Preview
Preview

Christian Ideals in The Grapes of Wrath Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 850 words (2.4 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



The Christian Ideals in The Grapes of Wrath

 

In Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath one of the themes discussed is the idea of Christian goodness exhibited in the Joads and other migrant workers. Those in the book representing this * "[eat] together with glad and sincere hearts." This type of selfless sharing is a Christian concept of good fellowship. Particularly, Ma shows her caring towards others from the beginning and urges others to do the same. Jim Casy, while struggling with the orthodox view of Christianity, still displays a general concern for his fellow man. Repeatedly the family and others associated sacrifice comfort for the requirements of others. When people are in need, a sacrifice for their behalf makes society more pleasant to inhabit.

 

Though the Joads do not have much, Ma feels that it is her duty to take care of others during the journey. In order to bring Jim Casy on the trip, she poses the idea that "[it's not] kin we... it's will we." She acknowledges that what they are about to endeavor is beyond their means already and that the decision to bring Casy along will be made for compassion, not ability. Presenting kindness to one's neighbor regardless of one's situation is a key Christian concept. This type of sacrifice soon becomes a standard in the behavior of Ma. Time and again, Ma gives to the others, forgetting her own needs. For the family, she lies with Grandma after her death so that so family can cross the Californian border. She does not complain or think of herself, but only asks 2 them to leave her alone so that she will be able to stay strong. This causes their small hierarchical family's troubles to be eased. She says: "I'm tar'd" because Ma gives her strength to all of them.
...


... middle of paper ...


...underlying standard. He believes that he must *"love [his] neighbor" if their world is ever to improve. Sairy Wilson exhibits this perception of Christian ethics by volunteering to help Ma with the task of burying Grandpa. She discerns that "people needs - to help," that by sacrificing for others, people are not only giving themselves a sense of security and unity, but also are setting an example of how others should live.

 

The Joads go through most of the book not realizing the reality of what they are doing for other people. This instinctive manner in which certain characters, like Ma and Jim Casy, give to others is a basis for Christian ideals. Eventually, all of the Joads develop this devotion. The only way the people can truly help themselves is "to create beyond the single need."

 

* from the NIV Student Bible- Acts 2:42-47; Leviticus 19:18


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay on The Character of Casey in The Grapes of Wrath - The Character of Casey in The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck passionately describes a time of unfair poverty, unity, and the human spirit growth in the classic novel, The Grapes of Wrath. The novel tells of real, diverse characters that experience growth through turmoil and hardship. Jim Casy, a personal favorite character, is an ex-preacher that meets with a former worshiper, Tom Joad. Casy continues a relationship with Tom and the rest of the Joads as they embark on a journey to California with the hopes of prosperity....   [tags: Grapes Wrath essays] 2466 words
(7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on The Grapes of Wrath as Communist Propaganda - The Grapes of Wrath as Communist Propaganda The Grapes of Wrath may be read as a direct indictment of the U.S. capitalist system of the early and mid twentieth century. Although the book on the surface level can fairly easily be read as anti-capitalist book, it goes further than that. The book both implicitly and explicitly advocates structural changes in the economic institutions of our country. Thus, it may be argued that the Grapes of Wrath is communist propaganda. Propaganda, according to The American Heritage Dictionary, is "the dissemination of a doctrine or cause or of information reflecting the views and interests of those people advocating such a doctrine or cause." The book...   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath essays] 1203 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Grapes Of Wrath - Jim Casy Chracter Analysis Essay - John Steinbeck passionately describes a time of unfair poverty, unity, and the human spirit in the classic, The Grapes of Wrath. The novel tells of real, diverse characters who experience growth through turmoil and hardship. Jim Casy- a personal favorite character- is an ex-preacher that meets up with a former worshiper, Tom Joad. Casy continues a relationship with Tom and the rest of the Joads as they embark on a journey to California in the hopes of prosperity and possibly excess. Casy represents how the many situations in life impact the ever-changing souls of human- beings and the search within to discover one's true identity and beliefs....   [tags: essays research papers] 2430 words
(6.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Quotes Indicating Morality in The Grapes of Wrath Essay - Themes: People often give up everything that have for others, not because they have a lot to give, but because they know what it feels like to have nothing. Quote: “She looked at Rose of Sharon huddled in the comfort. Ma’s eyes passed Rose of Sharon’s eyes passed Rose of Sharon’s eyes and then came back to them. And the two women looked deep into each other” (454). These were the actions taken before Rose of Sharon helps the starving stranger in the barn by feeding him her breast milk. Even though the Joads have never met this man, they know what it is like to be hungry and to suffer....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath] 988 words
(2.8 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Free Grapes of Wrath Essays: Religion in The Grapes of Wrath - Religion in The Grapes of Wrath In The Grapes of Wrath the author, John Steinbeck, presents religion in several ways including the fanaticism of the Sin Watchers, Jim Casy’s parallel character to Jesus Christ, and through the use of symbolism throughout the novel. Through these methods, Steinbeck weaves a web in which religion is presented as a double-edged blade; one can go to the path of being truly a devout, kind person, or one can choose the path of zealously, condemning all who would oppose or go against their views....   [tags: Grapes Wrath essays] 457 words
(1.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Subtle Metamorphosis in The Grapes of Wrath Essay - A Subtle Metamorphosis in The Grapes of Wrath The spirit of unity emerges as the one unfailing source of strength in John Steinbeck¹s classic The Grapes of Wrath. As the Joad family¹s world steadily crumbles, hope in each other preserves the members¹ sense of pride, of courage, and of determination. A solitary man holds a grim future; with others to love and be loved by, no matter how destitute one is materially, life is rich. This selflessness is not immediate, however; over the course of the book several characters undergo a subtle metamorphosis....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck] 828 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Ma Joad as Leader in The Grapes of Wrath Essay - In a crisis, a person's true colors emerge. The weak are separated from the strong and the leaders are separated from the followers. In John Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath, the Joad family, forced from their home in Oklahoma, head to California in search of work and prosperity only to find poverty and despair. As a result of a crisis, Ma Joad emerges as a controlled, forceful, and selfless authority figure for the family. Ma Joad exhibits exelent self-control during the sufferings and frustrations of the Joad's journey....   [tags: Grapes Wrath essays] 705 words
(2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Grapes of Wrath Essay: Naturalism in The Grapes of Wrath - Naturalism in The Grapes of Wrath In John Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath, the Joad family and the changing world in which they live is portrayed from a naturalistic point of view. Steinbeck characterizes the Joads and their fellow migrants as simple, instinct-bound creatures who are on an endless search for paradise (Owens 129). The migrants and the powers which force them to make their journey--nature and society--are frequently represented by animals. The Joads, when they initially leave home, are a group of simplistic, animal-like people who barely understand or even realize their plight, but as the story progresses, they begin to grow and adapt to their new circumsta...   [tags: Grapes Wrath essays] 1414 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Bonds With the Land in The Grapes of Wrath Essay - The Grapes of Wrath: Bonds With the Land To human beings, environment is vital. After spending a number of years in one place, it is very human to become attached. This is especially true with farmers. They spend their lives learning the land around them. The land becomes a friend to them, having almost human value. In the novel The Grapes of Wrath, author John Steinbeck conveys the connection people have with their land, without which they feel they cannot survive mentally or physically....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck] 496 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about The Setting of Grapes of Wrath - The Setting of Grapes of Wrath The Grapes of Wrath does not have one specific setting, but rather travels from Okalahoma to California. The setting in this novel is realistic because you can follow the Joads journey on a map. Accuracy to the novel was very important to Steinbeck because he wanted this novel to be a social document rather then just another piece of fiction. The main characters in the novel are sharecroppers turned into migrant workers much of the stetting is taken place outdoors....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck] 781 words
(2.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]