Preview
Preview

Physicality and Emotional Attachment in Shakespeare's Sonnet 46 Essay

:: 1 Works Cited
Length: 1099 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Physicality and Emotional Attachment in Shakespeare's Sonnet 46

 
   In "Sonnet 46" of his works about the blond young man, William Shakespeare presents a unique view on the classic debate about physical lust versus emotional love. The poet struggles to decide if his feelings are based upon superficial desire and infatuation, represented by the "eye" (1), or true love independent of the physical world, symbolized by the "heart" (1). With a deft movement from violent imagery in the first two lines to the civilized language of law, Shakespeare dismisses the commonly accepted view of a battle between the eye and the heart.  The diction of warfare denotes two very separate alien sides clashing in destructive confrontation. Shakespeare advances quickly away from such wording, setting his debate in the civilized context of a courtroom. While the parties engaged in a lawsuit are competing, they are not seeking the destruction of their opposition. A common bond exists between the two sides of a legal case, the bond of society. They are parts of the same whole, or they would not be bound by the laws of that whole. The same holds for the eye and the heart, as well as their metaphysical counterparts, lust and spiritual bonding. The eye and the heart are but organs that make up the body. Physical desire and emotional attraction are just aspects of the overlying concept of love.  This is Shakespeare's final point: both physicality and emotional attachment combine to form the powerful force humans know as love.

     The opening quatrain of "Sonnet 46" sets up the conflict of infatuation versus true love, acknowledging the classic view of a battle between opposing forces, but swiftly moving beyond such a black an...


... middle of paper ...


...an iambic foot, "As thus" (13), allowing the third quatrain to flow directly into couplet. The poet also repeats the rhyme of "part" (13) and "heart" (14) from lines 12 and 10 of the third quatrain, tying the couplet even closer to the body of the poem. Shakespeare presents a common sense solution to the problem, declaring the entire conflict to be almost irrelevant. Lust is based on external aesthetic appeal, so the poet bestows the "outward part" (13) of the poem's young object upon the eye. True love draws its strength from an internal bonding of spirits, and therefore Shakespeare deeds the "inward love" (14) to the heart. And these two halves together form love.

Work Cited

Shakespeare, William. "Sonnet 46." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Eds. M. H. Abrams and Stephen Greenblatt. 7th ed. 2 vols. New York: Norton, 2000. 1: 1033.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Dicussion of the Purpose of Shakespeare's "Sonnet 18" Essay example - Shakespeare's collection of sonnets is heralded as one of the greatest, most ambitious sonnet collections in English literature. Of these154 sonnets, the first 126 of them are addressed to a 'fair youth', a beatiful young man, with whom Shakespeare has developed an intimate friendship. The overarching theme of devotion in antimony to mortality denotes that “Sonnet 18” is predominantly a love poem. Accordingly the purpose of the poem seems initially to be to compare his beloved friend's handsomness with a common symbol of beauty, a fine summer's day....   [tags: poetry analysis]
:: 4 Works Cited
1137 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Emotional Versus Physical: The Struggle in Words - Known as one of the most influential and important English Renaissance authors, William Shakespeare paved the path for sonnet writers and modern poets. Shakespeare is the author of 37 plays and 154 sonnets. Each sonnet deals with personal themes and can work collectively as a story or individually. The first 126 of the sonnets are addressed to a young nobleman, while the rest are addressed to a woman known as the ‘dark lady’. In Sonnet 27, the narrator has returned from a long journey, tired, but unable to sleep, because he is plagued with thoughts about his relationship and visions of the subject....   [tags: shakespeare, sonnets, figurative language] 770 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Justifying Mutual Deceit in William Shakespeare's Sonnet 138 Essay examples - Justifying Mutual Deceit in William Shakespeare's Sonnet 138 A common conception of William Shakespeare’s poetry entails complex language and hidden meanings. Shakespeare is famous for his ability to author a web of images that creates layers of interpretations and understandings. In Sonnet 138 however, Shakespeare is more direct in describing his relationship with his lover by avoiding imagery and metaphors, explaining to the reader that this seemingly unconventional relationship is indeed justified....   [tags: William Shakespeare Sonnet] 1862 words
(5.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on The Sonnet Form and its Meaning: Shakespeares Sonnet 65 - The Sonnet Form and its Meaning: Shakespeare Sonnet 65            The sonnet, being one of the most traditional and recognized forms of poetry, has been used and altered in many time periods by writers to convey different messages to the audience. The strict constraints of the form have often been used to parallel the subject in the poem. Many times, the first three quatrains introduce the subject and build on one another, showing progression in the poem. The final couplet brings closure to the poem by bringing the main ideas together....   [tags: William Shakespeare Sonnet 65 Essays] 1853 words
(5.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
William Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 Essay examples - Keeping love alive is not easy. One knows that life eventually comes to an end, but does love. Time passes and days must end. It is in "Sonnet 18", by Shakespeare, that we see a challenge to the idea that love is finite. Shakespeare shows us how some love is eternal and will live on forever in comparison to a beautiful summer's day. Shakespeare has a way of keeping love alive in "Sonnet 18", and he uses a variety of techniques to demonstrate how love is more brilliant and everlasting than a summer's day....   [tags: Shakespeare Sonnet]
:: 1 Works Cited
935 words
(2.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Tension between Beauty and Virtue in Shakespeare's Sonnet 95 Essay - The Tension between Beauty and Virtue in Shakespeare's Sonnet 95      "Sonnet 95" of Shakespeare's "blond young man" sonnets depicts a tension-filled variation on the classic blazon. The poet seems torn between the "shame" (1) that taints his subject and the "sweets" (4) of the subject 's beauty. The initial imagery of a "canker" (2) within a "rose" (2) serves to set up the sexual overtones that dominate the poem, as well as to create the sense of strain between disapproval and attraction that heightens throughout each quatrain....   [tags: Shaksespeare Sonnet essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1129 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on An Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 116 - An Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 116 Shakespeare's Sonnet 116, denying Time's harvest of love, contains 46 iambic, 15 spondaic, 6 pyrrhic, and 3 trochaic feet. Like the varying magnitudes of stars that distinguish the sky's constellations, infused with myths describing all degrees and types of love, the spondaic, trochaic, and pyrrhic substitutions create a pattern of meaning that can be inferred by the discerning eye and mind. Shakespeare emphasizes his denial of the effects of Time on love by accenting "not" in lines 1, 2, 9, and 11, and "no" in lines 5 and 14....   [tags: Shakespeare Sonnet Essays 116 Papers]
:: 1 Works Cited
544 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Women in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 Essay - Women in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 Shakespeare is expressing, though not in the first person, that he knows women are not the perfect beauties they are portrayed to be and that we should love them anyway. He uses two types of descriptions, one of their physical beauty and the other of their characteristics to make fun of all those ‘romantic’ poets trying to ‘brown nose’ the girls they like. One of the physical attributes, in the first quatrain, that he mentions is his “mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun,” meaning she has no ‘twinkle’ in her eyes....   [tags: Sonnet 130 Shakespeare Women Essays] 459 words
(1.3 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Analyzing Shakespearean Sonnet Essay - Analyzing Shakespearean Sonnet William Shakespeare's sonnet, That Time of Year Thou Mayst in Me Behold emphasizes that death is upon us stressing on the importance of love. By using metaphors he relates death to nature. Using symbolism of autumn leaves, twilight and glowing fire evolving to one conclusion awaiting death. By using Iambic meter he is showing a rising effect to get to the climax of the sonnet. Shakespeare shows how his character is weighed down by torment that his life is coming to an end....   [tags: William Shakespeare Sonnet Essays] 1099 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Free Essay on Shakespeare’s Sonnet 65 - Here's Shakespeare's sonnet no. 65. I'm going to (a) space it out and (b) add in a running commentary that might be helpful to suggest the kinds of reactions one might have in reading it. Let me know if this helps. Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea "nor"="and not". A list . . . a slowly paced list. Of what sorts of things. what scope. what do they have in common?. . . Sentence is just beginning . . . But sad mortality o'er-sways their power, Ah . . . none of them last....   [tags: Shakespeare Sonnet 65] 725 words
(2.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]