Preview
Preview

Nature vs. Nurture in William Shakespeare’s The Tempest Essay examples

:: 11 Works Cited
Length: 1244 words (3.6 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

INTRODUCTION
William Shakespeare’s The Tempest tells the story of Prospero who is exiled on an island along with his daughter, Miranda. Inhabiting the island is a spirit named Ariel and an ugly monster named Caliban. Miranda, Ariel and Caliban all vary in nature. However, all have been tended to and have been nurtured on the island by Prospero. Especially through Caliban and Miranda, Shakespeare demonstrates that education and nurturing can affect the person’s true nature and self.
NURTURE VS. NURTURE
Nurture is how one is brought up or raised. It includes social standards and customs in the area one was raised. Nurture varies from nature. Nature is one’s biological makeup, or how one was born. Caliban, for example, was born a monster. His mother was an evil witch named Sycorax. When Prospero first came on the island, he and Caliban got along and planned to dually rule the island. However, after Caliban attempted to rape Miranda, Prospero made Caliban his slave. Although Prospero attempted to turn Caliban good, his evil nature took over the attempted nurture. Michael Taylor in Shakespeare Criticism in the Twentieth Century describes the nature of Caliban.
“Absolute natural evil of Caliban in The Tempest in the case of Caliban, it we accept the absoluteness of his natural evil, we must accept what Charney describes as a necessary (and absolute) ‘discontinuity in his character:. . .” (Bloom 128)
Caliban is described as “naturally evil”. Despite any efforts, his nature cannot be changed. His natural evil in The Tempest will always triumph any attempts to change him. His relationship to an evil witch made him naturally evil and will forever be who he truly is.
Miranda has been raised along with Caliban. Pros...


... middle of paper ...


...it, MI: Gale Research, 1987. Print.
Scott, Mark W. Shakespearean Criticism: Volume 133, Excerpts from the Criticism of William Shakespeare's Plays and Poetry, from the First Published Appraisals to Current Evaluations. Detroit, MI: Gale Research, 1987. Print.
Scott, Mark W. Shakespearean Criticism: Volume 8, Excerpts from the Criticism of William Shakespeare's Plays and Poetry, from the First Published Appraisals to Current Evaluations. Detroit, MI: Gale Research, 1987. Print.
Scott, Mark W. Shakespearean Criticism: Volume 94, Excerpts from the Criticism of William Shakespeare's Plays and Poetry, from the First Published Appraisals to Current Evaluations. Detroit, MI: Gale Research, 1987. Print.
Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. New York: Washington Square, 1961. Print.
Taylor, Michael. Shakespeare Criticism in the Twentieth Century. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2001. Print.



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
The Tempest the Play by William Shakespeare Essay - The Tempest the Play by William Shakespeare Ruler’s in general face many problems, as is the nature of having power and authority. However rulers like Prospero face even more difficulties, as Prospero has the ultimate power of magic and can control and manipulate people and their actions, more so than a natural ruler. The first difficulty presented is an issue, which is dealt with throughout the play: the idea of how much or how little to intervene. From the beginning of the play we are told of how and why Prospero is usurped from his dukedom, “I thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated/ To closeness, and the bettering of my mind/ With that which, but by being so retired, O’er-prized all...   [tags: Tempest William Shakespeare Essays] 1262 words
(3.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay on William Shakespeare's The Tempest - William Shakespeare's The Tempest Love, as defined by Merriam-Webster, is a “strong affection”, a “warm attraction”, an “unselfish loyal and benevolent concern” for another. It is “to feel a passion, devotion, or tenderness” for another. Love is simple and yet so utterly complex. Love is that which has the power to build you up and when taken away has the potential to knock you down. The Tempest by William Shakespeare is a political play with a love story woven throughout it. This tale of passion is one that is presented through Prospero’s daughter Miranda and Alonso’s son Ferdinand....   [tags: William Shakespeare Tempest Essays]
:: 9 Works Cited
2094 words
(6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on Prospero and Ariel in The Tempest by William Shakespeare - Prospero and Ariel in The Tempest by William Shakespeare Throughout the years since The Tempest was first published in the 1623 Folio, there has been much debate among Shakespeare’s contemporaries and critics as to the significance of the figure of Prospero and other major characters featured in the work. In this paper, I want to examine the figure of Prospero and his relationship with the character Ariel. In doing this, I want to show how Prospero is a figure for the artist, how Ariel is a figure for the poetic imagination, and how the relationship between Prospero and Ariel explores the relationship between the artist and his or her poetic imagination....   [tags: Tempest William Shakespeare Essays] 2317 words
(6.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Importance of Caliban in William Shakespeare's The Tempest Essay - The Importance of Caliban in William Shakespeare's The Tempest   'This thing of darkness, I must acknowledge mine.' Although many seem baffled by Shakespeare's The Tempest, the plot is not the target to be deciphered. We understand The Tempest through understanding the character of Caliban. Many works highlight the virtuous side of human nature, failing to acknowledge the darkness that lives within the hearts of all. The Tempest is not one of these works. This story realizes that it is impossible to have the good aspect of human nature without the bad....   [tags: Tempest essays Shakespeare ]
:: 5 Works Cited
1814 words
(5.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on Prospero in Shakespeare's The Tempest - The Greatness of Prospero in William Shakespeare's The Tempest        No man is an island. It takes a strong, mature man to forgive those who hand him misfortune. It takes a real man to drop to his knees and repent. The character of Prospero in Shakespeare's Tempest is a man who has suffered much. Prospero is a puppet master throughout the play, but releases everything to save himself from his own self. The enemies in the play are not those whom he shipwrecked, they are of little consequence, and he plays them easily....   [tags: Tempest essays William Shakespeare Papers]
:: 4 Works Cited
989 words
(2.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Shakespeare's The Tempest as a Microcosm of Society Essay - The Tempest as Microcosm of Society       The Tempest is one of Shakespeare's most universal plays and, not coincidentally, is very much concerned with human behavior and emotion. As John Wilders observes in The Lost Garden, “Prospero’s island is what the sociologists call a ‘model’ of human society. Its cast of characters allows Shakespeare to portray in microcosm nearly all the basic, fundamental social relationships: those of a ruler to his territory, a governor to his subjects, a father to his child, masters to servants, male to female, and the rational to the irrational within the human microcosm itself" ([London: Macmillan Press Ltd., 1978], 127)....   [tags: Shakespeare The Tempest]
:: 6 Works Cited
1254 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Oppression of Caliban in The Tempest Essay - The Oppression of Caliban in The Tempest William Shakespeare's, "The Tempest," provides insight into the hierarchy of command and servitude by order of nature. This play uses the relationship between its characters to display the control of the conqueror over the conquered. It also shows how society usually places the undesirable members at the bottom of the chain of command, even though they may be entitled to a higher social status. For example, the beginning of the play opens with a scene on a boat in the midst of a terrible storm....   [tags: Tempest essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
2589 words
(7.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Imagery in The Tempest, by William Shakespeare Essays -     William Shakespeare's play The Tempest utilizes extensive imagery which goes beyond merely creating atmosphere and background or emphasizing the major themes of the play. The supernatural plays a considerable role in the play, thus so does the use of imagery, which is more extensive and somewhat different from many other of Shakespeare's works. The imagery is used as a mediator of supernatural powers, to emphasize the natural scene of action, and establish the enchanted island which becomes vivid through such a wealth of single features and of concrete touches....   [tags: Tempest essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
3744 words
(10.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Human Relationships Between The Central Characters in William Shakespeare's The Tempest - Human Relationships Between The Central Characters in William Shakespeare's The Tempest In this essay I intend to explore the ways that William Shakespeare has presented the relationships between the main characters within his play “The Tempest”. I shall investigate Ferdinand and Miranda’s relationship, the father/daughter bond between Miranda and Prospero and Caliban’s lust after Miranda. Shakespeare was intending to represent several different groups of people in society through his plays and “The Tempest” was no exception to the rule....   [tags: Tempest Shakespeare] 1450 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
tempnature Duality Between Nature and Society in Shakespeare's The Tempest - Duality Between Nature and Society in The Tempest                  One of the essential themes of The Tempest is the duality between nature and society.  This is made evident through the character of Caliban: the disfigured fish-like creature that inhabits the island upon which the play takes place.  Caliban lacks civility because he was born on the island deprived of any social or spiritual morality other than nature and instinct.  He is literally man untamed.  Caliban is not monstrous simply for the sake of being frightening; his ghastly appearance is intended to literally depict the essential differences between civilization and natural instinct....   [tags: Tempest essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
807 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]