Preview
Preview

Major Problems in American Immigration History Essay

:: 4 Works Cited
Length: 1424 words (4.1 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

In Chapter 8 of Major Problems in American Immigration History, the topic of focus shifts from the United States proper to the expansion and creation of the so called American Empire of the late Nineteenth Century. Unlike other contemporary colonial powers, such as Britain and France, expansion beyond the coast to foreign lands was met with mixed responses. While some argued it to be a mere continuation of Manifest Destiny, others saw it as hypocritical of the democratic spirit which had come to the United States. Whatever their reasons, as United States foreign policy shifted in the direction of direct control and acquisition, it brought forth the issue of the native inhabitants of the lands which they owned and their place in American society. Despite its long history of creating states from acquired territory, the United States had no such plans for its colonies, effectively barring its native subjects from citizenship. Chapter 8’s discussion of Colonialism and Migration reveals that this new class of American, the native, was never to be the equal of its ruler, nor would they, in neither physical nor ideological terms, join in the union of states.
The late 1800’s was a watershed moment for the United States, during which time the Industrial Revolution and the desire for expansion brought about through Manifest Destiny, began to run parallel. Following the end of the Spanish-American war, the United States found itself with a wealth of new territory ceded to it from the dying Spanish empire. The issue of what to do with these new lands became a source of debate all the way up to the U.S. Congress. Men like Albert J. Beveridge, a Senator from Indiana, advocated the annexation, but not necessarily the incorporation of these new l...


... middle of paper ...


...y Burnett, “The Noncitizen National and the Law of American Empire” , “in Major Problems in American Immigration History, ed. Mae M Ngai and Jon Gjerde (Boston: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, 2013),278
Dawnes v. Bidwell, “Dawnes v. Bidwell Rules Puerto Rico Belongs to But Not Part of United States, 1901” ," in Major Problems in American Immigration History, ed. Mae M Ngai and Jon Gjerde (Boston: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, 2013),271

Joseph Henry Crooker, “Joseph Henry Crooker Says America Should Not Have Colonies, 1900” ,” ," in Major Problems in American Immigration History, ed. Mae M Ngai and Jon Gjerde (Boston: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, 2013),268

Albert J. Beveridge, “Senator Albert J. Beveridge Supports an American Empire, 1898” ," in Major Problems in American Immigration History, ed. Mae M Ngai and Jon Gjerde (Boston: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning, 2013), 267


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
History of Latino/a Immigration to the U.S. Essay - Eleanor Roosevelt said, “the future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” That statement holds strong for immigrants in America. Equal access to opportunities allows immigrants to achieve the American dream. Their success correlates with America’s success because of the contributions immigrants provide to America. Unfortunately, the current immigration policy in America denies many immigrants the American dream. It is crucial to understand the historical context of immigration in America....   [tags: Immigration]
:: 2 Works Cited
1472 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Illegal Immigration In The United States Essay - Why does the issue of immigration divide American opinions when the United States is a country built by immigrants. The online encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org defines immigration to the United States as "the permanent movement of foreigners to the United States." This online encyclopedia also states that immigration to the United States has been a major source of population growth and cultural change throughout American history." In order to establish an objective and well thought out viewpoint on this very sensitive subject, I thought it would be best to discuss as many different viewpoints as possible....   [tags: Immigration and Politics] 1731 words
(4.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Immigration Helps America Essay - Immigration Helps America Immigration can be defined as passing foreigners to a country and making it their permanent residence. Reasons ranging from politics, economy, natural disasters, wish to change ones surroundings and poverty are in the list of the major causes of immigration in both history and today. In untied states, immigration comes with complexities in its demographic nature. A lot of cultural and population growth changes have been witnessed as a result of immigration. In the following paper, I will focus on how immigration helps United States as compared to the mostly held view that it hurts America....   [tags: Immigration ]
:: 10 Works Cited
1203 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Current Immigration in America - For four hundred years, immigrants have been coming to the United States for whatever reason, whether it be job opportunities, conflicts in their native country, or to give their children the chance to grow up in a free nation. The first U.S. Census, taken in 1790, the population was around four million and this country still has thousands of foreigners relocating to the states. The immigrant population has increased ever since; therefore, America can still be labeled as a melting pot. From 2000 to 2007, the U.S....   [tags: Immigration, USA,]
:: 6 Works Cited
1305 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Reform Immigration Laws in the United States Essay - Current status of immigration in this country is totally out of control. Current immigration laws are not being enforced properly, borders are not fully protected and as a result the quality of life has negatively impacted the United States. In the 1980’s, there were 9,000 illegal immigrants that were imprisoned in the federal and state prisons, which currently is overloaded. Today, 352,000 are in prison under overcrowding conditions. Of these hundreds of thousands of immigrants that have been imprisoned, 27,000 have committed repeated crimes....   [tags: economics, money, cost, immigration] 1293 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Immigration Integration - In today’s America, all one has to do is look around to see the myriad of different kinds of people currently making up the population. Most of these people are descendants of immigrants, and quite a few may even be immigrants themselves. Understanding the role of immigrants in our society is important, especially when there are such differing views of whether they help or hurt us as a society. Integration programs have been put into place to attempt to transition immigrants into American society and help dispel fears of our country losing its identity, instead focusing on our shift to multiculturalism....   [tags: Immigration]
:: 6 Works Cited
1108 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about The Effects of Immigration In The U.S. Economy - Introduction Throughout history, countless millions of people left their native land and moved to a strange country where no one knows what kind of faith lies ahead for them. The heaviest immigration worldwide took place from the early 1800’s to the Great Depression. Most of the immigrants came from Europe and half of them immigrated to the United States. Whatever prompted the immigrants, they were brave, bold, and courageous men and women. They left familiar communities for a new land and a new people....   [tags: Immigration Immigrants Economics Essays Papers]
:: 19 Works Cited
3291 words
(9.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay about Three Majors Eras In American Labor History - There have been many years throughout American labor history that have changed the ways that the affected communities live. Many movements have shifted styles of working, changed the nature of the working-class life, and have brought about such things as unions that we still possess today. In particular there are three major eras that have brought about such changes and one that is of the most importance. The progressive era brought us many changes in the workforce along with changes in technology....   [tags: American History] 1137 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Asian Indians Immigration to America and Their Major Contributions to Society - The Asian Indians Immigration to America and Their Major Contributions to Society Asian Indians come from an area with the second largest population in the world, but form only one of the smallest minorities in the United States. America was influenced by their religious and political beliefs long before the first immigrants arrived in the 19th century. The congressional act of 1947 granted them citizenship. Now, Asian Indians hold many important occupations (students, teachers, writers, musicians, scientists)....   [tags: Papers] 1506 words
(4.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Immigration - Kalapodas 8 Dec. 1999 History 101 Dr. Tassinari Immigration: The New American Paul Kalapodas 8 Dec. 1999 Immigration For many, immigration to the United States during the late 19th to early 20th century would be a new beginning to a prosperous life. However there were many acts and laws past to limit the influx of immigrants, do to prejudice, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act. Later on into the 20th century there would be laws repealing the older immigration laws and acts making it possible for many more foreigners to immigrate to the United States....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 3 Works Cited
6920 words
(19.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]