Preview
Preview

Reflection on Rime of the Ancient Mariner Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 1121 words (3.2 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Reflection on Rime of the Ancient Mariner


Samuel Coleridge's poem entitled "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" is written as a ballad, in the general form of the traditional ballad of medieval or early Elizabethan times. Coleridge uses the ballad stanza, a four-line stanza. He is able to achieve a richer, more sweeping sense of the supernatural through these expansions; he is able to move beyond the more domesticated kind of supernaturalism of the four-line stanza.
He starts with the usual ballad stanza in the first of the poem, in order to make the reader acquainted with the verse form and with the poetic ethos of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (Beer 34). These early stanzas seem to anchor the reader's mind. But in the twelfth stanza, the pattern changes to a a a b c b. By this time the reader has become at home in the poem. Interestingly, the change occurs, certainly by Coleridge's deliberate intent, at the point in the poem when the Wedding-Guest makes his last major protest to the Mariner. The action of the voyage is about to begin. One example of the variation of the ballad form is that Coleridge throughout the poem will occasionally insert a line that does nothing to further the story (see stanza three, Part II) but that enriches the emotional texture of the poem. Humphry House writes that Coleridge's attraction to the ballad form was probably owing in great measure to the liberation it afforded him from the confines of modern life, a freedom it gave him to move spaciously within the unbounded areas of imaginative creation (103).
My own reading and outside research make it quite clear that there is certainly behind the character of the Mariner in the poem the traditional story of the Wandering Jew. The story ...


... middle of paper ...


...es not make explanations usually for what he does, at least not in the terms that humans would consider intelligent, one may find himself living in a world where his best efforts at rationality are foolish, considering the terms in which the God Who Acts is acting. There is through all of the Bible the theme of God's wisdom making man's wisdom foolish. And in "Rime of the Ancient Mariner," Coleridge is apparently haunted by this fact.





















Bibliography:






Works Cited



Beer, J. B., Coleridge the Visionary (New York, 1962).

Bodkin, Maud, Archetypal Patterns in Poetry (London, 1934).

House, Humphry, Coleridge (London, 1953)

Lowes, John Livingston, The Road to Xanadu (Boston, 1964).

Warren, Robert Penn, "A Poem of Pure Imagination," in
edition of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (New York,
1946).



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Coleridge's in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan Essay - How Does Coleridge in 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' and 'Kubla Khan' Show the Interrelatedness Between Mankind, Nature and the Poetic Experience. Coleridge expresses many thoughtful and rather intense ideas in his poetry, through using either peculiar or common images of all forms of nature ie human, environmental or supernatural. His poetic expression is unique in its use of extraordinary imagery and transition of mood yet he what he creates usually conforms to numerous literary techniques....   [tags: essays research papers] 806 words
(2.3 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Essay - Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is a poem about a lone sailor who survives a disastrous voyage at sea. Believing himself to be responsible for this tragedy he dooms himself to recount his tale to strangers. The most common interpretation of this poem is the religious view of crime and punishment. Early in the poem the Mariner shoots an albatross a symbol of good luck. Since it is a moral wrong to shoot the albatross, for you are supposed to love “all things both great and small”, the crew eventually was punished....   [tags: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner]
:: 2 Works Cited
1434 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Essay - It has been suggested that The Rime of the Ancient Mariner may be read as a religious text, presenting ‘nothing less than the fall of man’. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner has been interpreted in a variety of ways since it’s creation in 1797. Some, such as Gavin McGann, argue that ballad is a story of our salvation of Christ, whereas others dispute this, believing it to be a metaphor for Original Sin in the Garden of Eden. Whilst these interpretations may differ, the view that The Rime may be read as a religious text does not....   [tags: Rime Ancient Mariner] 1389 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner Essay - Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner In Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner the reader finds an enduring tale. Although the poem is nearly 200 years old it remains a popular piece by way of the novel juxtapositions and contradictions that are so eloquently described that the reader is both drawn in by the logic of the descriptions as well as fascinated by the complete unreality depicted in the poem. It is highly unlikely anyone could claim an understanding of the events told by the Ancient Mariner—the reader today, as well as in Coleridge’s time is akin to the man in the wedding party, listening to the Mariner’s tale with a mix of horror, astonishment and disbelief....   [tags: Coleridge Rime Ancient Mariner Essays] 1565 words
(4.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on The Wedding Guest in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - The Wedding Guest in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner             What does it mean to be wise. Webster's Dictionary defines the word "wise" as being "marked by deep understanding, keen discerment". Through the telling of the ancient Mariner's tale, the Wedding-Guest became sadder and wiser. He became sad in that he identified himself with the shallow and self-absorbed mariner. However, the mariner changed his ways. The Wedding-Guest became wise through realizing that he himself needed to alter his ways....   [tags: Rime Ancient Mariner Essays] 844 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Respect for Nature in Rime of the Ancient Mariner Essay - Respect for Nature in Rime of the Ancient Mariner    "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is a parable of a seaman's crime against nature (pointlessly killing an albatross) and his repentance by blessing the lowly water-snakes.  Setting the poem in the Middle Ages in the then-unknown seas near Antarctica, the poet is able to make his narrative credible and give the reader what is called 'the willing suspension of disbelief.'  "   This seven part ballad begins as a tale told by an "ancient Mariner" who has grabbed hold of a Wedding Guest and captivates his will by sharing his wild tale at sea: "The Wedding-Guest stood still, And listens like a three years' child: The Mariner hath his will...   [tags: Rime Ancient Mariner] 699 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Wrong Actions in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Essay examples - Rime of the Ancient Mariner: Wrong Actions The idea of people making wrong actions and having to pay for them afterwards is not new. The Christian religion centers itself around the confession of sins done by men or women. Luckily, they have the power to repent and do penance to receive God’s forgiveness. God sends people this power and people around the world mimic this cycle of crime, punishment, repentance, and reconciliation in court systems and other penal codes. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" helps implement all this cycle with the murder of the albatross and how he must pay for his actions....   [tags: The Rime of the Ancient Mariner] 676 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Free College Essays - Nature in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – Nature "Look out Below!" - Craaack!  About 15 Men and women turn their glances toward the sky, and see a large, perhaps 100 feet, tree falling to the ground.  As the tree hits the solid earth, everything grows very quiet. All look at the lumberjack, who killed this tree, and find him weeping in sorrow. This situation is not uncommon when dealing with Nature.  Nature, as simple as it seems to some, generates great power.  This power is sent to us, as nature forgives only after a physical, emotional, and spiritual suffering....   [tags: Rime Ancient Mariner] 653 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Symbols and Symbolism in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Essay - Symbols in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner A close reading of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner will reveal that the Ancient Mariner-who is at once himself, Coleridge and all humanity-having sinned, both incurs punishment and seeks redemption; or, in other words, becomes anxiously aware of his relation to the God of Law (as symbolized by the Sun), and in his sub-consciousness earnestly entreats the forgiveness of the God of Love (represented by the Moon-symbol). ... For Professor Lowes, while he has disclosed a Coleridge of amazing intellectual grasp ......   [tags: Rime] 2465 words
(7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Samuel Taylor Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Essay - Samuel Taylor Coleridge's “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” seems like a simple story of a man lost at sea and defeating the odds, but if you hone in on the visual and aural details you see that it’s much more. The whole story revolves around the theme of religious transformation and Coleridge uses these visual and aural symbols to convey and drive home this theme. He starts the story immediately with a lot of detail creating the setting of where the mariner is going and to whom the mariner is going to tell his tale....   [tags: the mariner's manifest motive]
:: 1 Works Cited
1496 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]