Paradise Lost Essay

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The seat of faith resides in the will of the individual and not in the leaning to our own reasoning, for reasoning is the freedom of choosing what one accepts as one’s will. In considering the will was created and one cannot accuse the potter or the clay, Milton writes to this reasoning, as “thir own revolt,” whereas the clay of humankind is sufficient and justly pliable for use as a vessel of obedience or disobedience (3.117). The difficulty of this acceptance of obedience or disobedience is inherent in the natural unwillingness in acknowledging that we are at the disposal of another being, even God. One theme of Paradise Lost is humankind’s disobedience to a Creator, a Creator that claims control over its creation. When a single living thing which God has made escapes beyond the Creator’s control this is in essence an eradicating of the Creator God. A Creator who would create a creature who the Creator would or could not control its creation is not a sovereign God. For who would not hold someone responsible for manufacturing something that could not be controlled and consider it immoral to do so? To think that God created a universe that he has somehow abdicated to its own devices is to accredit immorality to the Creator. Since the nucleus of Milton’s epic poem is to “justifie the wayes of God” to his creation, these ‘arguments’ are set in theological Miltonesque terms in his words (1. 26). Milton’s terms and words in Paradise Lost relate the view of God to man and Milton’s view to the reader. Views viewed in theological terms that have blazed many wandering paths through the centuries to knot up imperfect men to explain perfect God.
To justify the ways of God is a well-trodden path, but there is more to only one path. For if...

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...o tensions. Paul the apostle wrote by the same Spirit that Milton claimed that the Potter has the power over the clay and by the riches of God’s mercy he shall show mercy upon who he wants to show mercy. Theologians of history, Augustine, Wyclif, Luther, Zwingli, Calvin and others all held this doctrine of predestination and taught it with vigor. With vigor predestination stands in Scripture and the challenge for Milton was to demonstrate the Father is reasonable, but at the same time God is the Almighty. So where does Milton’s views stand in relation to a perfect God? As others before "of Providence, Foreknowledge, Will and Fate, Fixt Fate, free will, foreknowledge absolute," in the Apostle Paul’s reply "O man, who art thou that repliest against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, why hast thou made me thus" (2.559,560- Romans 9:20 K.J.V.)?

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