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Developmental Changes in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Essay

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Developmental Changes in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

 
   In the novel "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain, the

protagonist, Huck, undergoes a series of developmental changes in his character.

He is often torn between the ideas of society and those of his friends.  This

can all be very confusing for a boy who is about 14 years old.  Huck also has a

drunken pap who doesn't care at all for him.  Huck is then forced to live with

Widow Douglas and Miss Watson.  Throughout the story we see Huck represent the

morals of the innocent prevailing over those of society.  In his "adventures,"

he learns the meaning of true friendship and what's really important in life.

 

     In the story, Huck makes the decision to escape from his "family."  This is

a decision that goes against the morals of Huck's society, church and state.

Children aren't supposed to run away from their parents.  Also, his decision to

help Jim escape goes against the same morals.  In his "adventurous" escape down

the Mississippi, he begins to feel truly free.  This is a feeling that is

contrasted acutely of society's "oppression" of freedom, basically when he is on

land.  In Jim's and Huck's escape, they are able to build their trust and

friendship for each other.  However, at the same time he must leave behind

societies ways...  getting "sivilized, money, and "family."

 

     Along Jim's and Huck's "adventure," they have many conversations along the

way.  These conversations consist about their freedom, money, and superstition.

In the story, they both have their own opinions about various things, like

Solomon.

 

          "'Well, b...


... middle of paper ...


...against his society.  Huck had left his "family" and avoided getting "

sivilized."  In his quest for true "freedom," Huck was able to grow considerably

and mature, yet, he was still not mature enough to formulate ideas of his own.

Nonetheless, no matter how Huck's ideas and morals change, he will always remain

a true friend to Jim.  Adventurous or not, this book was great in showing that

the white's weren't always right and blacks could also be great in many respects.

 

Works Cited and Consulted

Adams, Richard P. "The Unity and Coherence of Huckleberry Finn". Tulane  Studies in English, VI (1956), 89-103. Rpt. "Twentieth Century Interpretations of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" Ed. Claude M Simpson. Englewood Cliffs,N.J. 1968.

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001.


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