Preview
Preview

Essay on Utopia - Constitution of the United States as a Utopian Proposal

:: 4 Works Cited
Length: 1581 words (4.5 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The Constitution of the United States as a Utopian Proposal


    Few people would take issue with the statement that America faces monumental challenges both to its own well-being as well as to its self-imposed duty to become "a more perfect union". Over the years, many speakers, authors, and dreamers have used the dirty facts of this nation's (and its predecessors') seemingly unrepentant capitalism, paternalism, belligerence, and tendency toward cultural assimilation to declare the entire enterprise bankrupt and to focus, not on where, exactly, the USA went wrong, but instead on what the truly ideal civilization would look like. They have created, in speech or on paper, entire realms of happiness and harmony, free of injustice, crime, and any other negative social vice. They have failed, however, in most cases, to free themselves from the trap of the nature of the human animal and his uncanny ability to absolutely avoid accurate prediction or even adequate description. It is my suggestion that, out of the bulk of utopian proposals the world has seen, the Constitution of the United States does, in fact, come the closest to creating "no place" for the greatest number of people through its pragmatism, its admission to not knowing the nature of every man, and, most importantly, its allowal of alternate visions of Utopia.

 

 

Of course, all one needs to do to get a glimpse of the monumental challenges the USA faces is open the closest almanac. Nearly half (49%) of all American marriages end in divorce. Some 700,000 high school students end up dropping out of school each year. There are nearly one million cases of child neglect and/or abuse per year and 2,700,000 cases of violent crime. Around 8.5 million individuals...


... middle of paper ...


...ough a total change in the accepted social order. The framers of the Constitution were looking in the right direction; it is our legacy and responsibility to see that the essence of their vision is amended to accommodate the changes this nation has experienced since its founding and to provide the opportunity for every citizen to express, and possibly achieve, his or her own utopia.

 

Works Cited

Bellamy, Edward. Looking Backward: 2000 to 1887. Internet text version copyright 1996 by Geoffrey

Sauer. http://english-server.hss.cmu.edu/fiction/bellamy/contents.html

Brunner, Borgna, ed. 1997 Information Please Almanac. Boston: Information Please, LLC.

Constitution of the United States of America.

http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.overview.html.

Democratic Socialists of America. (1998). http://www.dsausa.org/dsa.html


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Paxton Island Constitution Essay - Paxton Island is a relatively new landmass, formed by centuries of volcanic activity. The vast resources make the island an idyllic setting for civilization, and soon enough, settlers enigmatically appeared on this utopia’s shores. Government was methodically constructed to ensure order at a federal level, as well as at municipal levels within each of the five communities on Paxton Island. Paxton Island established a democratic government, meaning that the people of the island nation have the right to vote, regardless of ethnicity or sex....   [tags: Government] 779 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on The Creation Of The Constitution - In creating the Constitution, the states had several different reactions, including a rather defensive reaction, but also an understanding reaction. As a document that provided the laws of the land and the rights of its people. It directs its attention to the many problems in this country; it offered quite a challenge because the document lent itself to several views and interpretations, depending upon the individual reading it. It is clear that the founders’ perspectives as white, wealthy or elite class, American citizens would play a role in the creation and implementation of The Constitution....   [tags: The Constitution] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comparing the United States Constitution with Local State Constitutions Essay - The United States Constitution begins with the simple phrase “We the People”. Yet, with three simple words, the ideology it stands for has shaped the entire country (O’Connor et al., 2011). The short phrase signifies that the document, and thus, the government, is based upon the people themselves. The Constitution reflects the culture and ideologies of its citizens. Similarly, state constitutions reflect the people, albeit in a more specific locality. The key differences between the United States Constitution and that of local states are due to the distinctions between the scope and characteristics of the people they govern....   [tags: Government]
:: 4 Works Cited
855 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States            The Preamble states the broad purposes the Constitution is intended to serve - to establish a government that provides for greater cooperation among the States, ensures justice and peace, provides for defense against foreign enemies, promotes the general well-being of the people, and secures liberty now and in the future.      Article I of the Constitution is based on the legislative department. Section 1. Legislative Power; the Congress: is the nations lawmaking body....   [tags: Constitution Summary Essays] 895 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay about The United States Constittution - The United States Constitution AMERICAN HISTORY – Pre-Columbian through the Civil War After the War the 13 colonies first formed a very weak central government under the Articles of Confederation. This government lacked, for example, any power to impose taxes, as it had no method of enforcing payment. It had no authority to override tax laws and tariffs between states. The Articles required unanimous consent from all the states before any changes could take effect. States took the central government so lightly that their representatives were often absent....   [tags: American History] 1110 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Proposal of Originalism - Originalism argues that the meaning of the Constitution was fixed at the time it was put in print. Therefore, in applying any question in regard to the constitution, the correct course of action is to determine the meaning at the time it was written and apply it to the current issue. People who are proponents of originalism believe that the purpose of having a written constitution is “to memorialize and entrench certain fundamental rights so that they can prevail in moments of passion when a crazed mob might want to cast them aside” (S.G....   [tags: Constitution, US Growth] 915 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on The Constitution of the United States - The Constitution of the United States The United States Constitution is the law of the United States. It is the foundation of this country and the most important document in its history. It provides the guidelines for the government and citizens of the United States. The Constitution will unquestionably continue to carry us into the 22nd century, just as it has for over two hundred years. The principles of the Constitution remain strong to this day, especially with respect to our government and to the Bill of Rights....   [tags: Law Land US History Constitution Government] 1412 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The American Constitution Essay - The American Constitution The basis of all law in the United States is the Constitution. This Constitution is a document written by "outcasts" of England. The Constitution of the United States sets forth the nation's fundamental laws. It establishes the form of the national government and defines the rights and liberties of the American people. It also lists the aims of the government and the methods of achieving them. The Constitution was written to organize a strong national government for the American states....   [tags: United States Constitution] 2881 words
(8.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Disney's Utopia Essay - To create a perfect society. That was the dream that Walt Disney had in the 1960’s when he dreamt up the Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow (1). Today, this is better known as Disney’s theme park, EPCOT. In 1995, however, the Disney people established their own town, making another of Walt’s dreams come true. Simply named Celebration, it is located in central Florida. In order to live in the utopian community, there are strict guidelines that each and every citizen must follow, known in the legal world as a “covenant”....   [tags: Disney Utopia Society] 1645 words
(4.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Utopia Essays - Utopia In the year 1515, a book in Latin text was published which became the most significant and controversial text ever written in the field of political science. Entitled, ‘DE OPTIMO REIPUBLICATE STATU DEQUE NOVA INSULA UTOPIA, clarissimi disertissimique viri THOMAE MORI inclutae civitatis Londinensis civis et Vicecomitis’, translated into English would read, ‘ON THE BEST STATE OF A COMMONWEALTH AND ON THE NEW ISLAND OF UTOPIA, by the Most Distinguished and Eloquent Author THOMAS MORE Citizen and Undersheriff of the Famous City of London.’....   [tags: Utopic Society Social Issues Essays]
:: 13 Works Cited
4263 words
(12.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]