Preview
Preview

The Apocalypse of Adam Essay

:: 4 Works Cited
Length: 2341 words (6.7 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


     "He received glory and power there. / And thus he came upon the water." This refrain is a common motif throughout the most analyzed section of The Apocalypse of Adam. This section is that of the 13 kingdoms, in which each kingdom explains where the illuminator came from. Each ends with a common form of the refrain above. The meaning of these 13 kingdoms will be discussed later. In this paper, many different aspects of The Apocalypse of Adam will be looked at in an attempt to better understand the implications this text has for its readers. This text is the fifth and last tractate in Nag Hammadi Codex V. The Nag Hammadi library was found in August 1945 in Egypt. When looked at in comparison with other texts found, The Apocalypse of Adam more closely follows the traditions of Jewish apocalyptic literature (Parrott, 67). There has been much debate about the effect of redactors on this text, so there has been a claim that the 13 kingdoms section was added in later by an editor (ibid). The text recovered is in Coptic, the common language around Nag Hammadi, Egypt at that time. However, much of the text is not readable, with tops or bottoms of pages missing. Therefore, there has been a lot of reconstruction of the text, but there are still places in which lacunae have been inserted because it is not clear what the author intended to say. The text can be broken down into three sections that are identifiable by a change in topic. The first section ([67],22-[76],7) talks about a special race of men that come "from the knowledge of the great eons and the angels" (Hedrick, 29). This part also discusses their "conflict" with god. God then tries to wipe them out, and their survival is ensured by "divine intervention" (ibid). The second...


... middle of paper ...


...ebates about its intended audience, it's intended purpose, and the significance of the hymnic or 13 Kingdom section. The Apocalypse of Adam is a most interesting piece of literature that leaves itself open to many different interpretations.

 

Works Cited

Carroll, Scott T. "The Apocalypse of Adam and pre-Christian Gnosticism [dating of tractate by analysis of Solomonic legend]." Vigiliae Christianae: A Review of Early Christian Life and Language 44 (1990): 263-279.

Hedrick, Charles W. The Apocalypse of Adam: a literary and source analy[s]is. Chico, Calif: Scholars Press, 1980.

Linder, Per-Arne. The Apocalypse of Adam: Nag Hammadi Codex V,5 considered from its Egyptian background. Loberod: Plus Ultra, 1991.

Parrott, Douglas. "The 13 Kingdoms of the Apocalypse of Adam: origin, meaning and significance." Novum Testament 31 (Jan 1989): 67-87.

 


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Advertising at the Edge of the Apocalypse, by Sut Jhally Essay - Sut Jhally, a professor at the university of Massachusetts of whom won the distinguished teacher award, wrote in his essay “ Advertising at the Edge of the Apocalypse” that : 20th century advertising - the most powerful propaganda in human history - will destroy the world as we know it. The survival of the human race will depend upon our ability to minimize the harmful effects of Advertising. These effects will have lasting impacts on our culture, joy, and future. According to Karl Marx Capitalism depends on the sale of commodities....   [tags: sut jhally, apocalypse]
:: 1 Works Cited
1091 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Reflection about Eve and Adam Essay - A significant issue put forward in this contention is a re-examination of the significance of the name Adam, (“Adham” in Hebrew). Although some use “Adham” as a correct name for the male creation of God, Dr. Trible informs us that the phrase “Adham” can be utilised as a generic term for humankind – “adham is an androgynous term; one creature incorporating two sexes.” Secondly, the scribe points out that the creation of woman was a divine proceed rather than a demand by Adam. She extracts Genesis 2:18, in which God concludes that Adam needs a “helper fit for him.” The focus being on the phrase “helper” (“ezer” in Hebrew)....   [tags: god creation, adam, eve, genesis] 529 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Gender and Adam and Eve Essay - Throughout modern society nothing symbolizes the fall of humankind more than a woman with feminine flowing hair and luscious lips biting into a large apple. While the biblical account evoking such imagery remains the primary authority, John Milton in Paradise Lost enlightens beyond the allegorical, offering a complexity of character and purpose. In this epic, readers are guided along humanity’s fall from grace, contrasting the ideal union of man and wife alongside harsh consequences that emerge from dangerous engendered perspectives....   [tags: grace, Eden, Adam, Eve, Wadlock, Milton]
:: 6 Works Cited
2340 words
(6.7 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Essay about Eliot and Methodism in Adam Bede - Eliot and Methodism in Adam Bede     Adam Bede was George Eliot's-pseudonym of Mary Ann Evans-second book and first novel. Eliot was raised in a strict Methodist family. Her friendships with two skeptical philosophers, Charles Bray and Charles Hennell, brought her to challenge and eventually reject her rigid religious upbringing  ("George Eliot" 91). Adam Bede was based on a story told to Eliot by one of her Methodist aunts, a tragicomedy, and the moral of the novel is that man cannot escape the results of his actions (Wiesenfarth 145)....   [tags: Adam Bede]
:: 8 Works Cited
1078 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Operatic Melodrama in Apocalypse Now Essay - Operatic Melodrama in Apocalypse Now The political and social unrest of the 1970s provided Hollywood with some of its most influential films, often stemming from unlikely sources; two decades after melodrama's heyday, the genre re-emerged in an original form that continues to affect modern filmmaking. The historical influences of Italian opera and Hollywood family melodramas spawned a type of film that has been described as "historical, operatic, choral or epic" (Greene 388). Filmmakers of the 1970s explored the traditional modes of melodramatic expression in order to address the socially charged times they lived in....   [tags: Apocalypse Now Essays] 2286 words
(6.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
An Analysis of Geoffrey Hill’s Little Apocalypse Essay - An Analysis of Geoffrey Hill’s Little Apocalypse      Seamus Heaney’s “The Redress of Poetry” reveals the idea that “it is the imagination [of poetry] pressing back  against the pressure of reality (1).”  The two opposing forces of imagination and reality are active in Geoffrey Hill’s  “Little Apocalypse.”  The poem deals with the personal religious conflict of Friedrich Hoderlin (1770-1843), a German lyric poet.  Hill focuses on Hoderlin’s struggle with his strong belief in Greek mythology and then Contemporary Protestant theology....   [tags: Little Apocalypse]
:: 3 Works Cited
486 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
An Analysis of Adam’s Song Essay - An Analysis of Adam’s Song      Bob McKenty suggests in the poem "Adam's Song" that life is not a stationary event, it is forever changing and that in order to handle those changes humor serves as a good buffer. The tone of "Adam's Song" changes distinctly at least three times. McKenty uses rhythm, rhyme, and meter to express the essence of change in the poem and in life. The first couplet of the poem is iambic tetrameter and expresses a sentimental, romantic and lyrical tone. The speaker in the poem at this point could be described as a possibly young and naive lover....   [tags: Adam’s Song] 697 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Apocalypse of William S. Burroughs’ Naked Lunch Essay - The Apocalypse of William S. Burroughs’ Naked Lunch The roaring of lions, the howling of wolves, the raging of the stormy sea, and the destructive sword, are portions of eternity too great for the eye of man. (William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, p. 7) In 1980, William S. Burroughs delivered a speech at the Planet Earth Conference at the Institute of Ecotechnics in Aix-en-Provence titled ‘The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse’.1 In this speech, Burroughs, following religious tradition, says that the four horsemen of the apocalypse are Famine, Plague, War, and Death and moves on to prophesise a more contemporaneous apocalypse....   [tags: Apocalypse Burroughs Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
5466 words
(15.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on W.B. Yeats' Adam's Curse - W.B. Yeats' "Adam's Curse" Though written only two years after the first version of "The Shadowy Waters", W.B. Yeats' poem "Adam's Curse" can be seen as an example of a dramatic transformation of Yeats' poetic works: a movement away from the rich mythology of Ireland's Celtic past and towards a more accessible poesy focused on the external world. Despite this turn in focus towards the world around him, Yeats retains his interest in symbolism, and one aspect of his change in style is internalization of the symbolic scheme that underlies his poetry....   [tags: Yeats Poetry Adam's Curse Essays] 1779 words
(5.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay Adam Smith - Adam Smith Adam Smith, a brilliant eighteenth-century Scottish political economist, had the advantage of judging the significance ol colonies by a rigorous examination based on the colonial experience of 300 years. His overview has a built-in bias: he strongly disapproved of excessive regulation of colonial trade by parent countries. But his analysis is rich with insight and remarkably dispassionate in its argument. Adam Smith recognized that the discovery of the New World not only brought wealth and prosperity to the Old World, but that it also marked a divide in the history of mankind....   [tags: Political Economist Adam Smith Biographies Essays] 4989 words
(14.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]