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Language Separation in Immigrant Families Essay

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Language Separation in Immigrant Families


In America, each family usually has a standard language spoken in the household.
Communication is easy and mothers can talk with their children and they can connect with them. Some people who have this benefit are unaware that some families do not have this advantage in their homes. Lee Thomas and Linh Cao understand that some families have language change through each generation. Cao herself lived in house where her relatives used several different languages and learned first hand that there are many losses when a family doesn’t share a common language.

Thomas and Cao wrote this article specifically for parents and families that have language separation through generations. Both authors have background knowledge about language from their experiences. Thomas was a teacher of linguistics at the University of Nevada. Cao taught English at Sparks High School in Nevada. Cao also grew up in a family where the language predominately spoken by each person changed by age group. She was born in Vietnam and her first language was ...


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