Preview
Preview

Man and Nature after the Fall in John Milton's Paradise Lost Essay

:: 4 Works Cited
Length: 1585 words (4.5 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Man and Nature after the Fall in Paradise Lost

 
     In Paradise Lost, the consequences of the fall and the change in relations between man and nature can best be discussed when we look at Milton's pre-fall descriptions of Eden and its inhabitants. Believing that fallen humans could never fully understand what life was like in Eden and the relationships purely innocent beings shared, Milton begins his depiction of Paradise and Adam and Eve through the fallen eyes of Satan:

 

So little knows

Any, but God alone, to value right

The good before him, but perverts best things

To worse abuse, or to thir meanest use.

Beneath him with new wonder now he views

To all delight of human sense expos'd

In narrow room Nature's whole wealth, yea more,

A Heaven on Earth: for blissful Paradise

Of God the Garden was, by him in the East

Of Eden planted... (IV, 201-210)

 

Milton presents a symbolic landscape, a garden that certainly was created by a divine power. Eden is fertile, and"All Trees of noblest kind for sight, smell taste" (IV, 217) grow in abundance blooming with fruit. There are, mountains, hills, groves, a river, and other earthly delights. Adam and Eve live in this paradise and their job is to tend to the garden: "They sat them down, and after no more toil/ Of thir sweet Gard'ning labor then suffic'd" (IV, 27-28).

 

Although Eden works harmoniously with Adam and Eve, allowing them to partake of its abundance, it also lives and thrives on its own. Eden has a mind and is a living being, it is excessive and therefore dangerous because it has the potential to choke itself, to smother everything in its path. When Milton first describes Adam and Eve, they are one with the Garden...


... middle of paper ...


...strust and breach

Disloyal on the part of Man, revolt,

And disobedience: on the part of Heav'n

Now alienated, distance and distaste... (PL. IX, 1-9)

 

Works Cited and Consulted:

Elledge, Scott, ed. Paradise Lost: An Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism. New York: Norton, 1975.

Fox, Robert C. "The Allegory of Sin and Death in Paradise Lost." Modern Language Quarterly 24 (1963): 354-64.

Lewis, C. S. A Preface to Paradise Lost. Rpt. New York: Oxford UP, 1979.

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. In John Milton: Complete Poems and Major Prose. Ed. Merritt Y. Hughes. Indianapolis: 1980.

O'Keeffe, Timothy J. "An Analogue to Milton's 'Sin' and More on the Tradition." Milton Quarterly 5 (1971): 74-77.

Patrick, John M. "Milton, Phineas Fletcher, Spenser, and Ovid--Sin at Hell's Gates." Notes and Queries Sept. 1956: 384-86.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Connections in John Milton's Paradise Lost Essay - Paradise Lost: Connections "Put that down... NOW!" As many of us have grown older, familiar phrases return to us that were instilled during our childhood. These ideas taught us how to grow and learn within the world. Just As our Parents taught us these words, God taught Satan and everyone under him ideas for their further growth and enrichment. "Paradise Lost" contains connections which are still used today. "Paradise Lost's" initial connections begin with the awesome power of God. Another connection states Satan being theroot of all evil....   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays] 574 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Lust, Violence, and Death in John Milton's Paradise Lost Essay - Lust, Violence, and Death in Paradise Lost   Images and allusions to sex and death are intermingled throughout John Milton's Paradise Lost. The character of Satan serves as not only an embodiment of death and sin, but also insatiated sexual lust. The combination of sex and lust has significant philosophical implications, especially in relation to themes of creation, destruction, and the nature of existence. Milton, in Paradise Lost, establishes that with sex, as with religion, he is of no particular hierarchical establishment....   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
2930 words
(8.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on The Fallen Angels in John Milton's Paradise Lost - The Fallen Angels in Paradise Lost       The fallen angels are Satan's minions and the voices by which Milton may express a variety of opinions and views, showing the diversity and intricacies of Hell, and the immorality of their actions and proposals. Whilst we are often impressed by the skill with which the individual leaders perform their tasks and speeches, we are never left in any doubt as to the truth of G-d, and the futility of their debates.  By examining the angels as a group, Milton is able to leave the infernal dungeon, to take a flight throughout history, giving his own point of view.  It is thus that Books I and II of "Paradise Lost" are so unique, as the...   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
2066 words
(5.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on A Complex Satan in John Milton's Paradise Lost - Milton's Complex Satan in Paradise Lost Milton's Satan continues to fascinate critics largely because he is more complex than the Devil of the Christian tradition appears. Satan's rebelliousness, his seeking of transcendence, his capacity for action, particularly unconventional action, endeared him to certain types of minds, even if their viewpoint might be considered theologically misleading. Milton often follows the road of intellectual definition for his characters, of reasoning demonstration....   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays] 741 words
(2.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Speech and Deception in John Milton's Paradise Lost - Speech and Deception in Milton's Paradise Lost "Rhetoric and sophistry testify to the fact that the world in which we live is a world of speech, that the clever man can compose at will in order to trick others." 1 Speech was perhaps the most important medium for Milton.  As a blind poet, his lack of visual faculties was augmented by a renewed importance on auditory paths to enlightenment, especially the communicative.  Therefore, contemplation of dialogue in Paradise Lost becomes an essential tool for developing a correct understanding of the characters, as Milton would have intended.  Nowhere is this truer than with the character of Satan.  Throughout the text, his rhetoric ex...   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1724 words
(4.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on The Power of Milton’s Paradise Lost - Paradise Lost is an epic poem portraying John Milton’s theological standpoints. The theme is knowledge and the fall of man. Milton uses his poem to state some of his theological beliefs and his personal reflections. Milton wrote Paradise Lost in the 17th century but uses influence from classic poets. Milton’s epic is an extremely important piece of literature. The excerpt used in this commentary takes on the subjects of sin and the punishment with regards to the atonement from God’s point of view....   [tags: Paradise Lost Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
2224 words
(6.4 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Treatise for the Christian Soldier in John Milton’s Paradise Lost Essay - Milton's Treatise for the Christian Soldier in Paradise Lost            While the War in Heaven, presented in Book VI of John Milton's Paradise Lost, operates as a refutation of the concept of glory associated with the epic tradition, the episode also serves a major theological purpose. It provides nothing less than a perfect example of how the Christian soldier should act obediently in combating evil, guarding against temptation, and remaining ever vigilant against the forces of darkness. It also offers the ultimate hope that Satan can be thwarted and comforts Christians in the knowledge that Satan cannot be victorious....   [tags: Milton Paradise Lost Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
3827 words
(10.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Milton: The Poet Essay - John Milton was born in London in 1608 (Merriman). His grandfather was a Roman Catholic who had disowned Milton's father when he turned Protestant (Merriman). The boy was sent to St. Paul's school, and he learned Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, and began to try to write poetry (Merriman). In 1625 he enrolled at Christ's College, Cambridge, clashed with his tutor the following year and was suspended, returned and was given another tutor, and graduated on schedule (Merriman). The University in those days still undertook to teach largely by repeat memorization, and Milton thought his training there of little value (Merriman)....   [tags: John Milton, Biography, Writer]
:: 4 Works Cited
1357 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and John Milton's Paradise Lost Essay - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and John Milton's Paradise Lost “Forth reaching to the Fruit, She pluck’d, she eat:/ Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat/ Sighing through all her Works gave signs of woe,/ That all was lost […]” (PL 8. 781-784) In the gothic novel Frankenstein, Mary Shelley weaves an intricate web of allusions through her characters’ expedient desires for knowledge. Both the actions of Frankenstein, as well as his monster allude to John Milton’s Paradise Lost....   [tags: Shelley Milton Frankenstein Paradise Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1686 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Satiation in John Milton’s Paradise Lost and Margaret Cavendish’s Blazing World - Satiation in John Milton’s Paradise Lost and Margaret Cavendish’s Blazing World Hell is huge but it isn’t big enough. Within the text of Paradise Lost by John Milton, it is, A universe of death, which God by curse Created evil, for evil only good,Where all life dies, death lives, and nature breeds,Perverse, all monstrous, all prodigious things,Abominable, inutterable, and worse… (II.622-6)There is no satiety in Hell. Eden, by comparison, is a relatively small place in Milton’s epic poem, but it seems to be an environment replete with satisfaction....   [tags: Paradise lost Blazing World]
:: 8 Works Cited
2795 words
(8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]