Essay on Paradise Lost

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Paradise Lost depicts the story of the Fall of Man, because with the temptation from Satan Adam and Eve commit the first sin of mankind by disobeying God’s command. The Fall “refers to the first human transgression of the divine command” (Danielson 147). God knows everything and he knows that the Fall will happen and that’s when his plan for mankind starts, because then he will send Jesus Christ his Son to die on the cross to save all of mankind. Throughout the story, Satan is talked about significantly more than God is. Sometimes Satan is portrayed in a sense that makes the reader feel bad for him. Milton tries to express that Satan is a liar not that he is more powerful than God, but actually that he is weaker than God. On the other hand, although God is not talked about to the extent of Satan, He is always talked about in a way that shows His goodness towards His creation. Whether Milton supports God’s side or Satan’s, is an example of just one of the many debates associated with Paradise Lost. While writing the story, “Milton exemplifies two crucial tenets of Christian-Particularly Protestant-theology: man’s free will and Go’s grace and divine justice” (Bloom 14). Milton never tries to make the reader believe more in Satan or God, but he tries to paint the picture of what they look like in his own mind and then the reader can imagine what they look like for themselves in their own interpretation. Milton makes it clear that God ultimately wins because he is more powerful than Satan and always will be. Countless critics try to bash Milton’s God by establishing a reasoning that Milton is not supportive of God and portrays Satan in a better light. In Paradise Lost, Satan says “He deserved no such return From me, whom He created...

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...alizes how good and powerful God actually is when God shows Adam and Eve mercy after they disobey Him.
Milton proves to be on God’s side in many ways throughout Paradise Lost Including man’s free will, God’s creation, and God’s mercy. Even though he gives a greater description for Satan, Milton’s faith in God is seemingly more powerful. Paradise Lost proves that God’s Creation “is indeed the very exercise of God’s goodness which is apparent in all God’s works” (Sewell 125). Only God knows what is on the road ahead for mankind, but according to Milton God beholds the “…past, present and future” (III 77-78). God will ultimately be the one who determines mankind’s past, present, and future, not anyone else. Only God knows whether Milton’s statements are actually true and mankind will never know until the day when it’s our time to reach Heaven and stay forever.

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