Preview
Preview

Joyce's Araby: a Double Focus Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 790 words (2.3 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Boy or Man: the Double Focus

On one hand "Araby" is a story of initiation, of a boy's quest for the ideal. Although the quest ends in failure, it results in an inner awareness and the boy's first step into manhood. On another hand the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for the story is told in retrospect by a man who reflects back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight. James Joyce's fascinating double focus: the boy's first experience, and the man's reflection to the unforgotten moments of his childhood provides for the dramatic rendering of a simple story of first love told by a narrator who, with his wider adult vision, can employ the sophisticated use of irony and symbolic imagery necessary to open a window to his soul telling us more about him now than about the child that lives in his memory. As such, the boy's experience is not restricted to youth's encounter with first love. Rather, it is a portrayal of an ongoing problem that he faces all through life: the incongruity of the ideal, of the dream as he wishes it to be, with the austerity of reality.

It is important to understand the nature of the ideal, as the narrator wishes it to be, at the different stages of his life. As a child, he realizes the incongruity of the ideal with the real world when he arrives at the bazaar. His ideal concerns both sacred and earthly love. This is where the expression, "Araby", fulfills its role in the story. Araby stands for Arabia, and in the early 20th century, or about when Dubliners was written, Arabia was perceived as a place of pure and sacred love. This could be further studied in Arabic literature of that time. Because the man, rather than the boy, recounts the experience, an ironic view can...


... middle of paper ...


...ark the idea of her symbolizing the Virgin Mary. However, and underlying the boy's innocent intentions, the adult reflecting back sees the boy as more attracted to her physical attractions (her white neck, her soft hair, the movement of the brown-clad figure). By discovering that his intentions were truly sexual, the narrator infers that the strong values he acquired in his upbringing stopped him from approaching the girl.

Religion is paralleled to a jail in these scenes of events, which, places the idea into the reader's mind of the church being restrictive and entrapping. This establishes the theme of restrictiveness of Roman Catholicism and the effect it had on a decaying Irish society. In a time when open criticism of the church is ill advised, the adult living in the boy seems to be saying that to be truly free is to be free of religious restrictions.



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
James Joyce's Araby - Loss of Innocence in Araby Essays - Loss of Innocence in Araby In her story, "Araby," James Joyce concentrates on character rather than on plot to reveal the ironies inherent in self-deception. On one level "Araby" is a story of initiation, of a boy’s quest for the ideal. The quest ends in failure but results in an inner awareness and a first step into manhood. On another level the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for the story is told in retrospect by a man who looks back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 874 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Araby: A Lesson in Adolescence Essay - “Araby” Lesson in Adolescence In his brief but complex story "Araby," James Joyce concentrates on character rather than on plot to reveal the ironies within self-deception. On one level "Araby" is a story of initiation, of a boy's quest for the ideal. The quest ends in failure but results in an inner awareness and a first step into manhood. On another level the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for a man who looks back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight tells the story in retrospect....   [tags: James Joyce Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1166 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
James Joyce's Araby - Setting in Araby Essay - Setting in James Joyce's Araby   In the opening paragraphs of James Joyce's short story, "Araby," the setting takes center stage to the narrator. Joyce tends carefully to the exquisite detail of personifying his setting, so that the narrator's emotions may be enhanced. To create a genuine sense of mood, and reality, Joyce uses many techniques such as first person narration, style of prose, imagery, and most of all setting. The setting of a short story is vital to the development of character....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1591 words
(4.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
James Joyce's Araby - Araby as Epiphany for the Common Man Essay - James Joyce's Dubliners - Araby as Epiphany for the Common Man Joseph Campbell was one of many theorists who have seen basic common denominators in the myths of the world's great religions, Christianity among them, and have demonstrated how elements of myth have found their way into "non-religious" stories. Action heroes, in this respect, are not unlike saints. Biblical stories are, quite simply, the mythos of the Catholic religion, with saints being the heroes in such stories. The Star Wars film saga is, according to Campbell, an example of the hero's maturation via the undertaking of a great quest....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
2076 words
(5.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
James Joyce's Araby - An Analysis of Araby Essay - An Analysis of Joyce's Araby "Araby" is a short complex story by Joyce that I believe is a reflection of his own life as a boy growing up in Dublin. Joyce uses the voice of a young boy as a narrator; however the narrator seems much more mature then the boy in the story. The story focuses on escape and fantasy; about darkness, despair, and enlightenment: and I believe it is a retrospective of Joyce's look back at life and the constant struggle between ideals and reality. I believe Araby employs many themes; the two most apparent to me are escape and fantasy though I see signs of religion and a boy's first love....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 528 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
James Joyce's Dubliners - Adolescent Initiation Portrayed in Araby Essay - Adolescent Initiation Portrayed in Araby     "Araby" tells the story of an adolescent boy's initiation into adulthood. The story is narrated by a mature man reflecting upon his adolescence and the events that forced him to face the disillusioning realities of adulthood. The minor charac­ters play a pivotal role in this initiation process. The boy observes the hypocrisy of adults in the priest and Mrs. Mercer; and his vain, self-centered uncle introduces him to another disillusioning aspect of adulthood....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays] 1147 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Themes of Alienation and Control in James Joyce's Araby Essay - Alienation of “Araby” Although “Araby” is a fairly short story, author James Joyce does a remarkable job of discussing some very deep issues within it. On the surface it appears to be a story of a boy's trip to the market to get a gift for the girl he has a crush on. Yet deeper down it is about a lonely boy who makes a pilgrimage to an eastern-styled bazaar in hopes that it will somehow alleviate his miserable life. James Joyce’s uses the boy in “Araby” to expose a story of isolation and lack of control....   [tags: James Joyce Araby Themes]
:: 1 Works Cited
1851 words
(5.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
James Joyce's Araby - The Lonely Quest in Araby Essay - The Lonely Quest in "Araby"           Universality of experience makes James Joyce's "Araby" interesting, readers respond instinctively to an experience that could have been their own. It is part of the instinctual nature of man to long for what he feels is the lost spirituality of his world. In all ages man has believed that it is possible to search for and find a talisman, which, if brought back, will return this lost spirituality. The development of theme in "Araby" resembles the myth of the quest for a holy talisman....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
1298 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on James Joyce's Araby - Character, Structure and Style in Araby - Character, Structure and Style in Araby         According to Hazel Edwards, “A good story writer needs to be a craftsman, for the construction is tighter than that required for most novels. Usually a short story concentrates on a few characters- rarely more than three major ones. The story revolves around a single, dramatic incident which typifies the characters’ reactions. Length varies from 1,000 to about 5,000 words.” With these characteristics in mind, then we are going to examine James Joyce’s short story Araby  in terms of depiction of character, the story structure and the style....   [tags: Joyce Dubliners Araby Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
2408 words
(6.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
James Joyce's Araby Essay - James Joyce's "Araby"      Passion, adolescence, foolishness, and maturity are the first words that come to one’s mind to describe James Joyce’s short story, “Araby.” In it, he writes about a boy who falls deeply in love with his best friend’s sister, who through the story, doesn’t seem to notice him or care about him. The boy, who has yet to be named, lives in a poor and run-down town. During the story, certain characters contribute to the boy’s developing sense of maturity, and eventually, lead him into adulthood....   [tags: James Joyce Araby Essays] 1142 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]