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Essay about The Life and Works of James Joyce

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Ulysses
James Joyce was a renowned Irish author and poet most known for writing the book Ulysses which parallels the events of The Odyssey in a variety of writing styles. Although Ulysses is considered his magnum opus his other works including Dubliners, A portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Finnegans Wake are held in high esteem by many.
Joyce was born in the Irish city of Dublin on the second of February, 1882 and was baptized by the order of his catholic mother and father three days later. By the age of five he had moved to the town of Bray 12 miles outside of Dublin, there he was attacked by a dog and this sparked his lifelong cynophobia which may be suggested in Ulysses in episode 12 where the dog is described as a bloody mongrel and other negative phrases. By the age of eight Joyce had written a eulogy of a man by the name of Charles Stewart Parnell. In 1893 Joyce was offered a place at the Jesuit school, Belvedere College, the same year his father lost his job marking the beginning of their families decline into poverty. In 1895 Joyce enrolled in English, French, and Italian at the University College Dublin. This was also the time period when he started becoming active in drama and literature circles writing his first publication and a few plays. In 1902 Joyce graduated from UCD and then went to go study medicine in paris, after several months in Paris he received a telegraph from his father that said his mother was diagnosed with cancer. He quickly returned to Ireland where and his mother died soon thereafter, James and his brother refused to join the rest of his family in prayer at her bedside; this is notable because in Ulysses the character Stephen Dedalus refuses to do the same and his aunt is appalled and te...


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...f The Odyssey with loose metaphors.
Not only is Ulysses divided into chapters but it is also divided into three parts, The Telemachiad, The Odyssey, and The Nostos. These three parts also divide The Odyssey. The Telemachiad in Ulysses consists of the first three chapters all of which focus on the character Stephen Dedalus, and it isn’t until chapter four where the reader meets Leopold Bloom for the first time. This first part, The Telemachiad, signifies the beginning of the story and starts off with an In Medias Res beginning. The second part and main part of the novel is where most of the so called “action,” takes place this consists of the episodes four through fifteen and this section tells the story of several main characters including Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus as well as the events of a myriad of side characters


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