Preview
Preview

Essay about Mary Shelley, Sartre, and Virginia Woolf

:: 3 Works Cited
Length: 1333 words (3.8 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

In Existentialism is a Humanism Sartre explains that one can imagine to be whatever they want, and through choice they can become that person. However, this choice is not found from with in but rather is a decision based on our consciousness of our own desires as well as the opinions of others. In To the Lighthouse, Woolf argues that the unreal are our thoughts, and these thoughts are centered around finding our purpose. She relates how our thoughts and abilities bring us to different perspectives of reality. In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, she provides a sort of combination between Woolf and Sartre. Through the character of the creature we see inherent notions that the monster has as well as perceptions from the outside world. In all of the works however it is noted that thoughts and conjectures are what lead to action, which thus reveal and create our reality.
Sartre's philosophy was often deemed as pessimistic, overlooking human solidarity and a propeller of quietism. (17-19 ) For this reason he composes the argument that existentialism is a type of humanism. Sartre considers himself an atheist existentialist, but regardless of his disbelief in God, he asserts that man is what he chooses to be. A man's choice however does not only develop from the individual's reason but also by considering the factors outside of himself. In order for a man to exist as an entity of any sort, man must think of himself as something and thereafter pursue it. Sartre proposes:
“This [existentialism] is humanism because we remind man that there is no legislator other than himself and that he must, in his abandoned state, make his own choices, and also because we show that it is not by turning inward, but by constantly seeking a g...


... middle of paper ...


...ly for Mary Shelley the combination between our perceptions, actions, and the perceptions of other are what causes reality. Sartre emphasizes action more that others perceptions, Woolf emphasizes the many perceptions more than action, and Shelley creates a balance between the two. However all three authors suggest that thoughts, actions and the consciousness of the other which help to elucidate and make reality.


Works Cited
Sartre, Jean-Paul. Existentialism Is a Humanism = (L'Existentialisme Est Un Humanisme) ; Including, a Commentary on The Stranger (Explication De L'Étranger). Ed. John Kulka. New Haven: Yale UP, 2007. Print.
Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft. Frankenstein: The 1818 Text, Contexts, Criticism. Ed. J. Paul Hunter. 2nd ed. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2012. Print.
Woolf, Virginia. To the Lighthouse. Ed. Mark Hussey. Orlando: Harcourt, 2005. Print.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Gothic As Portrayed In Frankenstein by Mary Shelley Essay - The term 'gothic' has many different forms. The most important and original form is architecture during the medieval period. It starts out with the great cathedral, Saint-Denis, of Paris. Then the Westminster Abbey of London was built. These are characterized by their pointed arches and flying buttresses. Gothicism also came in the form of art. Tres Riches Heures du duc de Berry, by the Limburg brothers, showed elegance through statements in the best known way of gothic art. This popular style of art is called manuscript illuminations....   [tags: Mary Shelley] 709 words
(2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Mary Shelley's Life Of Literature Essay - "I, the miserable and the abandoned, am an abortion, to be spurned at, and kicked, and trampled on" (SparkNote on Frankenstein). This famous quote said by Frankenstein, in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, which leaves a lasting impression on the reader was intended by Shelley. Literature was a major part of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's childhood and adulthood. Mary Shelley's parents brought literature to her from the day she was born. Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, as she was named at birth, was born to two intellectual rebels of their day, William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, on August 30th, 1797....   [tags: Mary Shelley Author] 1393 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about Review of Mary Shelley's Frankeinstein - Frankenstein is a Romantic Horror novel written by Mary Shelley. Originally published in 1818, a revised version was also published in 1831. As a Romantic novel, Frankenstein is very emotional and addresses the connection between man and nature. This nightmarish tale was the result of a friendly challenge between Shelley, Percy Shelley, Lord Byron, and Claire Clairmont to see who could compose the most horrifying ghost story. Shelley won after conceiving the idea of Frankenstein after experiencing a dream....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein] 1033 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Mary Shelley was born in 1797. She had a difficult life with many family upsets’, miscarriages and suffered personal depression; she died aged 53. Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein firstly as a short ghost story but it was published as a novel in 1816. Frankenstein is a Gothic novel and it deals with two genres, Gothicism and science fiction. Gothicism is part of the Romantic Movement that started in the late eighteenth century. The Romantic Movement is based on freedom of thought and expression and the belief of living in an age of new beginnings and high possibilities....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein Essays] 3360 words
(9.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay - Sympathy in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein In her novel, 'Frankenstein', Mary Shelley employs many innovative literary techniques to invoke feelings of sympathy for the monster. Sympathy is created by the author both by making the readers pity the monster’s loathsome existence and by leading them to understand his violent and cruel actions. We pity the creature because of the way he is treated by mankind and we can identify with his feelings and reactions and understand why he behaves as he does....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein Essays] 2939 words
(8.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about Analysis of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - Analysis of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Analyzing a book can be a killer. Especially when it contains tons of subtle little messages and hints that are not picked up unless one really dissects the material. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is a prime example. It is analyzed by scholars all the time because of the subtle messages it sends through its themes, one of which needs to be discussed that is called Romanticism. Romanticism dealt with simplifying things as a break from the previous age which deal with grandeur....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein] 1717 words
(4.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein In 1818 a novel was written that tingled people’s minds and thrilled literary critics alike. Frankenstein was an instant success and sold more copies than any book had before. The immediate success of the book can be attributed to the spine-tingling horror of the plot, and the strong embedded ethical message. Although her name did not come originally attached to the text, Mary Shelley had written a masterpiece that would live on for centuries. Nearly 200 movies have been adapted from the text since the birth of Hollywood....   [tags: Mary shelley Frankenstein Essays] 1642 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein An outsider is someone who is not a member of a particular circle or group of people He/She is isolated (separated) from other people and regarded as being different such as people looking, dressing, acting or talk differently. Outsiders have always been around and always will exist. Because society (i.e. - those who are not outsiders) like someone to pick on to make themselves feel better or superior. Outsiders are treated in various ways, sometimes people pity them but they are usually rejected by other people....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein Essays] 751 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essays - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein The characterization of Victor’s creature, the monster, in the movie although somewhat dramatically different from Mary Shelley’s portrayal in the novel Frankenstein also had its similarities. Shelley’s views of the monster were to make him seem like a human being, while the movie made the monster out to be a hideous creation. The creature’s appearance and personality are two aspects that differ between the novel and movie while his intellectual and tender sides were portrayed the same....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein Essays] 933 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Mary Shelley's Frankenstein - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein After reading the book Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and then seeing several adaptations done for the silver screen, there are changes that the films make to the book. The most evident change that jumps out at me is the portrayal of Dr. Victor Frankenstein. The common missing element in all of the film versions of the classic novel is the way they treat the character of Victor. The films all tend to downplay what a “monster” Victor is and instead stress how much of a monster the Creature is....   [tags: Mary Shelley Frankenstein Essays] 1244 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]