Preview
Preview

Creating a Real Human Being in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 3075 words (8.8 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Creating a Real Human Being in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley was a Nineteenth-century English novelist. Mary Shelley,
the wife of poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, is best known for her
philosophical gothic horror story Frankenstein which was wrote in 1816
and published two years later in 1818. The novel was produced during a
time of great upheaval and change, and in the era of 'Romanticism'.
This was a reaction to the previous 'age of reason' where social
order, science, and rationality had dominated the way of thinking.
'Romanticism' celebrated emotions, the exotic, and nature over
technology and the individual self.

The idea of 'Frankenstein' came to Mary one night when she was staying
by a lake in Geneva after telling frightening stories with her husband
Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron. That night Mary had a terrifying
dream, she told her husband about the dream the next morning and he
encouraged her to develop and expand on what she had dreamt. In the
novel, scientist Victor Frankenstein infuses life into a collection of
inanimate body parts, the "birth" of his creation overwhelms
Frankenstein with the horror of what he has done.

The novel 'Frankenstein' is an example of gothic horror. This genre
became widely enjoyed because it was adventurous, imaginative and
exciting, a complete contrast to all that had gone on during the age
of reason. 'Frankenstein' includes some classic characteristics of
gothic horror. For example, 'Frankenstein' is set in wild/remote
locations, uses imaginative plots and deals with the subjects of
identity and the individual self, set apart from society.

Certain key events in Mary Shell...


... middle of paper ...


...ires social company and
is intruiged by humans and sees kindness and good in them. He also
appreciates artistic type things, such as, music and feels pain, and
reacts to it by crying.

There are things that differenciate the 'monster' and humans. For
instance, a human being must be conceived by both a man and a woman,
not made out of other human's body parts. Another thing, which
differentiates him and humans, is the fact that the monster lives out
in the wilderness alone, not in a home with a family.

In my personal opinion, I feel the 'monster' is human as there are
only two reasons to why the 'monster' created by Victor Frankenstein
is not human, and far more reasons why he can be classed as a human.
In my opinion, a human can be defined by having feelings. The
'monster' certainly does, as he experienced many.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Creating a Real Human Being in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Essay - Creating a Real Human Being in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Mary Shelley was a Nineteenth-century English novelist. Mary Shelley, the wife of poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, is best known for her philosophical gothic horror story Frankenstein which was wrote in 1816 and published two years later in 1818. The novel was produced during a time of great upheaval and change, and in the era of 'Romanticism'. This was a reaction to the previous 'age of reason' where social order, science, and rationality had dominated the way of thinking....   [tags: Papers] 3075 words
(8.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Ethical Issues in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay - Mary Shelley expresses various ethical issues by creating a mythical monster called Frankenstein. There is some controversy on how Mary Shelley defines human nature in the novel, there are many features of the way humans react in situations. Shelley uses a relationship between morality and science, she brings the two subjects together when writing Frankenstein, and she shows the amount of controversy with the advancement of science. There are said to be some limits to the scientific inquiry that could have restrained the quantity of scientific implications that Mary Shelley was able to make, along with the types of scientific restraints....   [tags: Ethic, Mary Shelley, Frankenstein,] 1228 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Nature vs Nurture in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Essay - Philosophers and scientists alike have debated for centuries whether a person’s character is the result of nature or nurture. In the writings of Thomas Hobbes, it is expressed that humans are endowed with character from birth, and that they are innately evil in nature. John Locke’s response to this theory is that everyone is born with a tabula rasa, or blank slate, and then develops character after a series of formative experiences. The idea that true character is the result of experiences and societal interaction is a theme deeply explored throughout Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein....   [tags: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein]
:: 6 Works Cited
2037 words
(5.8 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Essay on Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Mary Shelley was born in 1797. She had a difficult life with many family upsets’, miscarriages and suffered personal depression; she died aged 53. Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein firstly as a short ghost story but it was published as a novel in 1816. Frankenstein is a Gothic novel and it deals with two genres, Gothicism and science fiction. Gothicism is part of the Romantic Movement that started in the late eighteenth century. The Romantic Movement is based on freedom of thought and expression and the belief of living in an age of new beginnings and high possibilities....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein Essays] 3360 words
(9.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Evaluation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay - Evaluation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Form, Structure and Plot      Frankenstein, an epistolary novel by Mary Shelley, deals with epistemology, is divided into three volumes, each taking place at a distinct time. Volume I highlights the correspondence in letters between Robert Walton, an Arctic seafarer, and his sister, Margaret Saville. Walton's letters to Margaret basically explain his expedition at sea and introduce Victor Frankenstein, the protagonist of the novel. Volume II is essentially Frankenstein's narrative, told in his point of view, with much action, death, and many more characters....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
2356 words
(6.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Character Development in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay - Character Development in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein     In any novel the author is free to create and shape their characters in whatever way they see fit. In Frankenstein, Shelley does an excellent job of shaping her characters, be it however minute their part in the story, so that the reader gets a clear picture of Shelley's creations. It seems that each character in Shelley's Frankenstein is created by Shelley to give the reader a certain impression of the character. By doing this Shelley creates the characters the way she wants us to see them....   [tags: Frankenstein Mary Shelley Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1648 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about Review of Mary Shelley's Frankeinstein - Frankenstein is a Romantic Horror novel written by Mary Shelley. Originally published in 1818, a revised version was also published in 1831. As a Romantic novel, Frankenstein is very emotional and addresses the connection between man and nature. This nightmarish tale was the result of a friendly challenge between Shelley, Percy Shelley, Lord Byron, and Claire Clairmont to see who could compose the most horrifying ghost story. Shelley won after conceiving the idea of Frankenstein after experiencing a dream....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein] 1033 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essays - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein The characterization of Victor’s creature, the monster, in the movie although somewhat dramatically different from Mary Shelley’s portrayal in the novel Frankenstein also had its similarities. Shelley’s views of the monster were to make him seem like a human being, while the movie made the monster out to be a hideous creation. The creature’s appearance and personality are two aspects that differ between the novel and movie while his intellectual and tender sides were portrayed the same....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein Essays] 933 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Chapter 5 of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essays - Chapter 5 of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Within this essay I intend to discuss how Frankenstein and his creature change and how subconsciously they love each other. Chapter 5 will be used to show different themes as well as seeing how Frankenstein acts around his creation. Also the way Frankenstein has played God will be seen in this chapter. I will start this essay by looking at chapter 5. Shelley shows, in chapter 5, Frankenstein and the creature’s reaction to the ‘creation’. Shelley conveys Frankenstein’s horror at the creature he has brought to life and his reaction to it....   [tags: Mary Shelley Victor Frankenstein Essays] 2011 words
(5.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Developments and Changes the Monster Undergoes in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley - The Developments and Changes the Monster Undergoes in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Frankenstein is a classic novel by Mary Shelley, published in 1818. It recounts the life of Victor Frankenstein; Victor is a young, idealistic student of natural philosophy whose aim is to discover the elixir of life. He succeeds in his aim and consequently brings into existence a monstrous creation. However, he abandons his creation, which is then forced to discover the complicated ways in which society and the world works, in a very cruel but candid and unequivocal manner....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein Essays] 7579 words
(21.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]