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The Outbreak of Natural Philosophy from Religion Essays

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The Outbreak of Natural philosophy from Religion
Science was not as prominent as it is now before, some people rejected science and all it had to offer for a long time. This was primarily because of the fact that people did not want to change their belief, not only theirs but their previous generations had believed in this also. This religious dogma they had believed in all their life, it was not until about the scientific revolution in the 16th century that science was widely accepted by all. Thales and his students although wrong were the ones who directed speculative thoughts and also started the process that brought physics, chemistry and other sciences. They were part of the first set of philosophers who started to question the divine explanations for natural events. It could be proposed that science was started from the questioning of divine explanations for everything, they discovered that with human reasoning all the natural events could be understood. It was after this everything changed, people changed the way people looked at things and apart from that some things started to change like medicine and education. Pythagoras (580 – 507 B.C.E.) was another philosopher who turned down the belief of a divine spirit, he proposed that everything was made of numbers and natural order could be explained by mathematical relationships. His conclusion is said to have been derived from his musical studies, he notice a cut string that has been plucked has a higher octave and vibrates has about twice the number of vibrations a normal string would have. “Pythagoras then concluded that ‘numbers’ explained everything in the ‘cosmos’, his term for the orderly system embracing the earth and heavens” (The western humanities page ...


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...rs of the past. Some of the philosophers tried to reason with a Christian framework in their minds because some were Christians or some did not want to be opposed by the religious leaders. Religions have started to accept some of the ideas begotten from natural philosophy, this is because they realized that they were wrong or incomplete of some ideas. They have also discovered that they can use these ideas in their lives and still live by their religious beliefs, science is currently very important in the world for almost everything. There have been advances in medicine, politics, agriculture and a lot of things. This is because of those who started questioning the ideas passed down to them from the religious leaders. Religion is not considered bad as it helps to keep people optimistic, but the innovation of science has helped a lot in the developing of the
world.


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