkness" written in 1902 is an overwhelming chronicle of Marlow's journey into the heart of the African continent. It is one of the most influential novels of the twentieth century. In this ghastly and horrific tale, Marlow leads an expedition up the Congo River, only to find everything is not as it seems. This haunting and mysterious story takes him into the unbearable core of the jungle. The novel also explores trade and exploration, imperialism and colonization....   [tags: Heart Darkness Joseph Conrad Essays] 755 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Joseph Conrad's The Women of Heart of Darkness - Joseph Conrad's The Women of Heart of Darkness      The novella Heart of Darkness illustrates readers with three different types of depictions that men had of women during the late 1800’s; also known as the imperialistic era. These depictions were as follows; the naive woman, the mistress, and the wealthy widow. The naïve woman was personified by Kurtz intended. The mistress was personified by the native African woman. The wealthy widow is personified by Marlow’s aunt. This assumption can be made on various levels....   [tags: Heart Darkness Conrad Essays] 690 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Role of Women in Conrad's Heart of Darkness Essay - Women do not play an important part in Heart of Darkness. This is not too surprising as the text was first published for a magazine in 1898. Throughout Marlow's voyage he encounters few women and he does not consider any of them to be his equal. His reference to women places them in their own little world where they should remain. There are a number of reasons as to why Marlow may have this understanding of the female being. These reasons include, but are not limited to, the lack of females in his life, the fact that he is primarily surrounded by men, and the type of women he comes in contact with in his line of work....   [tags: Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness] 876 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Colonialism and Imperialism in Conrad's Heart of Darkness Essay - Imperialism Exposed in Conrad's Heart of Darkness      Joseph Conrad's 'Heart of Darkness' is a novel about European imperialism and its far-reaching effects. Conrad relates his personal opinions through the protagonist, Marlow, who learns a great deal about imperialism while on a journey to the African Congo. Although 'Heart of Darkness' seems to be an anti-imperialistic work, this is not entirely true. Conrad condemns the overly idealistic nature of imperialism, but does not attack Britain's competent employment of it....   [tags: Heart Darkness essays papers Conrad]
:: 6 Works Cited
1005 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]