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Essay on John Milton's Epic Poem, Lost Paradise

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John Milton created an epic poem unlike any other. He created the poem while going blind, and recited it in its entirety, after he went completely blind, for his daughters to record. Paradise Lost is arguably the greatest epic poem ever written, though not the most well-known. It is so great because it is so modern. Other epics, such as The Iliad or The Odyssey written by Homer are poems of the past. They incorporate a religion that is no longer followed, and are something of science fiction today. Milton’s Paradise Lost is based on Christian Theology, and contains, what many believe, a hero that should not be considered a hero at all. Milton places Satan as the epic hero in his epic poem. Satan is the main character, and the reader understands most of the story of Paradise Lost through Satan’s eyes. Satan is a peculiar character, as he constantly displays conflicting emotions about being forced into Hell; his motivations throughout the poem give him some qualities, as seen in lines 242-270 of Book 1, that traditional epic heroes have, but there are also characteristics that make Sat...


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